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Old Apr 28, 2004, 3:26 PM   #1
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Default Anyone else have this problem?

When working in Photoshop CS, I take my 8-bit jpgs from the camera, convert them to 16-bit so I get better color adjustments, and usually have 4-5 adjustment layers & masks and stuff. However, some areas where one channel is clipped do wierd things. Like if the red channel is maxed out at 255 (or its 16bit equivalent) then all of the sudden the red channel for those pixels goes to 0, resulting in cyan pixels. I can only see it if I zoom in past 50%, but when I mouse over the pixels the info screen indeed shows the red is gone. Let me show you what I mean.

This morning I finally figured a way around it, after several months of frustration. (BTW, Adobe's Tech support is a ripoff - no toll free support for a product I paid big bucks for, I have to call long distance) and the "free" tech support only lasts a little while, then they want more $$$ for ech support.)
Anyway, I digress. I discovered that if I convert back to 8-bit before I flatten the image instead of after, the wierd pixels go away. I still think this is a product defect and Adobe should fix it.
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Old Apr 29, 2004, 6:33 PM   #2
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I'm just guessing here, so read with that in mind. I've never experienced this, but I'm taking my photos in 16-bit mode RAW. My guess is that your problem may stem from trying to turn 8 bits into 16. Like I said, though, it's just a guess.
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Old Apr 29, 2004, 6:36 PM   #3
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I tend to agree with Barbara here. I don't think you're gaining any advantage converting to 16 bit from 8 bit as the software is having to add to something that isn't there. This may be what causes your color shifts. Like Barbara, I'm only guessing here.
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Old Apr 30, 2004, 3:53 PM   #4
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I actually got the idea of converting to 16-bit for retouching from the Adobe guy running the Adobe booth at the WPPI convention. FYI, I normally shoot in RAW outdoors, at weddings, and other places where the lighting is less predictable and I only have one shot at getting a good picture. I shoot in 8-bit JPG only in the studio where I have carefully controlled and metered lighting so I usually have a good exposure from the start.
Anyway, if I start out with an 8bit jpg and then adjust levels and saturation and do vignetting and stuff, it shows a bit of banding. The histogram has a comb effect afterward. If I convert to 16 bit, make adjustments, and convert back, there is no banding and the histogram is smooth. That's why I do it.
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Old Apr 30, 2004, 6:22 PM   #5
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Interesting. I wouldn't have thought that would work well. Goes to show you what I know
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