Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Flash (External)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 15, 2007, 8:59 PM   #1
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 21,342
Default

This subject comes up from time to time, and VTphotog suggested a sticky post about it. So, I've added this one to the announcements posts you'll find at the top of the threads list in this forum.

If you want to use an external flash (other than what the camera manufacturer recommends for your camera model), it's best to find out what it's trigger voltage is, and what the camera manufacturer's specifications for the hotshoe allows for a maximum trigger voltage to prevent damage to the camera's electronics.

Note that the maximum trigger voltage allowed for a hotshoe may be very different compared to what a camera allows via a PC Sync port.

You can find some information on user reported trigger voltages here:

http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html

It's best to measure any flash you consider using a high impendence digital volt meter. You can find instructions on measuring trigger voltage on this page:

http://www.botzilla.com/photo/g1strobe.html

Some manufacturers don't publish information on the maximum trigger voltage allowed. But, I've seen it reported that KM and Sony models have a hotshoe that is expecting trigger voltage at TTL Level. So, it's best to stay at around 6 volts with them.

The same applies to Canon models (it's best to stay with a flash that has a lower trigger voltage).

It's my understanding that Nikon DSLR models have a hotshoe rated at up to 250 volts.

If you've asked a manufacturer about trigger voltage limits and received a reply, feel free to post it to this thread.

If you have an older model flash with a higher trigger voltage and want to be safer mounting it in your camera's hotshoe, there are adapters available that can reduce the trigger voltage seen by the camera. One such device is the Wein Safe Sync.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 13, 2007, 1:35 PM   #2
Member
 
henryp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 59
Default



Wein Safe-Sync Hot Shoe to Hot Shoe High Voltage Sync Regulator (SSHSHS)
Mfr# W990560

The Wein Safe-Sync Hot Shoe to Hot Shoe (SSHSHS) regulates and reduces the flash sync voltage of the flash from up to 400V to less than 6V. This is especially important for current automated SLRs or digital cameras when used with older flashes or lighting systems.
This model mounts directly to a camera's hot shoe and provides a hot shoe on top and a PC female flash connection on the side. You can have a flash connected to the hot shoe and a flash being triggered by the PC female connection-and unlike so many other offerings of this type, both will fire simultaneously from the same signal.
Paramount http://www.paramountcords.com/vp.asp also makes a range of sync cords with in-line voltage filters.

--
Henry Posner
B&H Photo-Video

henryp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2008, 1:11 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
geriatric's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 326
Default

A bit of know how and you can make a safe sync very cheaply. Paramount cords show one for a studio flash, which is easier still to make.
geriatric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31, 2008, 8:59 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
wise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 403
Default

Hi all,

I asked this question with appropriately named therad but did not get any replies. Since you guys seem to know somthing about using one dedicated flash with another camera, can you please tell me if it is possible to Use Nikon SB600 flash with My Panasonic FZ20?

hanks are in advance.

w
wise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 29, 2008, 3:58 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 2
Default

liketaking Macro photographs and previously used a Starblitz 1000 macro ringflash on my Minolta 800si film SLR without any problems.

However - I have just bought a Pentax K10D and tried to use the Starblitz ring flash after attaching a hotshoe adapter with PC Sync to the camera. The result being the flash does not fire :sad:.

A friend brought along an old Minolta flash gun, I attached this to the PC Sync adpater and it fired. So I measured the trigger voltage on both flash guns. The StarBlitz was measuring 3.5 V whilst the Minolta measured 40 V.

Is it possible that the voltage of the StarBlitz is too low for the Pentax K10D circuitry to detect and thus it does not fire?

I did click on the link provided on this topic and found the flash gun I use, and someone stated it had a trigger voltage of 6.8V, could it be that my flashgun is faulty?

Best Regards,

Paul




PAO1972 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 30, 2008, 8:30 AM   #6
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 21,342
Default

See if it will fire when you short between the center pin and outside of the flash foot (and/or see if it still fires on a different camera).

If not, the flash is probably defective.

If it will fire when you complete the circuit between the center pin and outside of the foot, then the flash is working and you've got a compatibility issue with the camera (for example, it may not be closing the circuit long enough for the flash to recognize it and fire).
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 11, 2008, 4:19 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 3
Default

PAO1972 wrote:
Quote:
liketaking Macro photographs and previously used a Starblitz 1000 macro ringflash on my Minolta 800si film SLR without any problems.

However - I have just bought a Pentax K10D and tried to use the Starblitz ring flash after attaching a hotshoe adapter with PC Sync to the camera. The result being the flash does not fire :sad:.

A friend brought along an old Minolta flash gun, I attached this to the PC Sync adpater and it fired. So I measured the trigger voltage on both flash guns. The StarBlitz was measuring 3.5 V whilst the Minolta measured 40 V.

Is it possible that the voltage of the StarBlitz is too low for the Pentax K10D circuitry to detect and thus it does not fire?

I did click on the link provided on this topic and found the flash gun I use, and someone stated it had a trigger voltage of 6.8V, could it be that my flashgun is faulty?

Best Regards,

Paul
Quote:
Thetrigger voltage in the flashgun is shorted to ground by the camera putting a negative going voltage spike in the trigger transformer.I have used 2.5-3v with no bother.



decrepit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 17, 2009, 2:57 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 11
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
This subject comes up from time to time, and VTphotog suggested a sticky post about it. So, I've added this one to the announcements posts you'll find at the top of the threads list in this forum.

If you want to use an external flash (other than what the camera manufacturer recommends for your camera model), it's best to find out what it's trigger voltage is, and what the camera manufacturer's specifications for the hotshoe allows for a maximum trigger voltage to prevent damage to the camera's electronics.

Note that the maximum trigger voltage allowed for a hotshoe may be very different compared to what a camera allows via a PC Sync port.

You can find some information on user reported trigger voltages here:

http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html

It's best to measure any flash you consider using a high impendence digital volt meter. You can find instructions on measuring trigger voltage on this page:

http://www.botzilla.com/photo/g1strobe.html

Some manufacturers don't publish information on the maximum trigger voltage allowed. But, I've seen it reported that KM and Sony models have a hotshoe that is expecting trigger voltage at TTL Level. So, it's best to stay at around 6 volts with them.

The same applies to Canon models (it's best to stay with a flash that has a lower trigger voltage).

It's my understanding that Nikon DSLR models have a hotshoe rated at up to 250 volts.

If you've asked a manufacturer about trigger voltage limits and received a reply, feel free to post it to this thread.

If you have an older model flash with a higher trigger voltage and want to be safer mounting it in your camera's hotshoe, there are adapters available that can reduce the trigger voltage seen by the camera. One such device is the Wein Safe Sync.
Thing seem to getting a bit better nowadays. Canon 5D say you can put up to 250v on the PC terminal, but not on the hotshoe. The leaders in this are Fuji have always said up to 400v on their cameras. Now that rings a bell, 400v is the max volts for most SCR`s.
oldfella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 3, 2010, 9:16 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 23
Default

Jim -- it has been a while since I was on this Forum but I have to thank it for directing to select what I did. Now after 3 (or so) years of use my Canon Rebel TXi's flash gave up the ghost yesterday in front of a pumpkin. Any pointers on what my next step should be? Is this come thing the local repair shop (Fox?) could or is it something I need to send back? Or (not much chance of this) is it something I could possibly fix. The camera has 12-15K images taken. Bill
ghpots is offline   Reply With Quote
0
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:49 AM.




SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 RC 2