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Old Mar 17, 2005, 6:43 AM   #1
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Hello there Fellow Photography Enthusiasts...

I am very new to digital photography.

I own a beginner level
Canon A400 camera.

recently i took photo's of the sun (directly)

after this, i find the pictures i take a little over-exposed, and dark (brightness is low). could this have to do with the Sun damaging the ccd/camera?

I wonder... thanks for your views in advance. i hope i get to understand.
Cheers,
Mark.
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Old Mar 17, 2005, 7:54 AM   #2
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I know that the manual of my camera said not to do it.
But I have done it a few times with no problems.

I don't know if your problem could have been caused by it or not.

Sorry, can't help much more than that.

Eric
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Old Mar 17, 2005, 10:29 AM   #3
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Thank you Eric.
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Old Mar 17, 2005, 11:46 AM   #4
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It doesn't hurt to take the sun directly if it on the horizon for sunrise and sunset. The large amount of atmosphere it has to travel through filters out most of the harmful rays. But you don't want to aim your camera directly at the sun when it is high and bright. You could have caused problems if you did that.
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Old Mar 17, 2005, 3:34 PM   #5
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Were the pictures ok before you took photos of the sun? That is, you had good exposure (brightness etc) originally. But now, every photo that you take (even in good lighting conditions) seems to have a problem?

It's 'possible' that the camera may have been damaged by the sun....but then again, it could have failed for some other reason not related to the sun. But you should do more tests with it over time. That is, take pictures in good lighting conditions on 'Automatic' setting. If the pictures are no good, then something's got to be wrong.

Anyhow, sometimes it's important to read the camera's instruction guide a bit before using the camera, because I think the instructions will usually recommend not to point the camera directly at the sun.
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Old Mar 17, 2005, 8:44 PM   #6
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It shouldn't hurt your camera. It might hurt it if you were standing right next to the sun, but down here on Earth, 93 million miles away, the sun isn't all that bright.


Brad
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Old Mar 17, 2005, 9:27 PM   #7
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I see ... so you mean that if his camera's characteristics changed after he had taken pictures of the sun, then it's absolutely certain that the camera wasn't damaged by the sunlight?
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Old Mar 17, 2005, 9:36 PM   #8
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From my FZ10 manual:
"• Do not direct the Viewfinder or lens to
the sun. Internal components may be
seriously damaged."

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Old Mar 18, 2005, 10:44 AM   #9
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CCD sensors can be affected in point and shoot cameras, when they are pointed toward the sun for a long time. this is because the CCD is exposed to it the whole time (this lets you use the LCD on the back of the camera for composistion), UNLIKE Digital SLR cameras, where the CMOS or CCD sensor is only exposed to the sun for the time the shutter is open, and if correctly done, it will never hurt the Digital SLR camera, because you are choosing a safe shutter speed to expose, just like you would any other picture (i.e Same amount of light photons hitting the sensor)

Hope this helps

-Travis-
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Old Mar 18, 2005, 2:54 PM   #10
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When you took the picture directly into the sun, thesun rays are digitizedin the cameraalong wi the rest of the incoming data and are written to the CCD, thus exposing themselves on your output as brighter, whiter areas, however, with theionizing effect of the sun's particle bursts, they will cause dark spots or 'sunspots' producing negative or as you say "dark' areas on the photo. Best to using an ioning filter with a sun burst coating...I think Wallmart has them on special this week in the camera section.

On the other hand you can try playing around using the sun's light from different angles to get various effects on the outcome of your image and avoid direct contact altogether...:G


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