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Old Feb 7, 2005, 5:03 PM   #11
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I use small table tripod and while holding the camera still with my arms still by my body, I use my chess for the table. Then just stop breathing while taking the picture.


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Old Feb 12, 2005, 11:51 PM   #12
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You are so lucky to get to go to Alaska! It is good you will have the IPOD along to save the image, but I worry that you may go the whole week taking shots that seem good and then when you get home and get them full size on the screen you will notice that they all have too much grain or a tiny bit of shake you couldn't see on the camera screen. It has happened to me. Perhaps there would be a computer at the place you are staying to run a slide show on of your images to see if you are getting what you think you are getting.

This may not fit the "how to take pictures" theme, but since it is your honeymoon, you two should seriously discuss how you are going to divide up your time so that your image of the ideal trip and hers don't clash from day one. Personally, I'd be want to be out there shooting, too, but try to find some balance so she feels like you care about something other than the perfect shot.

Read up about shooting against a white background so that if you are shooting dark animals against a light background, you know what to do.

Find out about good settings for shooting glaciers as you do your research.

Take lots of bug spray and keep your garbage sealed up to avoid bear problems.

If you find yourself in the most breathtaking spot in the world, take pictures with the standard setting, and then look to see what the settings are and change your aperture to be a little bigger and a little smaller and try the same shot. Some cameras let you do that automatically.

Read up on shooting northern lights. People have told me and I have read to try these settings: ISO 100, f16, shutter open for 6 seconds OR ISO 200, f/8, lens set to infinity OR ISO 400, f/4, 1/15 sec for shutter speed...these have all been recommended.

You may think this is lame, but when I started, I got index cards and put them on a key ring and put topics on each one with starting settings so I knew what to do. This has been so helpful, because I can't remember all the settings and with time, these will become second hand. You'll be able to look at a picture and guess all the settings by what you see. I have cards on: northern lights, fireworks, lightning, glowing night scenes, reflections, dark forests, snow, rain, moon, star trails, action in bright light, action in low light, flowing water, a cheat sheet on aperture and shutter speeds, etc. While I use these less and less, when I would find myself in that precious moment when this awesome scene was unfolding, I at least had the option of pulling out my pack of cheat sheets to have a decent chance at an OK shot.

Good luck, congrats on the wedding and trip, and can't wait to see your shots!!


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Old Feb 13, 2005, 2:41 PM   #13
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Good points fellow CheeseHead.

scotty72, spend enough time with your cameras between now and your honeymoon to become intimately familiar with your cameras. Spend your time in Alaska paying attention to your bride, not to your camera.
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Old Feb 14, 2005, 10:42 PM   #14
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BillDrew wrote:
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scotty72, spend enough time with your cameras between now and your honeymoon to become intimately familiar with your cameras. Spend your time in Alaska paying attention to your bride, not to your camera.
Ahh... true wisdom. Unless you're intent on suffering for your art. Bear in mind, though, that most artists suffer alone. :O

To Wisconsin Girl (boy you guys must have really smart air there or something) I don't keep cards, but I do have a list of shots I'd like to take, given the right conditions (time being one of the precious commodities) Every so often, I am able to check something off the list, or add something new.

Great ideas, folks.

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
http://www.darwinonline.org/index.php?cat=11078
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Old Feb 15, 2005, 9:25 PM   #15
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Too funny, Tom. :blah:

No, it is just an obsessive nature when it comes to things like photography, and a memory that is fading way too early for being this young. That is why I need the cards! :-)
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