Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Landscape Photos

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 6, 2006, 11:39 AM   #11
Member
 
Huckleberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 63
Default


Click on this linkto hear a1990s radio interview with famed whistler Muzzy Marcellino:
http://www.whistlingrecords.com/muzzy_marcellino/muzzy_marcellino.htm


Last edited by Huckleberry; Mar 2, 2011 at 10:20 AM. Reason: to re-do the color of my scripted text
Huckleberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 6, 2006, 11:43 AM   #12
Member
 
Huckleberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 63
Default

I worked as a waiter at the Henryville House in the summers of 1964 and 1966. I didn't work there in 1965 simply because I got a better paying job that summer. At Henryville, a waiter was lucky if he cleared $60 a week (this sum including minimum wage pay from Henryville House PLUS guest tips). Tips at Henryville were not good. It wasn't as though we were all a bunch of lousy waiters being tipped the bare minimum by guests expressing dissatisfaction with poor service. Each vacationing family at Henryville would typically be served for a full week's worth of meals (three meals a day times seven days, or 21 meals altogether).

Henryville chambermaids used to put small pre-printed envelopes in guest rooms near the end of each week, these envelopes to be used by guests for their tips to waiters and chambermaids. Each waiter usually had five or six tables in his station each week (number of tables depending on size of the families). At the end of each week (Saturday lunch or dinner), each of my guest families would press upon me this small sealed envelope with "To Huckleberry" carefully written on it, "who has helped make our week here more memorable... with heartfelt thanks". Mothers frequently gave me big warm hugs, fathers a warm handshake, then tearful goodbyes before exiting the dining hall, me of course not opening these envelopes until I was alone. Usually I found five dollars inside, occasionally a ten dollar bill, almost never a tip greater than that. $5.00 multiplied times six tables = $30. Wages at Henryville were about $30 a week. The minimum wage back in those years was either $1.15 or $1.25, $30 a week minimum wage didn't begin to cover all the hours we put in setting up, waiting on and busing tables (we bused our own tables),all this done three times a day, seven days a week. Never a day off, all summer long.

Henryville vacationers in those years were often people of more modest means than those vacationing atSkytop Lodge, Buck Hill Inn and Pocono Manor. During those years, I think the owners of Henryville Lodge made a conscious decision tomarket the lodge to a lower budget segment of the vacationing market. I don't say this with any contempt for Henryville vacationers. Quite the opposite. Most of those vacationing at Henryville Lodge were genuinely warm,sincere individuals. Frankly, I don't think I would have enjoyed waiting on the wealthier clientele at places like Skytop Lodge. At Henryville, we were free to socialize with vacationing guests after (and in between) mealime work hours, to swim at the pool together or join in on various activities at "The Old Slab Hut". Henryville staff workers were not shunted aside in the off-work hours, not instructed to "disappear" when we weren't serving guests in the dining hall. If vacationing families wanted us to join them at poolside or on the shuffleboard courts, we were encouraged by the owners of Henryville Lodge (Alvin & Eleanor Ziegler) to join in. This made the whole summer experience that much more rewarding for all of us - vacationers and staff alike.

Last edited by Huckleberry; Mar 2, 2011 at 10:21 AM. Reason: to re-do the color of my scripted text
Huckleberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 6, 2006, 11:46 AM   #13
Member
 
Huckleberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 63
Default


Here is the National Registry of Historic Places link to view the 19-page PDF document re Henryville House: http://www.arch.state.pa.us/pdfs/H086645_01B.pdf


[align=right][/align]


Last edited by Huckleberry; Mar 2, 2011 at 10:21 AM. Reason: to re-do the color of my scripted text
Huckleberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 6, 2006, 11:48 AM   #14
Member
 
Huckleberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 63
Default

Inside the old slab Hut building of Henryville Lodge & Cabanas in the 1950s & 1960s, vacationing guests could enjoy various leisurely activities like "horse racing" (plywood cut-out horses moving forward one, two or more spaces depending on the roll of the dice). As rinky-dink as this sounds, it was very popular (any lodge activity which succeeded in bringing vacationing guests together simply to chat and visit with one another had a very good chance of becoming popular). It was a lot of fun, much more than you may think!

Last edited by Huckleberry; Mar 2, 2011 at 10:21 AM. Reason: to re-do the color of my scripted text
Huckleberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 6, 2006, 11:50 AM   #15
Member
 
Huckleberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 63
Default

If you look closely at photos of Henryville House, photostaken in the years leading up to its demolition (plywood sheets covering what were oncethe lovely floor to ceiling windows of the large and always boisterous dining hall), you could also see what remained of several long concrete slab shuffleboard courts in front of the dining hall windows (shuffleboard courts parallel to the rectangular slab stone walkway).When new guest families arrived on Sundays for a week ofvacationing fun at Henryville Lodge, we waiters had a fine vantage point from which to check out the new week's teenage girls playing shuffleboardbelow, our vantage point being the great view afforded by the dining hall's windows. We were supposed to be busily setting up our tables for lunch or dinner but instead used this time to look at the girls playing shuffleboard, the girls fully aware they were being watched (such momentsoften being the first visual contact of what would occasionally become another week ofsummer romance).

Last edited by Huckleberry; Mar 2, 2011 at 10:22 AM. Reason: to re-do the color of my scripted text
Huckleberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 11, 2006, 5:57 PM   #16
Member
 
Huckleberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 63
Default

Click on following links to see former Henryville, Pennsylvania train station, etc.

black & white photo of the old DL&W train station at Henryville (photo dated May 18, 1908):
http://freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~tubbs/ErieLackawanna/henryvil.gif


old postcard picture of the railroad ("Coming Through the Cut, Near Henryville, PA"):
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/pa/monroe/postcards/hencut.jpg


concrete steps (all that remains from the site of former Henryville train station):
http://el-list.railfan.net/archives/henry1.jpg


piece of the railroad track (with "Henryville" marked on it):
http://el-list.railfan.net/archives/henry3.jpg


photos of Henryville House demolition (including The Pocono Record news article re same):
http://www.buckhillinn.us/hhousenew.htm
Attached Images
 

Last edited by Huckleberry; Mar 2, 2011 at 10:22 AM. Reason: to re-do the color of my scripted text
Huckleberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2006, 12:36 AM   #17
Member
 
Huckleberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 63
Default



In many ways, the Henryville House of the 1960s took the term "rinky-dink" to new heights. Somewhat similar to the way the State of New Jersey is sometimes called "camp" (its campness being NJ's charm). In a similar way, that's how I felt about the Henryville House back in the 1960s - that its charm was somehow linked to its rinky-dinkness. My parents were always a little puzzled as to how I could feel attached to a place like Henryville. They would look at the place and see only rinky-dink, no charm. They never took time (perhaps a 20 minute visit when they drove me to the Poconos to drop me off for a summer of work). They thought I was a perhaps a little "tetched" in the head to describe Henryville as charming.

Social activities for Henryville guests were rinky-dink. The word hokey would also apply. Horse racing (on Tuesday nights, I think) was nothing more than plywood cut-outs of horses (about a foot high) placed on the floor of "The Hut" building, a rough, log cabinish looking structure where many guest social activities took place. "Horses" were placed on a racetrack (five or six lanes marked on The Hut's wooden floor (racing lanes from one end of the large room to the other). Someone would roll dice and such and such a horse would move forward one or two spaces on the racetrack. When I first arrived at Henryville in June 1864, I heard there was horse racing. My initial thought was "Wow! That's great!" Then I find this rinky-dink activity. I should have taken a cue from Chico in the Marx Brothers' movie "A Day at the Races" and made some extra money selling racing forms to the guests.

As far as I could tell back then, the activity schedule for Thursday nights had not been altered one iota in at least ten years. The same Thursday night activity every week of every summer (twelve or thirteen weeks in each summer) for ten or more summers. It consisted of a short, black & white W.C. Fields film "The Bank Dick" and the very same Woody Woodpecker cartoon trailer, week after week after week. The guests (you really had to love em!) were always delighted to come back every summer to the same, same, and same activities. Once in awhile, I politely asked a vacationing family why they would choose to repeatedly come back to something which approached a "broken record". And they would immediately exclaim that the very sameness of Henryville was exactly what attracted them in the first place. After awhile, I too began to see what they meant.

Many Henryville guests - indeed, the majority of Henryville guests during those years - seemed to come from Brooklyn. And the Henryville House of the 1950s and 1960s thrived on the repeat business of those very loyal guests.

To see a black & white photograph of the Henryville House, click on this link:

http://www.arch.state.pa.us/images/hires/H086645_01B.jpg

http://www.arch.state.pa.us/images/hires/H086645_01B.jpg


Last edited by Huckleberry; Mar 2, 2011 at 10:23 AM. Reason: to re-do the color of my scripted text
Huckleberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2006, 12:38 AM   #18
Member
 
Huckleberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 63
Default


A shabby, run-down building on the Henryville grounds called 'Bedlam' served as all-male living quarters for waiter and kitchen staff. Henryville Lodge chambermaids were quartered in the large, old lodge building.

Upon entering Bedlam, the first thing that struck you was that it looked like a dank, cheap whorehouse. You entered a long hallway with no windows, lit only by two or three bare lightbulbs dangling from the ceiling, the only natural light in the hallway only possible if a boarder left his bedroom door open. There were eight or so rooms on each side of the hallway (don't remember the exact number). Doors to rooms were made of cheap material, some not even closing properly. Each room had two single beds. The one window in each room was what would be expected in a prison cell - high and horizontal. We almost had to stand on our beds to see out our windows. Sinks, showers and toilets were in the back, at the end of the hallway. That area reeked. You didn't want to get stuck with a room back there. There were a few more rooms upstairs. Second-story rooms were a little more appealing mostly because their dormer windows let in more natural light.

In the summer of 1964, we had a fire in Bedlam around 05:00 AM
(an awful hour for a fire since we were all asleep). Blood-curdling screams from one boarder, yelling "Fire!" awakened us. Flames (not just smoke) licked the walls right out the doorway of his room into the hall. He and his roommate got out fast - and so did the rest of us. Flames went right to the ceiling. Smoke started seeping into those second-story rooms. A few of us went up there to make sure those guys were awake and getting out.

To go to Bedlam's upstairs rooms, you had to exit Bedlam by the front or the back and go around to the hillside (hill into which Bedlam was built) to a doorway to the upstairs living quarters. Those rooms had only that one doorway from which to exit (short of jumping out of upstairs windows). Downstairs, we had two exits - one in front (down a bunch of rickety wooden stairs, leading from Bedlam's front porch to a driveway between Bedlam and the large lodge building). Our second downstairs exit was at the far end of the hallway - out the back doorway by the toilets.

When some of us went to roust those guys upstair, we found they were already awake - but were astounded to find them sitting on their beds playing cards! "What's the hurry?", they asked. We had to herd them out of the building. The smoke alone would have done them in. The flames wouldn't be far behind.

One thing which really scared us was that all the gasoline (for lawnmowers and other lodge maintenance equipment) was stored in large drums and tanks under the first floor quarters of Bedlam (storage area accessible from the driveway mentioned above, a driveway which also ran between Bedlam and the Annex building (Annex bldg and Bedlam ran parallel to each other). Just FYI, the Annex building is the only building (on the northwest side of Route 715) still standing. When I visited the grounds of Henryville House this past October, I saw that Patrick Capozzolo had also spared the two cabana buildings on the other side of Route 715.

Luckily for us, the stored gasoline never ignited.

Construction material used for walls of Bedlam was a lousy beaverboard-type material which was about as strong (more appropriate to use the word weak) as bulletin board material for thumbtack use. The construction industry word for this material is 'homosode'. Inhabitants (more like inmates?) of Bedlam often punched fists through this cheap material, making holes in the walls from one room to the next. Therefore, the inside of Bedlam looked like Swiss cheese.

More on the fire in a follow-up posting. For now, suffice it to say that the fire WAS put out and Bedlam was saved (unfortunately).

Attached Images
 

Last edited by Huckleberry; Mar 2, 2011 at 10:23 AM. Reason: to re-do the color of my scripted text
Huckleberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2006, 12:40 AM   #19
Member
 
Huckleberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 63
Default


In the summer of 1964, another Henryville waiter and Iput together a "hitchhiking" scarecrow which stood at least six feet tall. After dark, we placed our scarecrow on the side of Highway 191 and waited for passing cars.To construct our scarecrow, we found some discarded clothing, a battered hat and old rags in an unused upstairs room inBedlam. We also found a cinderblock and two pieces of 2x4 lumber.We padded a sport jacket and shirt wth rags to fill out the torso, doing the same to fill out legs in a pair of old trousers. We found a pillowcase which we stuffed with rags and squeezed down to the approximate size of a human head,pulling the brim of the hat down low over the scarecrow's brow to conceal its face.We drew facial features on the pillowcase with charcoal, also using the charcoal to darken the pillowcase.We took the shorter piece of 2x4 and attached it like a cross to the longervertical 2x4 to create shoulders,making the right arm stick out far enough to look like a man extending his arm to hitch a ride.We used the cinderblock to makeour scarecrow stand up straight, sticking the vertical 2x4 into one of the holes of the cinderblock. We then put some grass around the cinderblock in order to better conceal it.

Way back in the 1960s,traffic on Highway 191 was considerably less than today.We took Thumbstick
(the name we gave our scarecrow) to the edge of the highway, near where the Henryville Lodge lake used to be, doing so late at night,around 10:00 or 11:00 PM.This gave us plenty of time to set up our scarecrow before a car would come down that stretch ofroad.When we heard a car coming, we scrambled to hide in the grass between the road and the lake.I remember several cars passingby,not one car taking our bait.Finally, as it was getting very late - when we were about to call it a night, a car drove by andslowed down after passing Thumbstick, then stopping completely withmotor idling.We tried hard to suppress our laughter as the slurred voice of an obviously drunk driver yelled out to Thumbstick, "Are you coming or what?!" The priceless reaction of this one drivermade all our efforts worthwhile! For the rest of the summer, we enjoyed some goodlaughs recounting our roadside adventure with Thumbstick.

Last edited by Huckleberry; Mar 2, 2011 at 10:25 AM. Reason: to re-do the color of my scripted text
Huckleberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2006, 2:05 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Curmudgeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: East Bay, San Francisco, CA
Posts: 889
Default

This is very nice but there are no pictures that you have taken. They are more along the lines of archecture than landscape and may belong in that forum.

cheers.

Bill
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:27 PM.