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Old Jan 20, 2004, 2:27 PM   #1
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Default Painting a Poinsettia

Using a flashlight, a dark basement, and a lot of guesswork involving many frames, I finally settled on a 5-second shutter speed and a 2.4 aperture which produced this photo of a Christmas poinsettia "painted" with a moving flashlight beam. (I don't know why, but after uploading the image, it lost a bit of its sharpness. Honestly, it's not out of focus.)

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Old Jan 20, 2004, 4:12 PM   #2
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Nice. They never look the same after you reduce the size and resave them as jpg and then again sometimes when you load them to the server. I've really noticed substantial changes from my original .tiff file to the final web-based jpg file. Couple that with most people don't have calibrated monitors, no telling WHAT they're seeing.

I like the work.
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Old Jan 20, 2004, 10:17 PM   #3
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Very nice shot. Lots of messing around I would guess. It has a really neat feel to it. One thing I don't like is the vertical line on the left side of the image. It is very faint but noticeable. Lou
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Old Jan 21, 2004, 7:58 AM   #4
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Quote:
One thing I don't like is the vertical line on the left side of the image.
I hadn't noticed it until your mention of it. Concerned, I opened up the original in Photoshop and viewed it at 100%, then 200%, then 300%. There's no vertical line, so what we must be seeing is something that happened when it was converted to JPEG.
Quote:
Lots of messing around I would guess.
Yes. The camera had to be set to totally manual operation so I could control aperture and shutter speed without the camera making erronious decisions for the circumstance. That's where all the "messing around" happened because I didn't want to do a lot of post-processing. I wanted to get as close to traditional painting-with-light techniques as possible, not because I'm some kind of purist, but because I plan to use this technique to create double- and triple-exposures. To this end, I need to know precise settings for the camera.
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Old Jan 21, 2004, 9:33 PM   #5
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Barbara,
Lots of credit for taking the plunge.
As to the photo - marginal.
As to the technique - you got my vote.
Aloha
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Old Jan 22, 2004, 10:43 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by selvin
Barbara,
Lots of credit for taking the plunge.
As to the photo - marginal.
As to the technique - you got my vote.
Aloha
Yup, it's definitely marginal, but the idea behind it has me all fired up. Somewhere in time, I saw a collection of photos done this way. They were stunning black and whites, and I remember thinking, "What would they look like in color?" I'm determined to find out. Of course, in the process, I might actually learn how to operate my camera.
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Old Jan 28, 2004, 6:42 PM   #7
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Thanks for sharing, Barbara

I like it!

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Old Jan 28, 2004, 7:33 PM   #8
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Thanks, Digcamfan. My camera waits patiently in the basement while I search for a moving victim.
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Old Jan 28, 2004, 8:37 PM   #9
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Quote:
hadn't noticed it until your mention of it. Concerned, I opened up the original in Photoshop and viewed it at 100%, then 200%, then 300%. There's no vertical line, so what we must be seeing is something that happened when it was converted to JPEG.
If you're talking about the two vertical lines on the left side, they certainly look like part of the wall to me. Rather than look at the original photograph, I'd go back to the basement and look at the setup and the walls behind. Here it is with the lights on :lol:

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Old Jan 29, 2004, 6:57 AM   #10
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Well, there it is, by gum! This calls for Sergio's inventive method for getting rid of sneaky little blotches within the black. Check it out in "Found in the basement." I already used it on the first photo in that thread, finding his method a godsend.
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