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Old Jun 4, 2004, 12:14 PM   #1
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shooting the sun, is it that hard?

anyone know any good techniques i tried to get the sun in the upper left corner in a picture the other day but for some reason i got some bad rays and a good amout of purple fringing.
like in this pic

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Old Jun 4, 2004, 3:30 PM   #2
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I got something similar in my cloud picture (take a look in the "other" forum). Looks like yours might be caused by the different layers of glass in the lens. But that is just a guess.

I've often thought about taking a picture of the sun on its own. Is it hard to do? I know you can't look at it directly but how would film cope? Would one of those cheap plastic filters that come on the market each time a solar eclipse is due work well?

Sorry if I'm thread hijacking.
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Old Jun 6, 2004, 3:44 AM   #3
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The rays are caused by the leaves in the aperture of your lens...you have 14. In my shot there are only 8, meaning 8 leaves :?. I like the effect, starburst filters were very popular when I was a lad! . Use photoshop or similar to remove if you really want to!As for the purple fringing, I would say thet was down to the quality of your lens....what is it? What camera did you use? By the way if you want to photograph the sun, be careful, and use a good polarising filter on the lens. Also saturn will pass in front of the sun on Tuesday 8th June (Soon). So check it out!!!!!
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Old Jul 20, 2004, 12:21 PM   #4
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You might be able to reduce or eliminate the starburst effect by using a neutral density filter so that the lens doesn't have to be stopped down to minimum aperture. A ND2 will get you one stop and a ND4 will get two stops. I don't know if that is enough. If not, you can stack ND filters and the effect is additive.
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