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Old Nov 30, 2006, 11:04 AM   #11
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Thanks so much for your help! I am heading out of town to right now to meet my sisters who are going to help me organize the slides and then we will scan, scan, scan!!! I am going to stop at office depot and pick up a flash drive according to your suggestion! Thanks again!
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Old Nov 30, 2006, 11:14 AM   #12
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One last question....(i hope) Can I save the scan directly to the flash drive without putting them on the pc? i will check this site when i get there. Thanks!
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Old Nov 30, 2006, 11:15 PM   #13
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Absolutely. It should show up in Explorer or the "Save as" function of the application as a drive letter and "Removable Drive".

I know you're going to run into slide naming issues, so I'll offer this:

The scanning software automatically assigns a default filename to the scans. The names generated contain incremented numbers, but I found the numbers start over again whenever you turn the scanner on and off. The result is that you can end up with multiple slides trying to use the same name.

I established a file naming convention for the slides. I organized them by year, then month, then date (if possible). I then identified the subject matter (in my case, trips to various places in Europe) and put those groups of slides into separate slide boxes. You could also file them in those transparent 3-ring binder sheets designed to hold slides.

I bought some sticky labels and labelled the boxes. I used the same numbers and subject matter titles to create a directory and sub-directory structure to store the slides in. So on my hard drive I have a folder called "Europe Slides", with subfolders for the various years, and each of those has sub-subfolders for each trip. There are also a few non-year folders such as "Family&Friends", "Unidentified Slides" etc.

This might be enough for you, using the default file names in those folders. But if you ever need to assemble slides from various folders, or need to move any around, you will have collisions between identical filenames.

So I renamed every slide before I stored them. I used AABBXXX where AA=year, BB=month, and XXX is a sequence. There were variations to this because some months had multiple sets of slide taken during the month, so I also used AABBZXX where Z was just a letter sequence of A, B, C etc. This is easy to do because if you click once on an old filename, you need only to increment the bit that's changed.

Trying to name each slide to identify the subject matter will drive you nuts, so you need this extra layer of abstraction to organize them. An advantage is that every one of my slide files has a different "name", and so if someone wants a print or something from a collection, there is only one slide with any given name.

I also set up a spreadsheet to keep track of the filenames, notes written on the slides, and comments on the slides, besides a bunch of other parameters.

Organized this way, I can find any physical slide or scan almost in seconds. Some people advocate using image organizing software, but I've never tried doing that. I think a version of that software comes with the scanner.

Oh, here's another thing. Some people have the impression the scanner selects at random which slide to scan in a batch. (Always do a preview between batches, and after the preview, click on the grid to direct it to scan all the slides in the batch. It defaults to one.) If you load the scanner from the front left corner of the slide holder, to the back left, then front to back down the center row, then front to back of the right row, the scans will come out in the same order you loaded them in.

Yet more things. Most slide mounts are a bit smaller than the openings in the holder. After putting them in, I gently pushed them against the top of the opening, so that the slide would be straight, and the mesy verge of the mount along the sky in scenic shots would be cut off. Put the slides in with the emulsion up. If you reflect light off the sides of the slides, you'll be able to tell which side is rougher, and that's the emulsion side. Even if you get them wrong, you can use the softare to flip them after the scan.
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Old Dec 1, 2006, 9:34 AM   #14
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Once again, thank you for the help. About 6 slides into the scanning I realized that the naming was going to be a HUGE pain. Since it was very late my sister and I decided to get a fresh start this morning. I am sooooo glad to have your advice on the naming and I will begin using your system right away this morning.

We are also scanning lots of pictures of various sizes, quality, etc. I am the one in charge of the slideshow (50th anniversary). Any advice on the size for scanning to make a good show? I also think since I am going to this trouble that I should go ahead and scan them at a large enough file that reprints could be made. (at least a 5X7 reprint)

This is a whole new learning curve for me. I did see that I should save the original scan because of loss of quality in editing. If I just run a couple of edits would this be good enough to save without the additional original? I am not trying to make these perfect at all...just nice enough.

Thanks again.
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Old Dec 1, 2006, 11:22 PM   #15
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You don't have all that many choices about the quality. It boils down to 2400dpi or 4800. I can't judge what level of quality you or your audience appreciates. Bear in mind that your audience will be more interested in the subject matter than the image quality. But quality never hurts.

Once scanned, there's no functional difference whether the images started out as prints or slides.

If you scan at 4800, you no longer need to worry that you could have done them better, because you can't. You could scan one image at both qualities and then magnify them to simulate projecting them, and see if you think the difference is worth the extra scanning time and 4x larger files.

How are you presenting the show? Are you planning to project them using an LCD projector, or on a tv? If it's the latter, you'll either have to copy them to DVD format, using some sort of video editing software, or have some sort of video connection between a computer and the tv.
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