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Old Feb 1, 2004, 5:42 PM   #1
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Default A cold sunday

Hi All,

Just some shots I took earlier today. I wanted to see how the Photoshops RAW file functions worked so I did some shooting in RAW mode with my D10.







Gotta figure out what all of the knobs and sliders do...
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Old Feb 2, 2004, 3:20 PM   #2
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Temperature = white balance
Tint = fine tuning for white balance (left is green, right is magenta)
Exposure = exposure compensation (-2 f-stops up to +4 f-stops)
Shadows = increase or decrease the number of values pushed to black
Brightness, Contrast, Saturation = subtle versions of what's in Photoshop
Sharpness = close to Unsharp Mask
Luminance Smoothing = reduce high ISO noise
Color Noise Reduction = controls color aliasing
Chromatic Aberration R/C = deal with purple fringing
Chromatic Aberration B/Y = deal with blue or yellow fringing
Calibrate tab = basically, hue/saturation adjustments where you can change a color like that
of a cyan-colored sky to something more blue, then increase or decrease its saturation
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Old Feb 2, 2004, 5:12 PM   #3
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Looks like you did a fairly good job converting. Could have tweaked the white balance a bit on #2 to get rid of some of the color cast but that can also be corrected in PS afterwards.

With practice, you'll soon be tweaking the RAW images without hesitation and the slides become 2nd nature. A tweak on color temperature, a tweak on exposure and you're off to PS. Remember, we don't expose our images for "TRUE" color (unless we're doing critical product shots, like fabric swatches), we expose them for what pleases our eyes.

Personally, I don't do any sharpening in RAW conversion, saving that for the last step in PS. Others think a slight pre-sharpening is in order. There is no hard and fast rule here. I also leave the 3rd and 4th tab settings at their defaults (unless there is an OBVIOUS problem)
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Old Feb 2, 2004, 5:26 PM   #4
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I agree with Ohenry on the sharpening issue, though I had strong reason to use both Luminance Smoothing and Color Noise Reduction this past week after shooting pictures in the basement where my husband and son were playing pool. I wanted the pictures to be dark and moody, so using a flash was out. This meant I had to increase shutter speed to a point where my aperture wanted desperately to be wider, but it was open as far as it could go. Result? Noise.

So, though you can and probably should do as little correction as possible other than the basics, those extra sliders can come in handy now and then.
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 3:27 AM   #5
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Thanks for the tips everyone! It'll be a new step to the process now that I plan on shooting in RAW all the time. IT will also force me to change my archiving methods too. Now I'll have to do a base conversion of all of the RAW files to JPEG then tag and classify the photos for storage along with the RAW files.

I'm starting to use ACDSee's built in DB to build a more coherent retrieval system and luckily it sort of reads EXIF.

I know what you mean about noise though. I shot:




With zero flash, freehand (well leaning against the gabage can), during a big storm last year and the original image was waaaay dark. Gotta love those level adjustments... Now I only wish I had shot in RAW mode so I could have had more processing options with it.

Noisy as it is I think it still turned out nice.
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 8:47 AM   #6
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I agree, Michael. Noise doesn't harm this photo in the least. There are even times when noise actually enhances a photo just as grain does in film photography.

Because you didn't go into huge detail, I got wondering if, besides the RAW and JPEG files, you'll be saving a standard uncrompressed version of your "processed" photos in TIF or PSD. I would most strongly recommend this if you aren't currently doing so.
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