Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Software > Editors (Photoshop, Vegas, Final Cut Pro, Kdenlive, etc.)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 10, 2005, 10:42 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Tom Overton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,458
Default

Hello, Photoshop Gurus;

I'm trying to do something in Elements version 2 which is probably really easy, but I don't know if what I'm doing is correct. What I want is to apply an adjustment layer, levels to be exact, as a gradient across an image.

How I've tried this is: 1 - I created an ajustment layer to set levels. 2 - I aligned this with the appropriate layer. 3 - I then created a gradient adjustment layer, which I aligned with the levels layer.... 4 - I'm stuck. I've tried changing the blending to overlay or other options, but I'm pretty sure this has nothing to do with the levels layer I am trying to blend.

Any solutions?

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
Tom Overton is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 11, 2005, 7:25 AM   #2
Member
 
BrianP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 76
Default

Tom
You were almost there - it's actually more simple!
1 Create and adjust the adjustment layer.
2 Draw your gradient directly across the layer (ie, with the adjustment layer selected in the layers pallette).
The most useful gradient to use is 'Foreground to Transparent' with the foreground set to Black - where the layer is filled with black you can 'see through' it, ie the adjustment will not take effect. You can also use the Brush tool to paint out the adjustment on, say, a face, or Edit>Fill with black and paint it back in with white.
At all times you are painting directly onto the adjustment layer.
This is one of the most powerful features of Photoshop, and it's worth spending time mastering it.

Brian

Brian
BrianP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 11, 2005, 11:36 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Tom Overton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,458
Default

BrianP wrote:
Quote:
Tom
You were almost there - it's actually more simple!
1 Create and adjust the adjustment layer.
2 Draw your gradient directly across the layer (ie, with the adjustment layer selected in the layers pallette).
The most useful gradient to use is 'Foreground to Transparent' with the foreground set to Black - where the layer is filled with black you can 'see through' it, ie the adjustment will not take effect. You can also use the Brush tool to paint out the adjustment on, say, a face, or Edit>Fill with black and paint it back in with white.
At all times you are painting directly onto the adjustment layer.
This is one of the most powerful features of Photoshop, and it's worth spending time mastering it.

Brian
Thanks, Brian. I completely spaced on the idea that the adjustment layer can be used in this way. I'm kicking myself thinking of the number of times I tried to do other adjusments while still in an adjustment layer and having to re-do the work. I had done "Foreground to Transparent"with the foreground set to neutral grey. I'll try it with black now.

Thanks again.

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
Tom Overton is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:10 PM.