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Old Oct 27, 2005, 10:22 PM   #1
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Is there any good resons to shoot raw or is the maximum quality other than raw good enough?

I know raw takes up a lot of space so why should I use it? Help!
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Old Oct 28, 2005, 3:02 AM   #2
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It really depends on the situation you find yourself in.

As you know, raw files are larger, so you need more memory,and tend to be slower writing to the card.

When you take a photo, your camera will in fact shoot in raw format, whatever the setting, but then it is immediately converted to jpg if you chose that setting. Along with any sharpening, colour settings, white balance etc, etc.

During the conversion you will also lose a fair bit of data.

The advantages include the fact that the image data is in it's rawest form, before any in camera processing is done. You will have every scrap of information as seen by the sensor. You may well have seen the term 'digital negative'. That's what a raw file is. Actually, any file can be called this before any processing has been done but essentially the raw file has had nothing done to it, so is more of a digital negative.

You will have the ability to 'bring out' the shadows a lot better, compensate for exposure problems, set the white balance, remove colour casts and so much more.

Put simply, you can rescue a raw file a darn sight easier than you could a jpg !! But it also involves a bit more in the way of post processing. With the raw file, then once it is converted you will likely still need to play with the file.

Which takes me back to my first statement. If you are taking shots that are of the utmost importance, for example, a wedding or other very special occasion, then it is better to shoot raw. It may well save your images if things go wrong. And they can go wrong as anyone will tell you.

Most, if not all, professional photographers will shoot raw. For weddings, commercial advertising, studio work and the like. I believe though that press photographers are not so fussy about raw, as speed, in terms of shot to publication, is of the essence.

I suggest you take a few shots of the same subjects, in raw and jpg. Process them and see if you can see the difference.

In general though, most cameras are more than capable of producing excellent results using jpg and I tend to do as I said and shoot raw on special occasions, just in case.

That's my take on it, hope it helps.

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Old Oct 28, 2005, 3:56 AM   #3
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When I have problems in low light such as in gyms shooting basketball would it be any help to shoot in raw? In your opinion.
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Old Oct 28, 2005, 4:52 AM   #4
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Raw can do wonders. But it can't perform miracles .

It may help with minor exposure problems, but in situations such as that, you really need light.

Be it from the surrounding, off camera flash, or, if you have a Dslr, a brighter lens would benefit.

I don't have a dslr, nor do I shoot in those circumstances, so have little knowledge as to what would be best for you.

Hopefully someone will come in and be able to assist you further.

I suggest you take a look in theSports and Action forum, here at Steve's.

See what they are taking and how.
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Old Nov 6, 2005, 5:45 PM   #5
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Nice thing about editing RAW format is that the edits are non-destructive.

You can make a couple of diffierent crops and corrections and your original image stays intact.

You can probably correct for up to one stop of underexposure without it looking obvious in your finished result.

Two stops of exposure, however, and you can see that level of correction.

Nice thing about RAW is also correcting the contrast, to make the shot more punchy.

Also, you can cut some pretty big JPEGS from a RAW file, which will print real nice. I can cut a 5mb jpeg from my 8mbRAW file, should be able to print an 11x14 off that easy.

Try RAWSHOOTER, it's free and it's a pretty good editor.

-- Terry



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Old Nov 26, 2005, 2:49 PM   #6
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Old Nov 26, 2005, 2:53 PM   #7
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Raw is the eqivalent of a film negative. No post processing has been done by the camera what so ever, thus allowing you the total control in Post Processing. Raw format is also a non-compressed format which enhances total quality.

I would strongly encourage you to capture your images in the RAW format and then do the post processing in Photoshop using the Raw conversion filter. I really believe your end results will be much better.


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