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Old Aug 2, 2005, 7:22 AM   #1
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I took this photo using a Sigma 70-300mm on a 350D. Manual mode. I don't remember the other details. But this was like point and shoot. Your comments will be appreciated.
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 8:18 AM   #2
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Nice layout, but it looks a little washed out. At first I thought it was mist, but it just needs a little tweaking.

Question: (about the location) Is this a flood plain, or do you naturally get trees growing right at the water's edge like that?

Regards,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 9:46 AM   #3
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Thanks Tom,

To answer your question, this is a dam in South Africa build around 1900, it is a beautiful place, lots of environmental conservation. The trees grow naturally around the water edge. Panoramic picture is attached.

I had just bought my camera and decided to shot. I was not in possession of photographic techniques I subsequently learnt. That fact about being washed out, what causes it?

This phenomenon is exceedingly annoying in the picture attached What is this whitish haze? How do I get rid of it?

Kind regards.
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 9:53 AM   #4
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Tom,

Thanks! I am grateful you pointed out the washout. I notice it as a fact in some of my photos, what is this phenomena? What causes it? Will appreciate your advice. I have attached a photo where it is extreme.

The location of the previous photo is South Africa, a huge dam built about 1900. I don't remember the details, but it is a marvelous human wonder. Yes, the trees grow naturally around the water edge, or rather are planted. Mostly Eucalyptus.

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Old Aug 2, 2005, 10:02 AM   #5
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Aumma45 wrote:
Quote:
Thanks Tom,
Quote:
I had just bought my camera and decided to shot. I was not in possession of photographic techniques I subsequently learnt. That fact about being washed out, what causes it?

This phenomenon is exceedingly annoying in the picture attached What is this whitish haze? How do I get rid of it?

Kind regards.
The whitish look in this shot has to do with your metering/exposure. The histogram isshifted slightly to the right, meaning there are morebright pixels than dark ones. I believe this is called a high-key shot.

This is easily fixed in this shot. In Photoshop, simply create an adjustment layer for LEVELS. From here you can try the Auto setting, or adjust the Black point, White point and Greys using the eyedropper tool, or adjust the sliders, either for the global RGB channel or for the reds, greens and blued individually.

For this shot, I dragged the left slider for each of Red, Green, and Blue up to the first pixels showing in the histogram. For added contrast, I opened a Brightness/Contrast adjustment layer and lowered the brightness by 10 and raised the contrast by 10. To finish things off, I ran a light unsharp mask to clean it up a little.

Here is my result, I'm sure the more experienced Photoshoppers here could do much better. The details and colours are all there, it just takes some tweaking to bring them to life.

Regards,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
http://tomoverton.myphotoalbum.com
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 10:14 AM   #6
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OK, you had to doctor this on the computer using photoshop, I must say it isgreat. Thanks for the little lesson. But is it possible to correct this phenomenon on the camera itself, so that the results are similar to what you produced using photoshop.

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Old Aug 2, 2005, 10:27 AM   #7
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I took the picture attached on the same day I took the above photos. Canon 350D, Sigma 70-300mm lens. Don't remember the other details. What could I have done better?

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Old Aug 2, 2005, 10:46 AM   #8
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I'm not familiar with your camera or its exposure settings. I'm pretty sure it has a histogram display. Depending on the kind of shot you are taking, you should see pixels spread across the entire spectrum, hopefully with no huge spikes at either end. I see from your EXIF data that you are shooting in Manual exposure mode. You may want to spend some time in Auto, while you play around with other related details like aperture and shutter speed. That's the best advice I can give for now as I really don't know your camera's capabilities.

Cheers,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
http://tomoverton.myphotoalbum.com
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 11:23 PM   #9
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one thing that will help - well, two things actually -are a polarizing filter and a lens hood. the filter will help bring out the contrast between sky and clouds and earth, and will help improve color saturation. the hood will prevent excess light from getting into the lens (which is an issue with telephoto lenses), and will increase contrast and help avoid that "washed-out" look.
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 11:53 PM   #10
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The truth is that these were my first pictures with the 350D. This was the first time I have been able to display them on the forum. Learning from my weak and strong points in retrospect. As for the camera, there is still plenty to learn, but I feeling much more comfortable now.

I have a question about the histogram, when is the reading balance? Is it whenit is skewed to the left, to the right or when it is evenly distributed across the x-axis?
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