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Old Aug 11, 2006, 8:06 PM   #1
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I shoot a lot of birds through windows and I know it would look better if I didn't have the window but....

So with that said is there anything I can do in PSE to remove the haze caused by the window?

Any ideas would be helpful.
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Old Aug 11, 2006, 8:43 PM   #2
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Just play around with the levels sliders a little bit. Level plus a little unsharp mask:


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Old Aug 11, 2006, 8:45 PM   #3
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That turned out nice.

Can you tell me how you got that to work?

What settings you ended up with? I really struggle with knowing how much to adjust.
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Old Aug 11, 2006, 8:52 PM   #4
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Had to do it again real quick.

Adjusted input levels to 37,1.00,255

Unsharp mask: amount 100%, radius 1.5, threshold 4

The unsharp mask may need adjusted when working with the original image

That should get you close to the first try.
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Old Aug 11, 2006, 9:23 PM   #5
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Thank You
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Old Aug 11, 2006, 9:58 PM   #6
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Photoshop makes quite a good job of removing haze caused by a window, but if the haze is caused by reflections from the window glass, it can help to use a polarising filter on your camera. You have to rotate the filter to get it to the position where it works best.

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Old Aug 11, 2006, 11:57 PM   #7
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Also, use a lens shade (if you have one), keep the shade or lens flat to the glass, no angles.
Wipe the glass clean of any muck too.
Don't use flash and shield any excessive light from the side(s) by holding your hand in the way.

Failing that, use Levels and sharpening
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Old Aug 12, 2006, 12:18 AM   #8
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As for levels....the numbers CanonFodder gave are spot on for this image.

But you don't need to worry about calculating any settings for other images, just drag the outer sliders in, if necessary, to meet the edge of the histogram. That's what CanonFodder did

The first port of call for most images should be Levels.
Adjustment can correct the majority of images and in fact they will benefit greatly.

The midtone slider adjusts the gamma, so you can affect the brightness of the image.
Just remember that for most images, bring the outer sliders in and play with the middle one till you see what you like.

That's the general way to use it, but you can move the sliders further in if you wish to have a little more contrast.
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Old Aug 12, 2006, 1:13 PM   #9
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Stevekin -

I'd never understood how to use levels before and had given up trying. But using it the way you've described I've found it works really well - and a lot quicker than fiddling around separately with brightness & contrast in Photoshop Elements and with gamma in ACDSee 3.0. Thanks for the explanation.

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