Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 25, 2013, 11:40 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 25
Default Computer time and Viewing?

I am planning to get a backup computer. For this I have been considering lots of different factor. One of the factors is to do with photos.

1. How much time do photographers spend on the computer fixing/enhancing their photos?

2. Where do photographers prefer to watch their digital photos? Laptop, Big LCD monitor or Huge LED TV?

I would appreciate any input/advice on this subject.

Thank you.
kleanchap is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 25, 2013, 11:58 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,906
Default

1. Overall, not much, but for a 'special' shot, I might take up to a half hour. This is rare, however.
2. Large LCD monitor, calibrated to match printer.
I have done some editing and printing from my laptop, and the results were 'adequate', and acceptable for family snapshot level.

brian
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 25, 2013, 12:32 PM   #3
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,516
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kleanchap View Post
I am planning to get a backup computer. For this I have been considering lots of different factor. One of the factors is to do with photos.

1. How much time do photographers spend on the computer fixing/enhancing their photos?

2. Where do photographers prefer to watch their digital photos? Laptop, Big LCD monitor or Huge LED TV?

I would appreciate any input/advice on this subject.

Thank you.
I guess I have to ask: what difference does it make if someone else spends a lot of time or a little bit of time on the computer? We're not the ones using your computer - YOU are.

As for viewing photos - it isn't just about the photographer - who else views them? For example, myself and my girlfriend will view photos on a large, calibrated monitor. But we'll display them on the TV for others to see and I share with family/friends using a smugmug site. In the past when I did more paid work I would show clients photos on a laptop - which was good enough for the type of work I did.

Now, over the last few years the one thing that was nagging at me was getting my printed photos to look like they did when I edited them. As the other poster suggested - you need a monitor calibrated to the printer to get this.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 25, 2013, 3:31 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
I guess I have to ask: what difference does it make if someone else spends a lot of time or a little bit of time on the computer? We're not the ones using your computer - YOU are.

As for viewing photos - it isn't just about the photographer - who else views them? For example, myself and my girlfriend will view photos on a large, calibrated monitor. But we'll display them on the TV for others to see and I share with family/friends using a smugmug site. In the past when I did more paid work I would show clients photos on a laptop - which was good enough for the type of work I did.

Now, over the last few years the one thing that was nagging at me was getting my printed photos to look like they did when I edited them. As the other poster suggested - you need a monitor calibrated to the printer to get this.
True, I am the one using the computer. However, the photos I am seeing these days are so beautiful and creative. I don’t know if this is due to the photo “as-is” or it was worked on using all the software out there. This means do I have to invest time in learning these tools to make my photos look so good. Or do I focus on photography for “as-as” masterpieces without having to do any editing.
kleanchap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 25, 2013, 4:23 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,906
Default

Many, if not most, of the photos you see have been enhanced considerably from what comes out of the camera. You can, sometimes, get the same effects by increasing color saturation, contrast, and sharpness, in your camera settings. A lot of people use plugins or add - on programs such as from Topaz and others to get the effects they want and save some time.
Framing, composition, and attention to lighting are really what distinguish the 'masterpieces' from ordinary photos. (IMO)

brian
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
0
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:06 AM.




SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 RC 2