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Old Mar 15, 2006, 12:50 PM   #1
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Whan i took a photo with my Konica Minolta A-200 digital camera in Hi-res (8.0 mp, extra fine) the photo is still in 72 dpi. Somebody can tell me why?? My old camera, a Nykon coolpix 800 (2.0 mp) take photos in low resolution, but in 300 dpi. I don't understand.
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Old Mar 15, 2006, 5:16 PM   #2
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Don't worry about it. All your resolution is still there. When you open an image in an editor it has to display at some resolution setting. Files from some makes of cameras seem to open up by default at 72ppi.

My Nikon opens up in Photoshop at 300ppi with a document size of something like 6x7 inches. My uncle's Fuji opens up at 72ppi but with a document size of something like 24x28 inches! If I changed the resolution setting on my Nikon pix without any resampling, I'd get a document (printed) size of somewhere around 24x28 inches.

Stuff like ppi & dpi don't have much meaning until you output the image -- then it matters a great deal because the relationship between resolution and document size governs the size and quality of a print, whether you print it directly or post it electronically for someone else to print.

I just realized that I never really answered the question asked in the subject line, so...

DPI is "dots per square inch" which is really a reference to the dots that a printer puts on paper. PPI is "pixels per square inch" and refers to the smallest building blocks that make up a digital image. DPI and PPI are not the same thing even though the terms are sometimes used interchangably. Unless a pixel is pure black or pure white, it takes at least three printer-dots to represent one pixel. That's why printer resolution has to be so much higher than camera resolution.

Image resolution (ppi) contains all the image information, so the higher the image ppi the lager a print you can make at any given quality. If you print smaller, this tells the printer to print the pixels closer together and you get a finer print resolution. If you print larger, it tells the printer to print the pixels farther apart and the picture has a courser print resolution. Of course, you could view the larger print from farther away and it would look just as good from that distance as the smaller print would look from closer up if they were were both printed at the same resolution. But ppi is the basic indicator of how large you can print and still have acceptable detail.

Grant
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Old Mar 15, 2006, 8:17 PM   #3
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Ok, thanks a lot. Your answer was pretty good to me, and nowi understand better all the concepts. Thanks!!!!!
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Old Mar 15, 2006, 8:35 PM   #4
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Good answer, but I always thought DPI/PPI were linear measures. Doesn't change the point of your answer - that DPI/PPIhave nomeaning until you print, and then they determine the size of the print.

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... DPI is "dots per square inch" which is really a reference to the dots that a printer puts on paper. PPI is "pixels per square inch" ...
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Old Mar 16, 2006, 10:28 PM   #5
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Yeah, Mr. Drew, I believe you're right. So many things are measured by the square inch, yard or what-have-you, that I just wrote it that way through reflex.

Viva peer review! It keeps everyone honest!

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