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Old Aug 7, 2005, 6:05 PM   #1
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What software do others use to file their digital pictures? I use Jasc Paint Shop Pro 8 and Photo Album 5 to view and edit my pictures and like it very much

My sister gave me a copy of her Photo Shop elements 3.0 which says it does a data file, by tagging the pictures. I've only played with this a little and it seems complicated?? Should I use this?

Another friend said he uses Thumbs UP, but he hasn't used anything else and I'm not sure if I should just buy it and tried to figure out how to use another program.

At first my file system seems fine, different folders and subfolders, which is very easy to view a picture on my computer. But nowI now have a lot of pictures.

Backing up is a problem, I'd like to only backup the newest by date, but I have to open every folder to find the newest date since the last back. I have 2 external hard drives to back them onto.

Thanks for any advice you have.

Shirley






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Old Aug 24, 2005, 11:50 AM   #2
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I use two photo editing tools. Photo Shop CS for really advance editing, such as CMYK conversions etc. and I recently purchased Visualizer Photo Resize Pro, which I find suitable for my needs, as it offers quick viewing, editing, batch resizing and includes the option to generate web albums, all built into an easy-to-use software - and for what it has to offer it is quite cheap.

There is a Free version of the software which you can download from their website:
http://www.freeimagebrowser.com/

Maybe this can help you with your back-ups as well.

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Old Sep 27, 2005, 12:21 PM   #3
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I have 99% jpgs, so I like organizers that store the categorization in the jpg tags. That way, if the database gets corrupted, or if I copy/rename/move the jpg, all my categorization remains. Most major programs do not utilize tags for cataloging but rely solely on an external database.

www.brilliantlabs.com is great, but support and updates have been sporadic lately. The author (1 man company) is promising a new version.

I currently use Microsoft Digital Image Suite 2006. Demo is at...

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...displaylang=en

It uses EXIF tag info for cataloging, monitors folders for changes, and has an editing app included. I think it is the best available now.

As opposed to Adobe, ACDSee, Corel, if you "lose" your external database you can simply re-read your files and your tags are still there!!






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Old Sep 28, 2005, 11:29 AM   #4
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Many pros and advanced amateurs with lots of images to catalog consider IMatch to be without equal (it's a very highly recommended software package for this purpose).

But, there are a number of other products (many free) that can serve a similar purpose.

Even Picasa (now provided by Google for free) is well liked by many users for browsing and organizing their images.

Some users like something like Kodak's Easyshare to organize their photos.

There are many ways to do it, and I see that others have made some suggestions, too.

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Old Sep 28, 2005, 3:14 PM   #5
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I have found that filing my originals by date, including the date in the photo name when it is edited (e.g., AuntEmma050723), and keeping a simple diary is enough to find my photos. As an example, if I am looking for a photo of an animal taken on a trip to the zoo, a simple search of the diary for "zoo" will get me the date and thus the location.

You might find one of the software packages usefull, but keep in mind that there is a cood chance of becoming obsolete and unreadable in a few years. A diary in ASCII should be able to be read by any system that can read the media it is on.
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Old Sep 28, 2005, 4:17 PM   #6
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I try to keep mine semi-organized via directory structures, where the directory (a.k.a., folder) names include the date I upload them (although my PC leaves a lot to be desired in this area). ;-)

I'm starting to use yyyymmdd for this structure lately (although I've got folders using yymmdd, too (old habit, for better compatibility with programs that don't like long file names). It could use a bit of cleanup right this minute.

I use the upload date since sometimes I may shoot some photos here and there for a week before transferring the images from a card, and it's just my little system for finding stuff by date.

If the photos are something more special (birthday party, etc.), then I may or may not have versions of the photos with new names more specific to the event if I do some edits. I may have a bunch of subdirectories under an upload date folder with the event names as part of the subdirectory name (RobertPartyEdit1, RobertPartyEdit2, RobertPartyPrint4_6 (after cropping for 4x6" prints), etc.

I haven't tried Bill's suggestion of adding the date to the filenames of the photos, too.

But, that sounds like a good idea to me.

Try Picasa if you get a chance (it's free). It found a bunch of images on my hard drives that I had forgotten about. LOL It's layout makes it extremely simple to scroll through a lot of albums quickly and it will autoindex everything on your drive in the directories (folders) you tell it to index. I let it do everything first, then kept it to one directory (and subdirectories) after that.

For example, I've got the options in mine setup to automatically include everything under c:\photos (and I've got my other subdirectories by date under there). Then, we I add anything new under that directory, it automatically indexes it and includes it in the views you get.

I don't use it for much (and I haven't tried it's other cataloging features yet). But, it's nice for browing through a bunch of folders quickly (with no need to actually select the folders if they're already indexed), and it's got some basic editing features, too (cropping, contrast, color correction, rotation, etc.).


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Old Sep 28, 2005, 4:53 PM   #7
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BillDrew wrote:
Quote:
A diary in ASCII should be able to be read by any system that can read the media it is on.
I worked for a provider of Retail Information Systems for a couple of years, managing the Consulting Services Group in one of their branches.

We had to develop customized versions of our software for new customers, and this often meant interfacing with a wide variety of systems used by these customers.

We also had our own "back end" communications going on (for data updates to and from a customer's headquarters, store locations, warehouse locations, etc.).

Even though there are more elaborate ways of interfancing systems, the preferred way was a simple flat file (text, sometimes with delimiters of some type, sometimes not).

It's more compatible with more systems than anything else. Since you'll always find programmers that deal with a system that can write an interface if they only know what's supposed to be in the file, and where it's supposed to be. Then, there is no need for file drivers specific to anything other than plain text.

Of course, the actual databases used by these systems used a variety of formats. :-)

But, yea, these applications are typically going to be using some type of indexed file structure (maybe proprietary, maybe a common commercial backend with drivers readily available).

But, years from now, some of them may or may not be easily readable, especially if the company goes out of business and they used a less common (or proprietary) file type or database for the image information you use for cataloging (and never published any specs on the structure they used to store the data).



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Old Sep 29, 2005, 9:02 AM   #8
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Putting the date into the edited photo name is probably more important for those who are not yet familiar with photo editing. later, when they find that they could have done a better job (garish colors, sharpening artifacts, a branch growing out of Uncle Fred's ear, ...) it is easy to find the original image and start over.
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