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Old Feb 13, 2010, 2:30 AM   #1
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Default Mushroom in the garden

Some pictures taken with a Sony Alpha a550.
Mushrooms found in the garden and you can see the different sizes as time goes by.
Last picture is a HDR from the built in camera.











Tried a black and weight picture.


Last edited by Bruno28; Feb 16, 2010 at 3:13 AM.
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Old Feb 13, 2010, 9:50 PM   #2
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Sheesh! Nice shots!

And for the life of me I can't identify these mushrooms. And I hunt mushrooms!

The first shot looks like a member of the Lepiota Family, the second like an Innocybe.

Did you take a spoor print?

This is done by putting the mushroom on a piece of white paper, covering it with a cup, and then wait 24 hours - The color of the spoors will then be apparent and you can then combine all other aspects and determine the species.

Dave
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Old Feb 14, 2010, 2:39 AM   #3
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Sheesh! Nice shots!

And for the life of me I can't identify these mushrooms. And I hunt mushrooms!

The first shot looks like a member of the Lepiota Family, the second like an Innocybe.

Did you take a spoor print?

This is done by putting the mushroom on a piece of white paper, covering it with a cup, and then wait 24 hours - The color of the spoors will then be apparent and you can then combine all other aspects and determine the species.

Dave
Thanks Dave, I'm glad you liked it.

These mushrooms were in my garden, I have no idea what species they are. I didn't do a spoor print, i didn't touch it cause i don't know if its toxic or not.

Today they looked like they were dying, so i didn't take a picture. I'll see if I can take a new picture so you can find out the species.
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Old Feb 14, 2010, 2:41 PM   #4
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Thanks Dave, I'm glad you liked it.

These mushrooms were in my garden, I have no idea what species they are. I didn't do a spoor print, i didn't touch it cause i don't know if its toxic or not.

Today they looked like they were dying, so i didn't take a picture. I'll see if I can take a new picture so you can find out the species.
No North American mushroom is dangerous to touch. Just don't put it in your mouth...

Spoor prints are fun. The gills or pores lay down a pattern on the paper. It's the color of the print along with the other characteristics that tell us the species. For example, on this mushroom the warts are not directly attached (they fell off). Is the ring moveable or is it too attached? How do the gills attach to the stalk? Etc, etc...

(but they are still nice shots)

Dave
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Old Feb 15, 2010, 10:09 PM   #5
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Nice pictures. The HDR really makes a difference - I have that camera, but I haven't tried that feature yet.

Dave - so you are a mushroom maven? Have you any idea what this one is - I have no idea myself:

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/pe...oom-macro.html
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Old Feb 16, 2010, 4:17 PM   #6
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Nice pictures. The HDR really makes a difference - I have that camera, but I haven't tried that feature yet.

Dave - so you are a mushroom maven? Have you any idea what this one is - I have no idea myself:

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/pe...oom-macro.html
The first images look like a "Lepiota," some of which can make you very sick, and some of which are a real treat. But it didn't age like most Lepiotas, so I am confused. A spoor print would probably do the trick.

The real key to hunting wild mushrooms is to learn enough to identify the family from which it comes. There are thousands of mushrooms which belong to families that you CAN taste, and if it tastes good, then it's fine to eat. But then again, there are many families of mushrooms where a simple taste can result in the necessity of a kidney or liver transplant...

However, none of them can harm you merely by touching them.

Dave
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