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Old May 16, 2005, 1:00 PM   #1
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Did my first bit of fly fishing ever [nope, never caught anything], and the lake that we visited was mirror-like most of the day. I took MANY picsat all sorts of angles, andsomehow the pics taken of the whole lake with distant mountains and trees and thingsjust didn't seem to work, the detail seemed lost, so anyway, here is a shot of the closest bank which I think came outOK.
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Old May 16, 2005, 2:04 PM   #2
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That really is, in my opinion, a wonderful photograph. And your comments about how you took the picture substantiate my criticism to my wife about my own scenic photography. I have too many pictures that I have taken where I have not devoted any time to the foreground of the image. I am slowly learning that landscape or scenic photography needs interesting things in the foreground to help create interest and show fine detail. In my opinion, the sharpness in the foreground of your image goes a long way toward making you feel there is more detail in the distance then there really is. That isn't any kind of a criticism of your picture or your camera. It's just that things that are closer to the camera can be shown in much greater detail. I think you did an excellent job.
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Old May 16, 2005, 2:27 PM   #3
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Thanks for the comments, jphess. I must admit to being very frustrated at the moment, we have just spent 10 days at an extremely beautiful part of the country, mountains, sandstone cliffs, fall [autumn] colours, rivers, grasses......., which all sounds like a photographersdream, and perhaps is, however, I must admit to not knowing how to HANDLE these majestic scenes. Even taking Panoramic type pics and stitching them seem tonot be able to give the detail that is really there.The pics I took [about 25GB worth] somehow don't do justice to what was visible with the eye, and only towards the end of our stay I started to realise that I shouldn't try and "fit it all in", but rather to, as you have correctlysaid, to find an object that is of interest in the foreground, and include the "scene" behind, and maybe even something else in the intermediate background as well. I should imagine the Rocky Mountains and the Grand Canyon type country would pose the same sort of "challenge"Thanks again for the input. I've included a pic I took as we left the area on Sunday with aninsignificant "rocky" ledge in the foreground, and it does seem to add a different perspective to the whole.





Regards
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Old May 16, 2005, 2:40 PM   #4
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Oh! I really like your images. Were these taken somewhere in the southwestern U.S.? The territory looks familiar to me. I can sense your frustration of visiting such a beautiful spot. I am leaving on my (probably) one and only trip to Alaska in a couple of weeks, and my fear is that I will come home with a whole bunch of disappointing images.
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Old May 16, 2005, 3:12 PM   #5
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Quote:
Were these taken somewhere in the southwestern U.S.?

These were taken in the Eastern Free State, South Africa, a little far from the USA. Looking forward to seeing some GREAT images from your trip to Alaska. Astowhat you have mentionedabout focusing onan interesting foreground object, I suppose one can say, that realising what one should do is then more than half way to accomplishing it.

Regards from the other side of the planet [I have attached one more, taken the same day. The wind was howling that day, so the trees and grass are not as sharp as they should look.]
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Old May 16, 2005, 4:28 PM   #6
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Hi Jake! Awe Inspiring!! I can't come up with the words to do these fantastic photos justice! Please post more!


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Old May 17, 2005, 1:27 PM   #7
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Thanks Bob, coming from the "sunman" himself, I'm humbled by your comments

I've been away from my home and business for close to three weeks, it's quite a challenge to focus on business and not on processing all the shots taken in the time away, however I'll have to make up some extra hours somewhere and get some pics in.



Thanks for looking in and taking the time to comment.
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Old May 17, 2005, 2:23 PM   #8
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Three excellent pictures Jake.

All are extremely evocative and I'm looking forward to getting back to SA to take some pics now.

My favourite is the middle one. The sky is dramatic, the textures and patterns in the foreground add interest without being overwhelming, and I think the exposure is really excellent; to have been able to get good detail in the shady areas of the mountains and not blow out the highlights on the hills. Really wonderful work.

I take your point about how challenging it must be though. It really makes one appreciate Ansel Adams and the like.

If you have some webspace somewhere I'd love to see a high-res version.

Regards,
Craig
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Old May 17, 2005, 4:17 PM   #9
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Hi Craig - Thanks for commenting, always welcome because you have a good critical eye- Unfortunately I don't have any webspace, I could perhaps email you a 3meg or soversion if you wish. Never heard of Ansel Adams, I'll have to look him up. Incidently, these pics were taken at Golden Gates, we spent a weekend at a Clarens B&B, and during our stay, we visited an art gallery or two- [there are19 galleries in this "blink you miss" small Free State dorp] -International quality stuff, some pieces selling for R35 grand or more, and a particular picture [B&W photograph] really grabbed me, the photographer being a Glen Green [according to the label]. Later that evening, I was chatting to the host of the B&B, she mentioned that her son does photography, I put a few things together [IE: her name is Barbara Green] and discovered her son is this photographer. You can see his stuff here. He apparantly never does any colour work and spends most of his time travelling Africa

www.glengreen.co.za

I'm surprised the last two pics are in even focus, the wind was blowing so hard that I could hardly stand, but I suppose that's the beauty of the IS on the 17-85



Regards from a cooling off SA [ 2 degrees C in the morning, afternoons still about 25]


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Old May 17, 2005, 4:38 PM   #10
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Hi Jake!

Here is a free site to post some of your photos if you might be interested.
http://bobhammitt.myphotoalbum.com/

Bob H.
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