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Old Mar 6, 2005, 8:31 AM   #11
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Love these Squonk - especially "Old John". I love any type of old brickwork, walls, buildings - whatever- find it fascinating with the built in texture and colours. These pics are great, sharp with color nicely catured.

The gnarled oak is nice, but does need some thought as to compostion. I come across some amazing trees also, but I can't seem to get them to come across as a photo.They look like "just a tree" as opposed to the wonderful image they present in reality. I am intertested to see what you do with them when you concentrate on trees - maybe I can pick up some inspiration from your shots!
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Old Mar 6, 2005, 10:20 AM   #12
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Thanks Suze (love the new avatar btw). Yes, some of the trees here really deserve some proper attention. This was one that I just "snapped in passing", there are some other lovely tortured looking old oaks around the park. I think the biggest problem I have in trying to photograph them is separating them from the other trees - but then I think that I need to concentrate on some close ups rather than just going for "the whole tree". Certainly some more imaginative angles would pay back, but I really was too chicken to go lying down this morning - the ground was icy and wet and I didn't feel quite keen enough for that at the time :-)

I'm with you on the stones and bricks front, I love the textures and the colours. Big old rocks are "my thing" but we've not really had much chance to go chasing them since our daughter arrived (see http://www.henge.org.uk ). Certainly looking forward to getting back out to them again with the 20D. The vast majority of the photos on my web site were taken on film and then scanned and to be honest I'm not too thrilled with many of the results.

Yes, I'll have a Tree Day out there some time soon. I think I just need to get out and practice with them. Anyone got any handy links for tree photography? Ah, I'll go do a Google, bound to find something out there somewhere :-)

The problem with this place is that I find so much that's attractive here that I seem to rush through where I would be better slowing down and taking my time.

Meanwhile, here's a nice bit of early Tudor brick work to be going along with. Bradgate House was one of the earliest English country houses, built just as the fashion moved away from castles. I was attracted by the rhombus patterns (a repeating theme in this building). Now that I've got home and I'm looking at it on the PC then I'm kicking myself for not centring the shot on the corner of the wall and showing more of the return. It is also crying out for some side lighting to pick up the depth of the texture. Unfortunatley it was a case of having to grab what I could so that I could be home to take care of the little one. Yoda voice: Much to learn I have.

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Old Mar 6, 2005, 10:26 AM   #13
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Humm... I promise I won't post any more pictures of old buildings in here. I'm going to get into trouble with the mods. My excuse is that the architecture is part of the landscape... erm... I'll shut up now :?
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Old Mar 6, 2005, 4:00 PM   #14
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Hmm, I think buildings are fine in the landscape forum. Architecture photography is about something else IMO.

Anyway, of today's photos the one that really stands out is the 2nd (the first of Old John) - the composition is nice - and the light is brilliant! Very nice shot!!

The first is nice - I like the path leading up to the tower.

The rest are "ordinary" subjects which I think need some special light to make them interesting. With the right light I think the tree picture could be very nice, but at the moment it's just a tree.

I think that's the frustrating thing about landscape photography more than other types. We can compose the shot nicely, but for a special shot we need nature to lend a hand with the light. A scene that's dull one moment can be amazing the next.

What I think is my best ever landscape shot - just there for a split second:

http://photos1.blogger.com/img/219/3...ramed_1024.jpg

Also a few shots of some trees if you fancy a look:

http://vanderwooks.blogspot.com/

I've had my 20D since November last year - it's completely revitalised my interest in photography. What fun we're having. :-)
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Old Mar 6, 2005, 4:11 PM   #15
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Yes, I think I would agree with that. I also think that I might be over-keen on posting images to the forums that don't really justify being posted. I think I'm still in the phase of being dazzled by what this camera can do.

I think that on my next trip I should be less shutter happy and take the time to sit and wait for the right light. I think this is an understandable symptom of having limited time to go shoot in this case. I had a couple of hours and I had my target locations. I would have been better concentrating those couple of hours on fewer targets.

Thank you all for the comments. I will be going back to see if I can do anything interesting with these interesting trees - but I promise - I won't be posting any more "it's a tree" shots :-)

Ooh - you just edited and added those links while I was replying Peripatetic. Thank you! :-) I'll be off to have a good look.

While I was making my buying decision I was looking at some of your shots taken with the 20D and you certainly helped to persuade me that I was making the right choice. I'll be very interested to see some more of your work, that shot of Lauren sat infront of the mirror is a stunner which I remember showing to my wife in that kind of "look what I'll be able to do" justification phase :-)

Yes, I can see what you mean regarding the temple photo. I can see from the clouds what kind of day it must have been, but then, *wham*, ray of sunshine in just the right place. Lovely!
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Old Mar 10, 2005, 2:35 AM   #16
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Squonk wrote:
Quote:
Yes, I think I would agree with that. I also think that I might be over-keen on posting images to the forums that don't really justify being posted. I think I'm still in the phase of being dazzled by what this camera can do.

I think that on my next trip I should be less shutter happy and take the time to sit and wait for the right light. I think this is an understandable symptom of having limited time to go shoot in this case. I had a couple of hours and I had my target locations. I would have been better concentrating those couple of hours on fewer targets.

Thank you all for the comments. I will be going back to see if I can do anything interesting with these interesting trees - but I promise - I won't be posting any more "it's a tree" shots :-)

Ooh - you just edited and added those links while I was replying Peripatetic. Thank you! :-) I'll be off to have a good look.

While I was making my buying decision I was looking at some of your shots taken with the 20D and you certainly helped to persuade me that I was making the right choice. I'll be very interested to see some more of your work, that shot of Lauren sat infront of the mirror is a stunner which I remember showing to my wife in that kind of "look what I'll be able to do" justification phase :-)

Yes, I can see what you mean regarding the temple photo. I can see from the clouds what kind of day it must have been, but then, *wham*, ray of sunshine in just the right place. Lovely!
Our problem is that we're not professional photographers, so we have to make do with what time we get. Often I'm out and about with my family and although they're very supportive they only have limited patience with waiting for a photograph. So we don't get days on end to find the perfect shot, we have to snatch what we can. But I do also find that looking back at a set of photographs if you're willing to spend a couple of hours in the "darkroom" i.e. photoshop you can sometimes pull up interesting photographs from some that looked ordinary.

An article which I found to be a revelation was this one:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/te.../process.shtml

When you take a shot there was something there that caught your eye and made you press the shutter. Can you find that crop? If you can then you're on your way.

P.S. Thanks for the kind comments.

Regards,
Craig
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