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Old May 8, 2012, 4:55 PM   #1
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Default Sunset (No post-processing)

When is "Shop" to much?

After a recent friend commented on one of my photos saying that "I wonder what it looked like before you Photoshopped it." It got under my skin a little bit and made me think "Do I really Photoshop to much of my images." After a lot of thinking and reviewing my portfolio, I realized NO I don't. Photoshop is just the digital equivalent of the film darkroom. A lot of the editing that many photographers do in photoshop can be done with film in the darkroom. Maybe the one thing that we take for granted is the ability to Clone stamp or the Patch tool, which is not able to be replicated in the darkroom. But exposure, levels, dodge, burn, saturation, can all be duplicated in the darkroom, and these are accepted practices. So what makes Photoshop different?
I try to remain true to the environment I was in and duplicate what I saw. Except for the HDR's my landscapes are usually straight out of camera, with minimal editing. The trick to photography is nailing the exposure in camera. You cannot always rely on Photoshop to fix major mistakes, the more effort you put into capturing the photo two things will happen; you will spend less time editing on the computer, and the photos will just look better.

So I headed out the other week with one purpose, take a photo and then apply NO post-processing to it. So here is it, a straight out of camera photo, loaded into Adobe Photoshop CS6, converted from RAW to JPEG with no movement of the RAW sliders and applied watermark.

Please feel free to comment, and show your own "No post-processing" photos.

-Travis-
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Old May 8, 2012, 6:56 PM   #2
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The camera has built in processing, Photoshop gives you the option of doing it a little differently. It's whatever pleases you.
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Old May 9, 2012, 4:25 PM   #3
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G'day Travis

-good post .. good topic
I am one who "enjoys the art of photography" more than "enjoys the digital darkroom now available to photographers" ... the 'but' is that there are still occasions when because lighting or local conditions were not 110% to my liking, I will do a tweak or two to an image. To parallel this, it's like my mother saying to me as a kid - "it's no use getting dressed up if you don't brush your hair"

I shoot exclusively in jpg format - 98% of my images stay as ex-camera and viewers never know the difference, nor do they comment. However I do find that the tweaks available to me from time-to-time are all I need to 'fix' something that may be a bit light or a bit dark [ie- levels & curves mainly]


Regards, Phil
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Old May 12, 2012, 5:00 PM   #4
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Lovely photo. The colours are some of my favorites. I try not to touch up a photo. If I need to touch up I feel I haven't taken a good photo. A couple of untouched offerings. The first landscape, the second was taken outside!
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Old May 13, 2012, 5:32 PM   #5
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G'day Travis

You are inviting us to join you with 'out-of-the-camera' [sunset] images

Here's one for you to consider

Dalby, central Queensland. Fuji X-s1 camera, exif= 600mm @ 1/80 x f5,6; iso-800 [hand-held]

Your comments are awaited ...
Regards, Phil
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Old May 14, 2012, 9:38 AM   #6
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Nice topic and sure to become a great discussion. I agree with the OP's point of view, that photoshop is a tool just like a darkroom is. I shoot 99% RAW images, and have my camera set to shoot a bit "flat". I then take my image into CS5 and make minor tweaks to adjust to what I felt when I took the picture. I firmly believe in getting it right when you take the shot. That being said, things don't always work out as planned. A lot of times the lighting exceeds the range of the sensor and HDR is not an option, Then more than minor tweaking may be needed. Nothing wrong with post processing, and nothing wrong if you chose not to. I guess for me is if you can't tell it was photoshopped, I've done my job. Just my 2 cents.
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Old May 16, 2012, 5:37 PM   #7
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Mito,
Very nice capture of the pink flowers and the bee, I like the deep blue of the sky, the contrast of the pink and blue works really well.

Ozzie,
The mist coming up from the ground I think is what makes this photo. Wonderful capture!

-Travis-
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Old May 17, 2012, 9:42 AM   #8
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Travis- your posted image of the sunset- nice though it is- I'm sure doesn't duplicate what you actually could see whilst there- such as the trees etc on the hill opposite.
And that's where the beauty of bracketing/HDR/Photoshop etc comes in....
It's all good in my book....
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Old May 17, 2012, 8:27 PM   #9
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Simon,

Well that is where the difference between traditional photography and HDR does come into play. Now if I had used a graduated neutral density filter, is may have been possible to create the HDR effect without need of software (however I do not own these filters...it's on my wishlist). The human eye is capable of extraordinary dynamic range which cameras just cannot capture. Even with HDR software, there is still guesswork that the software has to do, and is still not capable of displaying the scene just as it looked. It does come very close in some cases, but there are almost always tell signs in the photo that it is processed with software.

So looking back over the course of 80+ years photographers almost always had to expose for the highlights or the shadows. That is what we are used to seeing a brilliant sunset/sunrise with a silhouette middle ground, or a nicely exposed photo with blowout skies.

But it's all good in my book too, it will be a wonderful day indeed when the first camera is released capable of capturing the range a human eye can. I hope it occurs in my lifetime.
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Old May 18, 2012, 11:21 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozzie_Traveller View Post
G'day Travis

-good post .. good topic
I am one who "enjoys the art of photography" more than "enjoys the digital darkroom now available to photographers" ... the 'but' is that there are still occasions when because lighting or local conditions were not 110% to my liking, I will do a tweak or two to an image. To parallel this, it's like my mother saying to me as a kid - "it's no use getting dressed up if you don't brush your hair"

I shoot exclusively in jpg format - 98% of my images stay as ex-camera and viewers never know the difference, nor do they comment. However I do find that the tweaks available to me from time-to-time are all I need to 'fix' something that may be a bit light or a bit dark [ie- levels & curves mainly]


Regards, Phil
I'm with you on this matter. jpegs-R-us. My A77 and the lens I use produce pics that I am very pleased with 99% of the time.
I fiddle occasionally just to see what some of stuff does in PP.
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