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Old Jun 12, 2006, 5:56 AM   #1
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I presently own a Nikon D50 and shoot mostly in JPEG with little to no post-processing. The odd post-processing may include some mild sharpening in Photoshop CS2. I print all my own pics on either a Canon IP5200 (inkjet) for my 8x10 pics and a Canon CP710 (dye-sub) for my 4x6 pics.

What's the difference between sRGB and AdobeRGB? Would it matter in my case?

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Old Jun 12, 2006, 1:44 PM   #2
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Here's a nice general discussion of the two color spaces, FWIW: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...obeRGB1998.htm


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Old Jun 12, 2006, 6:46 PM   #3
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IMHO, keep it simple: use sRGB as that is what the net and most consumer printers use/are capable of and printed output is excellent. Very expensive, appropriateequipment with expensive investments and a strong desire and deep pocketbook for theoretical perfection ... then aRGB isbetter; but if you cannot reproduce it with the equipment you have available to you, you will be dissatisfied. Read about it here http://www.smugmug.com/help/srgb-versus-adobe-rgb-1998in a very understandable way.

I like this quote from that site: "The practical reality is the web can only display sRGB files and 99% of commercial prints are produced through labs that expect sRGB files."
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Old Jun 14, 2006, 10:11 AM   #4
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hgernhardtjr wrote:
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IMHO, keep it simple: use sRGB as that is what the net and most consumer printers use/are capable of and printed output is excellent. Very expensive, appropriate equipment with expensive investments and a strong desire and deep pocketbook for theoretical perfection ... then aRGB is better; but if you cannot reproduce it with the equipment you have available to you, you will be dissatisfied. Read about it here http://www.smugmug.com/help/srgb-versus-adobe-rgb-1998 in a very understandable way.

I like this quote from that site: "The practical reality is the web can only display sRGB files and 99% of commercial prints are produced through labs that expect sRGB files."
Your printer cannot come close to reprodcuing sRGB. Your printer can simulate about 200,000 colors.

The advantage of Adobe RGB lies in the post processing, where you start with a wider color gamut.

If your Service Bureau cannot handle aRGB, there's no law that prohibits you, AFTER post processing from converting to sRGB. If you do this use the "conversion" option rather then the "assign" profile option.

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Old Jun 19, 2006, 12:24 AM   #5
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Adobe RGB is only good if you are editing your photos in Adobe. Most other Windows software and devices (printers) prefer to see a sRGB image for colour matching (ICM). Also the same applies to print

labs(non-professional) and instant print booths, better results will be obtained with sRGB. If you shoot in RAW mode then the profile can be changed at the point of conversion so you can do either/both.

Publishing pictures to the web is also better in sRGB, also sending picture discs to friends are better in sRGB. It all depends on what you are going to do with the pictures you take which colour profile will suit you best.

Adobe RGB has a wider colour space than sRGB, quote Adobe: "The larger the RGB working space, the farther apart each color value would be from its nearest neighbor." which comes down to Adobe RGB has a broader range of colours. This means that your images are truer in colour shading but the difference is very difficult to see with the naked eye. If you are taking pictures with the intent to only edit/print in Adobe applications then Adobe RGB is your preference.

Adobe RGB images straight out of the camera will look less colourful/contrasted than sRGB images when viewed in standard Windows applications. The same applies to printing these images using Standard printer profiles which expect/prefer to see an sRGB image.
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Old Jun 19, 2006, 12:31 PM   #6
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jtgraphics wrote:
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Adobe RGB is only good if you are editing your photos in Adobe. Most other Windows software and devices (printers) prefer to see a sRGB image for colour matching (ICM). Also the same applies to print

labs(non-professional) and instant print booths, better results will be obtained with sRGB. If you shoot in RAW mode then the profile can be changed at the point of conversion so you can do either/both.

Publishing pictures to the web is also better in sRGB, also sending picture discs to friends are better in sRGB. It all depends on what you are going to do with the pictures you take which colour profile will suit you best.

Adobe RGB has a wider colour space than sRGB, quote Adobe: "The larger the RGB working space, the farther apart each color value would be from its nearest neighbor." which comes down to Adobe RGB has a broader range of colours. This means that your images are truer in colour shading but the difference is very difficult to see with the naked eye. If you are taking pictures with the intent to only edit/print in Adobe applications then Adobe RGB is your preference.

Adobe RGB images straight out of the camera will look less colourful/contrasted than sRGB images when viewed in standard Windows applications. The same applies to printing these images using Standard printer profiles which expect/prefer to see an sRGB image.
Some of your comments are correct. As time goes on more and more applications accept Adobe RGB. Generally the process is transparent.

I have no problem whatsoever printing out from aRGB. As with all printing, a certain amount of work should be done by the USER, as opposed to relying on any profile supplied by the manufacturer.

But I have no problem with what is your essentailly, "better safe than sorry" approach to this problem. Indeed a dramatic proof of that I can completley verify. I have an OLD program that makes wonderful JPEG's, and forgetting all about color space, I loaded my Photoshop images in, forgetting how old the program was - and the results were bad...

Shooting and post processing in Adobe RGB will give you a better image, even if you convert to sRGB when the post processing is over.

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