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Old Jan 1, 2007, 9:42 PM   #1
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I've had pretty good luck so far with the permanence of my i950 prints with Canon ink on Photo Paper Pro; on the other hand myoldest prints are only about three years old. My concern is thatone of the latest articles by Wilhelm Research ishighly criical of Canon's newer ChromaPlus 8-ink dye-based ink.

They tested this ink on Canon Photo Paper Pro PR-101glossy and found in a plain glass frame prints should last 6 years and under glass treated for UV - prints should last 8 years; with Canon Matte photo paper prints were estimated to last four more years. A footnote says that the permanence should be even lower because the red (orange) ink fades even faster and is noticeable on skin tones.

I've seen other researchers who claim that these estimates may even be too high.

To make matters even more confusing an earlier Wilhelm article gave Canon BCI-6 ink printed on the same named Photo Paper Pro PR-101 a 38 year print permanence rating.

I've returned to this topic after several years because my i950 printers printhead finally croaked and no cleaning will save it. Given that I have 2+ full sets of ink I hate to give up my investment. I may even buy a IP6000D for about $100, given that it is not much more thana replacement printhead and it uses my older BCI-6 ink. But I would like my prints to last at least 25 years.

I'm curious if the latest Canon dye-based inks that Steve reviewed on Canon's latest Pro printer really last as long as advertised. To be fair Wilhelm rates the newest Canon pigment ink at 100 and 150 years under glass or UV glass respectively.

http://www.wilhelm-research.com/ist/...2006_09_HW.pdf

http://www.wilhelm-research.com/pcwo...r_Nov_2002.pdf
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Old Jan 1, 2007, 11:39 PM   #2
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I've had the same luck as you with prints from my Canon i960, which recently died after over 3 years of wonderful prints, the oldest of which still look as good today as the day they were printed. I replaced the i960 with the IP6700D, which makes prints that areindestinguishable from the i960.

Prints I make at home go one place, and that's in sleevss and in a book, a place where print life will be longer. Prints I frame and put on a wall are always bigger than A4 (8.5x11), so those are always done by my web service (Smugmug). I think many stories from users regarding early fading prints involve many perameters we never know about, like using inferior third-party inks and inferior mounting materials.

In the end you need to not overthink "print life". My parents have 35mmslides and prints from the 1970's today that have faded or suffered color shifts. Print life isn't only relegated to digital photography. There's plenty of traditional prints that haven't and won't last in the long run. Until we actually have 10, 20 or 30 year oldinkject prints we have no difinitive answer as to how long our prints today will last.
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Old Jan 2, 2007, 10:54 AM   #3
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I burn to CD all my pictures so I may reprint them in the future. I also keep a set of CD's off site and thus provide 100 % security.
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 7:46 PM   #4
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stnkline wrote:
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I burn to CD all my pictures so I may reprint them in the future. I also keep a set of CD's off site and thus provide 100 % security.
Back in the 70's I tape recorded all the kids so I could listen to their voices in my old age. I carefully stored the recording in a safety deposit box in a bank vault.

Now I want to listen to them. Anybody got an 8-track tape player kicking around?
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 8:59 PM   #5
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Wilhelm Research does all their testing with florescent lights. This is appropriate for archivists that store documents under florescent lights (If you ever go to the National Archives, you'll find the Constitution and the Declaration of Independance in a dimly lit room with only florescent lights), but most of the light in my house is reflected sunlight. The predictions that Wilhelm Research makes are of little value to me.

In http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=57, I documented a test I did of various photo papers, and found that Canon photo paper fades pretty badly.

But that was with my setup.

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Old Feb 3, 2007, 11:33 AM   #6
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d.verhey wrote:
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Back in the 70's I tape recorded all the kids so I could listen to their voices in my old age. I carefully stored the recording in a safety deposit box in a bank vault.

Now I want to listen to them. Anybody got an 8-track tape player kicking around?
Actually yes!. I don't know if it works 'cause I don't have any tapes to test in it. If you want to pay the postage I'll be glad to ship it to you. It's a small desktop console type with a player and two speakers in the cabinet. I can post a pic and some more info if you're serious.
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Old Feb 9, 2007, 1:49 PM   #7
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Wolverine@MSU wrote:
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Actually yes!. I don't know if it works 'cause I don't have any tapes to test in it. If you want to pay the postage I'll be glad to ship it to you. It's a small desktop console type with a player and two speakers in the cabinet. I can post a pic and some more info if you're serious.
Thanks for the offer. I wasn't really looking for an 8-track player ( I did get one at a garage sale one day) but just trying to make a point about the flux of technology. Its great to say recording media will last 50 or 100 years but that won't do us much good if we can't access the media. The nice thing about hard-copy photographs is that they don't need any special technology to view later and I think that's why some people are concerned about how long an inkjet print will last compared to a photograph.
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