Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Software > Editors (Photoshop, Vegas, Final Cut Pro, Kdenlive, etc.)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 15, 2006, 11:23 AM   #1
PdS
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 18
Default

Which goes first in order to preserve as much information as possible?
Thanks in advance.
Pablo
PdS is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 16, 2006, 12:32 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 804
Default

I would apply the local contrast ehancement first. Image sharpening, through whatever method, is usually recommended to be the final step in your post processing before outputting to a printer or the web.

Grant
granthagen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 16, 2006, 8:32 AM   #3
PdS
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 18
Default

Grant
Thanks for your advise.
As you quote, sharpening is recommended to be the final step for image manipulation. My doubt is that both, USM and Local Contrast Enhancement, use the same tool just applying different values therefore both process are supposed to degrade image quality.
Is there a way to apply both filters in a single step to minimize image detail damage?
Thanks in advance.
Pablo
PdS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 17, 2006, 12:56 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 804
Default

Sorry, PdS. I don't think that it's possible.

Just an opinion, but I think that you are being over-concerned about loss of image detail. Technically speaking, USM might be said to degrade image detail by introducing contrast that was not in the original. But, these little contrast outlines give the viewer the illusion of greater image detail! The original data, by cetain standards might be slightly corrupted, but the effect on the viewer is just the opposite! And, since the purpose of a photograph is to serve the pleasure of the human eye, then I don't really think that the proper application of USM -- or any other tool that alters the original image so as to better please the human eye -- can really be called a loss!

If you are really concerned over this, there are ways to apply USM for sharpening that minimize the production of color halos, and such. If you have Photoshop, you can convert your image to LAB color, select channels on the layer palette and apply USM only on the lightness channel. As a general thing, you can even apply a greater degree of sharpening as you would with the RGB color space because you don't get color halos.

You can do something similar in RGB mode by applying USM in the normal way and then going to EDIT>FADE UNSHARP MASK>BLEND MODE>LUMINENCE.

You can also try High Pass sharpening which also produces less artifacts than regular USM. Check out this link for a tutorial: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...arpening.shtml

I hope some of this is of use to you!

Grant
granthagen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 21, 2006, 11:03 AM   #5
PdS
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 18
Default

Grant
I guess you are right on your comments. Nevertheless I think that a appropriate post processing workflow will help you achieving better results on image enhancing. I guess this is important due to I'm not a PS guy and it is not my intention to become one. I prefer to spend my (rare) spare time shooting rather than editing.

PS: Thanks for the high pass sharpening link.
Pablo
PdS is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:34 AM.