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Old Aug 27, 2011, 12:23 PM   #81
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done ))))
the card is ready for use now...

Thanks a lot!!!!!
u have been real help....
i was abt to format the card yest morining..had no hope of gettin my pics back
but thot i can giv it a try...
u gave me baby steps to do it...
thanks again Mr Jim C
hope u ll help again when i need ...
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Old Aug 27, 2011, 12:26 PM   #82
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No problem. I was glad to help. Sorry to take so much time trying to mount it, when the file system was damaged badly and we ended up failing to get that part working.

P.S.

I'd keep the disk image copies we made on your external drive, just in case you find that photorec didn't get everything important from it. That way, we could always copy those images back to a card later (either that same one, or another card that's at least as large) and try other utilities on it.

But, on the surface, I doubt you're going to find anything else that photorec couldn't recover (since the file system appears to be damaged enough that fsck couldn't repair it; and chkdsk under Windows isn't even finding the file system since it thinks the card is raw).

There are other options we could try if you find out some images are missing that you really need. For example, we could copy the disk image files back to an undamaged card and use testdisk to try and recreate the partition table on it after it matches up the correct start and stop offsets for the partition. That's not very hard to do, so let me know if you don't have everything you need from it and we can pursue it further to see if anything else can be recovered (and the only thing that would be recoverable is any images on it that were not contiguous, since photorec would have already found the rest).

Also, if you have a few minutes, you may want to let me talk you through installing Mepis to your hard drive real quick (the install only takes around 10 minutes to run). That way, you'd be setup in a dual boot config with both Mepis and Windows so that you could select the operating system you want to boot into each time you restart your PC.

That's the way I'm setup (dual boot config with Mepis and Windows), so I can select the Operating System I want to boot into each time I restart my PC. I rarely use Windows.
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Old Aug 27, 2011, 12:38 PM   #83
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I checked again
i have all the images that i can recall i clicked...
but i ll keep the iso file safely and try diff soft on it....

Jim this is not my own PC i use my uncle's system...
my pc dosnt hav net...
but yeah u can post abt that mepis set up...(which i ll try on my pc)
i ll read that 1st thing in the morning....
n also if u can tell me advantage of dual boot config ?
i hav heard using mor than 1 os leads to crash...

it was fun doing this with u...
thanks again
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Old Aug 27, 2011, 12:48 PM   #84
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Sure (I'll post what you need to do to setup your PC in a dual boot config with Windows). I've got to run to the store again, and I'll do that this later you if you want to try setting one up that way tomorrow.

As for advantages, you just went through one example of where having Linux around can help out. ;-)

Sometimes Linux may have programs available that work better than programs available under Windows, just because something was written specifically for linux that works better (ddrescue, the program that was able to copy your card so that photorec could recover images from a disk image file it created is one example). No one operating system is perfect for everything. ;-)

You may also find a lot of other apps available for Linux may be nice to have. For example, kdenlive (very nice video editor) is preinstalled in Mepis, as is digiKam (very nice image management solution) and other apps. There are tens of thousands of applications available for linux, and when you see one you want, you can usually install it with a few mouse clicks. Also, if you have problems with your Windows setup (malware, update problems, etc.), being able to boot into a different Operating System and still get to the files on your Windows partitions can be handy.

No, using more than one OS on it has nothing to do with crashes. With a dual boot setup, they would be totally independent of each other (they'd each have their own disk area, and only one would be loaded at any given time, which is the one you select from the boot menu choices when you restart your PC)

I always setup my PCs that way.

BTW, I'm running in Mepis 11 right now using Firefox to type the posts you're seeing from me. Windows 7 is also on this PC. But, I rarely use it for anything.
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Old Aug 27, 2011, 11:17 PM   #85
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Jim C,
One concern ...
I found that it was very slow, even opening dolphin was slow, and if i used 3-4 application the system would hang
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Old Aug 28, 2011, 8:11 AM   #86
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See the edit at the bottom of this post.

How much memory does it have in it? Mepis 11 does take a bit more resources compared to some distros. But, if you've got at least 1GB, you should be OK with it.

Running from a DVD is slower, because your transfer speed is slower compared to a hard drive, plus you're decompressing software "on the fly" running from DVD, since software on it is compressed so that it takes up less room.

You also don't have any virtual memory space running from DVD. With a hard drive installation, you define a Linux Swap Partition that the distro can use to save on real memory, by swapping out program memory used infrequently to the Swap Partition you define. So, you can get by with a machine that doesn't have as much physical memory installed once Mepis sees a Linux Swap Partition it can use.

The installation itself is very simple. The hardest part is getting your hard drives ready for it by "shrinking" (resizing) an NTFS partition to free up some space for Linux partitions. With Windows 7, it's best to use Microsoft's Disk Management program to resize an NTFS partition. With XP, it's easier to use one of the Linux partitioning utilities for that purpose. With Mepis 11, you'll find one in your System menus under your Start Menu (Mepis logo at left bottom of screen)>System>Other Applications>KDE Partition Manager. Enter root as the password when prompted for one.

After you load the KDE Partition Manager, you then select a hard drive from the Device List on the left side of the screen, and you'll see the partitions defined on that drive on the right side of the screen.

How much free space is on your 1TB Internal Hard Drive?

What's interesting is the way your drives are partitioned. With your 1TB internal drive, someone (you?) setup an extended partition, then defined 2 logical NTFS partitions inside of it. That's a very good way to approach partitioning, since you are limited to 4 primary partitions on a disk drive, and by using logical partitions instead, you can easily define more than 4 partitions later.

I setup my drives that way, since it's not uncommon for me to have a dozen different partitions defined on some drives so I can install Windows, as well as a variety of of different Linux distributions, plus swap and shared data partitions on a given drive (whereas I'd be limited to 4 partitions if I they were not being defined as logical partitions inside of an extended partition).

What I'd probably do is boot into the Mepis 11 DVD and select your 1TB internal drive (it should show up as sda in the device list from KDE Partition Manager), then click on sda6 on the right side of the page (that's the second NTFS partition defined on it), and select the "Resize/Move" menu choice.

That choice will allow you to resize that NTFS partition (make it smaller to free up some space on the drive). I'd probably free up around 50GB if you have it available (leave the free space at the end of the partition). Then, right click on that free space area, select "New", and and create a 1GB Linux Swap partition (1024MB).

Just check the box for "Extended" under partition type, select Linux Swap from the drop down list of File System Types, and plug in 1024MB as the size. Leave 0 bytes free in front of it, with the rest of the 50GB of unallocated space after it If you scroll down in this section of the manual, you'll see what the "New" partition screen looks like:

http://www.mepiscommunity.org/user_m...ml#section03-5

Then, I'd right click on the unallocated space after that Linux Swap Partition (from the graphical representation you'll see for your drive at the top of the screen), and select "New" again. As before, check Extended as the Partition Type. But, this time, select EXT4 from the drop down list of File System Types. Leave 0 bytes free in front of it, then select a partition size of around 20GB, leaving the rest of the drive as free space after it. Then, once you've defined a Linux Swap Partition and an EXT4 partition, click on the Apply button at the top of the screen and it will actually perform those tasks (up until that point, it hasn't done anything yet).

Why not use all of the free space from resizing your NTFS partiton? Well... you don't need that much space for the Linux distribution and programs you can install (I'll often set mine up for only 10GB), and you can use your NTFS partitions for data (so that both Linux and Windows can share the same data files). The main reason I'd leave some free space is so you can install more linux distros later if you want to, by just telling one of the installers to use free space on the drive (so they don't need to resize anything later, which can be time consuming).

For example, you may want to give Kubuntu a try, as it's using a newer version of KDE, with newer versions of some applications, with a larger user base compared to Mepis. Or, you may want to try OpenSUSE 11.4, Mint 11, or some of the other distros around. On the PC I'm using right this minute, I've got Windows 7, Linux Mint 11, OpenSUSE 11.4 and Mepis 11 installed. But, I stay in Mepis 11 most of the time.

Then, after you free up some space on your 1TB Internal Drive by resizing sda6 (second NTFS partition on your internal 1GB drive), creating a 1GB Linux Swap Partition (which will be sda7), and creating an EXT4 Partition (which will be sda8), click on the icon for the Mepis Installer.

Select "Custom Install on Existing Partitions" (since we've already created the partitions we want to use). Then, at the next step, select sda7 as your Swap Partition and select sda8 as your root and home locations from the drop down lists of partitions you'll find. Personally, I use the same partition for both root and home, even though they can be different. Home is in it's own folder anyway, which can be backed up and restored by itself if doing any kind of upgrade.

Leave everything else at defaults (services started at bootup, etc.), and leave the box checked to install GRUB in the MBR (Master Boot Record), selecting sda as the drive. GRUB is the boot manager that will give you a Menu of boot choices each time you restart your PC. It will find Windows and add it to the list of choices you'll have.

When you get to the screens asking about a PC and Group name, it doesn't make a lot of difference what you use. Just pick something you like. Ditto for the default username and password. Just pick a user name you like and give it a password (and it will ask you to type it in twice to make sure they match and you know what it is). You'll also need to specify a root password. Make sure you don't forget it. ;-)

Note that after you install it to your hard drive, you'll need to plug in the root password you defined for any tasks needing root permissions (like some of the disk related tasks we were doing earlier when I asked you to type in su and enter root as the password when prompted). For example, installing new software using Synaptic (the package manager you'll find in the menus for that purpose) will require you to type in the root password you define when installing Mepis. But, when you boot into a Live DVD (versus using the hard disk installation), the root password will always be root with Mepis.

Then, when the installation is finished (it only takes about 10 minutes if you already have partitions defined), when you reboot, you'll see a boot menu with Mepis and Windows on it.

Mepis will be the first boot choice in the menus, and it will default to loading it after about 10 seconds if you don't pick anything else. But, you can edit /etc/boot/menu.lst later if you want to swap the boot menu choices around.

Note that once you install GRUB in the MBR, make sure you don't delete Mepis. Otherwise, you'll need to install a different boot manager to boot into Windows again. With XP, one way to do that is by booting into the Windows install disk, opening a repair console (which looks like a DOS prompt), and using the fixmbr command. That will reinstall the Windows boot manager in the MBR for you. See this page I found with a quick Google Search for how that works:

http://pcsupport.about.com/od/fixthe.../repairmbr.htm

Basically, you're just opening a Recovery Console after booting into an XP install disk and typing fixmbr at the prompt (that will write a new Master Boot Record on your boot drive if a different drive is not specified).

Or, if you want to remove Mepis, you could install a different Linux distribution and let it update the MBR with a boot manager that points to the partition the new Linux distro is on. Basically, GRUB is pointing to /etc/boot/menu.lst to give the boot choices (it's a text file it uses with operating system names and locations in it). So, if you delete the partition that file is on, your GRUB boot manager no longer works (and you'd need to install a new boot manager or let windows reinstall it's boot manager in the MBR for you by using fixmbr from a recovery console.

Have you got a good backup of your installation? If not, you may want to make one before you get started. Then, what I'd suggest doing is doing the partitioning steps I outlined above and rebooting back into Windows XP. XP will probably want to run a chkdsk on the drive at that point because it wonders why the partition size changed.

Then, boot back into the Mepis DVD again and backup the MBR on both sda and sdb (saving files that contain them on your external 1TB drive). The reason I'd backup both is because something is odd if you say your Windows is installed on sdb (the 250GB drive), since the larger drive is showing up as sda (first drive in the system). Then (with backups of your MBR that you can restore later), you wouldn't need a Windows boot disk to go back to using the default Windows boot setup later (since you could just restore the MBR yourself from the backup you make). IOW, you wouldn't need to worry about running fixmbr to go back to your old boot setup later if you ever decided to.

The easy way to back them up to click on the icon for your 1TB external drive from Dolphin (file cabinet icon) after you boot into a Mepis DVD. That will mount the NTFS partition on it (so that you don't have to use mount commands like we were doing earlier). Then, open Konsole and type this to see how it shows up. If you unplug your card reader, it should show up as sdc.

su
fdisk -l

Then, assuming your external drive is sdc, do this to backup the first 512 bytes on the drive (which contains the master boot record with the boot manager and partition table)

su
dd if=/dev/sda of=/mnt/sdc1/sda_mbr.img bs=512 count=1
dd if=/dev/sdb of=/mnt/sdc1/sdb_mbr.img bs=512 count=1

Then, I'd reboot into the DVD again (Start Menu>Leave>Restart PC) before installing Mepis, and don't start up any applications or click on anything before using the Install icon to launch the installer. That way, you'll have more memory for it, and you won't have any drives that are mounted (as I have seen issues before running the installer with mounted drives).

Then, if you ever wanted to restore the MBRs later, without overwriting your partition tables (just in case you changed anything since the backup), you could do this after booting into a Mepis DVD and clicking on your external drive to mount it (and I'd make sure the backup files you named sda_mbr.img and sdb_mbr.img and saved to it are still there before running these commands). This assumes it shows up as sdc using fdisk -l

su
dd if=/mnt/sdc1/sda_mbr.img of=/dev/sda bs=446 count=1
dd if=/mnt/sdc1/sdb_mbr.img of=/dev/sdb bs=446 count=1

Edit/Added.

OK, I just noticed this part in a previous post:

Quote:
Originally Posted by livinggourmand View Post
...Jim this is not my own PC i use my uncle's system...
my pc dosnt hav net...
but yeah u can post abt that mepis set up...(which i ll try on my pc)
So, the above information does not apply. :-)

I need to know how your PC is setup if that's the one we're installing it on (so I can give you more specific instructions on partitioning). What Operating System is on it now? That part is important (if it's Vista or Windows 7 versus XP, we approach the partitioning differently).

How much memory is installed in it? Although it can run it a bit less when a swap partition is defined, you really want at least 1GB for Mepis 11, as it's KDE 4 setup uses more resources compared to some of the other Linux distros around with lighter desktops. So, if it doesn't have 1GB or more memory installed, you'll probably want to install a different Linux distribution. So, let me know what's installed in it.

You'll also need to boot into a Mepis DVD for me, open Konsole and type this so I can see how the disks in it are partitioned:

su
fdisk -l
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