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Old Jun 22, 2004, 12:17 AM   #1
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About three weeks ago I began a rather large project--scanning all my 35 mm slides. I am currently working on a collection of slides that are 35 years old. Needless to say, they are dirty and badly faded.

I have discovered that Paint Shop Pro 8 can work miracles. I have created a script that does the following:
1. Small scratch removal -- aggressive
2. Fade correction -- 45
3. Automatic contrast adjustment
4. Clarify
5. Automatic saturation adjustment
6. Unsharp mask -- 2/100/5

Here is an example of a slide taken in Kowloon, accross the harbor from Hong Kong. This was taken in October, 1969.

Before restoration:


After restoration:


As you can see, it is not perfect, but it is a significant improvement.

Cal Rasmussen
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 4:38 AM   #2
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Quote:
... it is a significant improvement.
Yes it is. I use PSP8 to. I don't think it would be as good as Photoshop for creating pictures from scratch. But it is very powerful and undervalued by lots of people.
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 9:11 AM   #3
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Cal, what film scanner are you using? I've bought 2 in the past 2 years, and returned both because I was not satisfied in one way or another with what I got out of them. I better decide on a decent scanner for slides quickly as some of my older slides are already in the process of degrading (holes in emulsion, etc).
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 10:43 AM   #4
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I am using a Minolta Dimage Scan Dual III with a maximum resolution of 2820 dpi. The new Scan Dual IV has a resolution of 3400 dpi. The 2820 is not as sharp as I would like to be. I find that my Nikon D100 produces sharper images than the scanner. However, for most applications, the scanner does a great job with both slides and negatives. It can also handle APS film cartridges with a special addon adapter.

The cost of the Scan Dual III was around $300. I don't know the price of the IV.
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Old Jun 23, 2004, 12:52 AM   #5
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Well, I've tried out both the Minolta Scan Elite II and the Scan Elite 5400. The 5400 was great in terms of resolution but I had problems with speed (10-30 mins / scan at max res) and strange horizontal green lines across denser areas of the transparencies I was scanning.

It sounds like the models you are, or have been, using do not have an infrared capability for scratch removal? Don't you find this to be a problem on your older slides?
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Old Jun 23, 2004, 2:19 AM   #6
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geoffs wrote:
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Cal, what film scanner are you using? .....I better decide on a decent scanner for slides quickly as some of my older slides are already in the process of degrading
I'm in the same position, but I'm not even attempting to scan any but the best slides because it's so time-consuming. I'm transcribing all of them to the soon-to-be defunct VHS video format by projecting them on a 10x8 white card and recording a slide show with my Video8 camcorder. Even to continue this project, I had to hunt for a replacement projector that would take the Hanimex Rondex 120-slide rotary magazines in which they're all stored. [I got one, fully manual and no fan, off the top shelf of my local camera shop for 7 ukpounds!].

Do any of you use Ed Hamrick's 'Vuescan' software (www.hamrick.com)? It completely revolutionised my filmscanning, as it's so much better (many say) than the proprietary scanner software. The latest versions have a wonderful WYSIWG interface that makes scanning (relatively) quick & easy. I have a now-antique Year 2000 Acer Scanwit 2720s SCSI filsmcanner, myself. An Englishman called Tony Sleep used to run a filmscanners email-based discussion group, about as good as 'Steve's Forums' in terms of support & advice, and if it's still going it'd be a good place for dicussing the latest filmscanners.
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Old Jun 23, 2004, 5:08 AM   #7
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If you're projecting them onto a wall and recording them with VHS, can't you project them and take a picture with your digital camera? Sure it would be slightly degraded, but not as much as with VHS. You could then make a slide show CD.
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Old Jun 23, 2004, 8:21 AM   #8
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ferny wrote:
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If you're projecting them onto a wall and recording them with VHS, can't you project them and take a picture with your digital camera?
Quite right. In fact I've suggested it several times to folk looking for cheap quick fixes here in Steve's Forums. However, with regard to my VHS project "I've started so I'll finish".

It is, of course, easier to get a family group sat round the telly than round the computer in its boxroom. Also I've recorded a commentary with the taped slide show. The magnitude of these tasks is daunting, however you do it.

BTW, I notice that fully-featured VHS VCRs can be had for approx 30 ukpounds at present, so I aim to have at least one stashed away in the attic with an analogue UHF-input telly.

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Old Jun 23, 2004, 11:38 AM   #9
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I have had a film scanner for years. But I only do scans for printing or putting online. The project of digitizing all of my old film and slides is far too daunting with a simple film scanner without true hardware Digital Ice. I have well over a thousand images to scan.

I'm about to order an Epson 4870 flatbed. The film and slide scans are good for anything through 8 X 10 prints. It will scan 4 film strips or 8 slides at once with a true Digital Ice. The film scanner he uses here (Nikon LS 1000) is probably equal to my film scanner and the 4870 outperforms it:
http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/int...870/page_7.htm On page 9 he uses a LS4000 and it outperforms the flatbed, but if you look back on page 8 at the original and size of the blowup the 4870 doesn't do that badly.

Also notice the grain on the dedicated film scanners. The concentrated light source enhances the grain so you probably need Neat Image even for ASA 100 film. It isn't as much of a problem with slides, but I have only a few boxes still surviving.

I use Ed Hamrick's Vue Scan on my film scanner, but I am going to try the Epson scanning software without it. I think it will be easier to select say 24 images and scan them all at once. The reviewer liked the Epson software better than the lite Silverfast included with the scanner, and that isn't bad software.

Will the 4870 give scans equal to a good dedicated film scanner with true hardware Digital Ice? No way. But if it competes favorably with a LS1000 it will probably compete well with any 2750 PPI dedicated scanner. And it will do a bunch at once and apply true hardware Digital Ice. Maybe something to consider for anyone like me who has lots of images to convert. If I want a big blowup from one I can always have it professionally done on a drum scanner, and that will be better than about anything you can do at home.

This is a Photoshop restoration. A little more contrasty than I would have chosen, but I was trying to get somewhere near your PSP image. If I were printing it I would clone out the bars or just crop inside them.


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Old Jun 23, 2004, 11:48 AM   #10
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The TWAIN interface for the Minolta scanner has two filters that I am not using. One is "dust brush" which performs a function similar to "Automatic Small Scratch Removal" in PSP. I used to use that but it about triples the time to acquire the image in PSP.

The second is called "Pixel Polish". I am not using that and am not sure what it does.

The scanner interface also includes the usual color, brightness, contrast, and curve functions. I don't use any of those. I do those corrections in PSP8.

I am not sure what those bars were. It was 35 years ago and I think I was on a moving tour bus, shooting out the window. Consequently, they may be part of the window frame.
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