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Old Mar 9, 2013, 9:55 PM   #1
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Default "Pro" shooting with M5

I have a client that that I have been doing their ads for a number of years. I'm thinking of pitching them on having the partners and associates photographed again -- previously done in 2010. The shooting involves both portraits and office environmentals, about three to five days on location. The requirements for the photos does not require going in with a full frame camera, nothing gets printed larger than 4x5 in magazines.
My dilemma in this would be showing up with an M5 and facing the client's expectations. They are used to seeing a thumping great canon full frame or some such with big lenses, and here I am with a diminutive oly with the micro lenses. Easily more than capable for the project -- heck my e-pl1 would be almost good enough (not fast enough focusing in the interiors). The client is paying a good amount for the shooting and then I show up with what appears as a lesser camera system. Is the OMD-M5 usable -- from the client's view -- for a professional assignment?
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Old Mar 10, 2013, 12:07 AM   #2
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I think it all depends on how you present yourself to the client. There are various examples of pros using micro four-thirds cameras, the latest example I read about being here..

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/51002493

As long as the user/camera are up to the task and you have the lenses and other equipment/lighting needed to get the job done, I don't see any reason why the E-M5 would not work. You just tell anyone concerned this is now what you use, and it will provide the results they want to see. If that's not enough, I don't know what else you can tell anyone more interested in what it is you are actually using. It'd be one thing if this was a sporting event, which is the one type of work where this equipment would be out of its' element.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; Mar 10, 2013 at 12:09 AM.
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Old Mar 10, 2013, 8:12 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by KulaCube View Post
I have a client that that I have been doing their ads for a number of years. I'm thinking of pitching them on having the partners and associates photographed again -- previously done in 2010. The shooting involves both portraits and office environmentals, about three to five days on location. The requirements for the photos does not require going in with a full frame camera, nothing gets printed larger than 4x5 in magazines.
My dilemma in this would be showing up with an M5 and facing the client's expectations. They are used to seeing a thumping great canon full frame or some such with big lenses, and here I am with a diminutive oly with the micro lenses. Easily more than capable for the project -- heck my e-pl1 would be almost good enough (not fast enough focusing in the interiors). The client is paying a good amount for the shooting and then I show up with what appears as a lesser camera system. Is the OMD-M5 usable -- from the client's view -- for a professional assignment?
if you grip up the OMD they may not notice
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Old Mar 10, 2013, 9:17 AM   #4
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It's all in the way you present yourself and the confidence you show during the set up and photo shoot that's important. They are buying your expertise and ability to deliver the results they need. They are not buying your camera.

If I were doing the shoot and someone engaged me in conversation regarding the camera I was using, I would simply tell them it's the latest in technology and it's small size allows me greater mobility.
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Old Mar 10, 2013, 12:11 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
It's all in the way you present yourself and the confidence you show during the set up and photo shoot that's important. They are buying your expertise and ability to deliver the results they need. They are not buying your camera.

If I were doing the shoot and someone engaged me in conversation regarding the camera I was using, I would simply tell them it's the latest in technology and it's small size allows me greater mobility.
Zig
I agree with Zig and all the other comments. I would consider being on the offense when you first get on site, showing off the OMD to the top guy, and bragging about the new equipment being the newest award winning technology, and you felt it important to keep up with the latest in photo technology.
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Old Mar 10, 2013, 12:28 PM   #6
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As many have pointed out the best "pro" photographers are often the best at selling themselves and managing their customer relations with no special photography skills beyond the normal competence that most people can achieve. The really talented photographers often times lack the marketing and managing skills to achieve the success they probably deserve.
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Old Mar 10, 2013, 3:41 PM   #7
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With strobes, softbox or umbrella, tripod and backdrop - no one is going to notice the size of the camera. It will be a non-issue - especially if you've done work with the client before. How you setup and run your shoot will do more to give the subjects a sense of your professionalism than the size of the camera.
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Old Mar 10, 2013, 9:48 PM   #8
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Thank you all for your comments. I will admit that part of the concern on my part is that it has been a few years since I shot professionally. I used to travel from coast to coast shooting everything and anything, but that was back in 35mm film days.

But as to the concern about full frame versus say the m4/3s -- I had a long chat with relative back in England that reps a number of photogs in London about the stock business and assignment shooting. Eventually the subject of cameras came up and as he saw it, his clients would not stand for anything less than full frame, no matter who was handling the camera... It is this comment that haunts me...
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Old Mar 10, 2013, 9:54 PM   #9
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They're definitely out there alright, and there's not much you can do about them but let them have what they want. Have you said anything to the people you would be doing this gig for? The only thing worse than not finding out before-hand, would be finding out the day of.
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Old Mar 10, 2013, 10:03 PM   #10
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........
........................
......................
...Eventually the subject of cameras came up and as he saw it, his clients would not stand for anything less than full frame, no matter who was handling the camera... It is this comment that haunts me...
You may find it interesting to read this current thread in the Four-thirds forum, and especially the explanation from Jim Lucas (WigPro). He is very experinced in the commercial printing industry and has some very pertinent comments.


http://forum.fourthirdsphoto.com/f2/...ing-74442.html
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