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Old Aug 15, 2006, 7:08 PM   #1
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Here are more pics from my trip down to The Getty Museum a few weeks ago. The panos were posted here.

























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Old Aug 16, 2006, 10:48 AM   #2
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Oh, that's where I'd like tobe tomorrow (if not closed on thursdays ! Very neat, beautiful architecture with vast interior spaces, indeed. Looks like an Eldorado for any art lover... Wikipedia writes:''The museum collects and exhibits classical sculpture and art, European paintings, drawings, manuscripts, sculpture, decorative arts, and photographs. In respect to Getty's collecting intentions, the museum does not generally collect 20th or 21st century art, with the exception of photography''Did youalso take any indoor shotsfeaturingthese works?
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Old Aug 16, 2006, 12:04 PM   #3
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I'm glad you like them, bahadir. From what I've read, the museum has been criticized for using an architecture design that outshines the works inside. The collection was great, but it was hard to shoot inside because it was too crowded, too dark and they didn't allow flash or tripod use inside. Light can affects paintings' aging, so even outside light is controlled and shutters on the ceiling would close when it gets too bright outside. Here are a few that turned out decent:













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Old Aug 16, 2006, 12:35 PM   #4
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Mmmm nice pieces! I almost alwaysprefer the available light however scarce it might be, and therefore wouldn't use the flash even they allowed to do so! I think your DSLR is capable to deliver neat images even at high ISO levels allowing you handheld shots.In addition to the difficulties you mentioned, the reflections on the glassprotecting the works,isalso a nuisance whichmake me think that museum adminstrationtakes an actual pleasure from! Do you think a polarizing filter can prevent this?Have you ever tried one?
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Old Aug 16, 2006, 1:08 PM   #5
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Quote:
Mmmm nice pieces! I almost always prefer the available light however scarce it might be, and therefore wouldn't use the flash even they allowed to do so! I think your DSLR is capable to deliver neat images even at high ISO levels allowing you handheld shots. In addition to the difficulties you mentioned, the reflections on the glass protecting the works, is also a nuisance which make me think that museum adminstration takes an actual pleasure from! Do you think a polarizing filter can prevent this? Have you ever tried one?
I forgot to mention that. Somehow, I forgot to check my ISO and it was set to 200 instead of Auto, that's the main reason most of my indoor shots were non-keepers. It's user error, not the camera's fault. I'm sure if I had boosted the ISO I could have captured everything just fine.

A CP definitely could have fixed the glare on the glass, but I didn't try it as it would have cut down on light, by two stops I think. It would still be possible to shoot that particular statue, since it was next to the window, but like I said I messed up on the ISO setting.


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Old Aug 16, 2006, 4:43 PM   #6
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rey wrote:
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I forgot to mention that. Somehow, I forgot to check my ISO and it was set to 200 instead of Auto, that's the main reason most of my indoor shots were non-keepers. It's user error, not the camera's fault. I'm sure if I had boosted the ISO I could have captured everything just fine.
Oh, I see.Indeed,with an ISO of 200 in a museum, depending on the lens and the amount of available light,one could shoot at an exposure time of 1/30 ora little bit more, whichrequires a very very steady hand like that of a sniper!


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Old Aug 16, 2006, 5:07 PM   #7
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Great photos. What an amazing piece of architecture! It looks like there are limitless photo opportunities here.
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Old Aug 17, 2006, 5:23 PM   #8
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Great photos. What an amazing piece of architecture! It looks like there are limitless photo opportunities here.
Thanks Ladyhawk. When I took the tour, they actually pointed out how the architect designed it with "picture framing" in mind. Anywhere you look, there is something to shoot, and the view is framed for you.




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Old Aug 18, 2006, 8:23 AM   #9
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Great pictures, beautiful architecture.

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