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Old Oct 27, 2004, 10:43 PM   #1
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Here are some shots of tonight's Lunar eclipse. They progress from about 50% to 100% eclipse. Nikon D100, Nikon 80-300mm zoom, Quantaray 2x telextender, tripod, self-timer to compensate for shaky tripod. I started shooting at 50% with ISO 200, and was at ISO 800 when the eclipse reached 100%. I used manual focus, although trying to focus on something that dim was difficult.











Note--This my first time ever, shooting the moon with any kind of camera.

Cal Rasmussen
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Old Oct 27, 2004, 11:13 PM   #2
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Well done! I watched it from Chester, England, through patchy cloud, but failed dismally to record it on my Hi8 camcorder. Last time we had one of these total lunar eclipses I got good Video8 but no stills. Camcorders were the only devices sensitive enough in those days, because cheap consumer digicams hadn't been invented yet.

My 13-yr-old son asked to be woken up to see it, but then toddled off down the road to his grannie's house for the night, so the best he'll get is your pictures. Thanks very much!
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Old Oct 27, 2004, 11:28 PM   #3
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i think a run through neat image and some possible sharpening would do wonders here cal!

great shots! moon shots are tough...mainly for exposure...you apparently went for details in the darker areas...in the "shadow"...

that shows wat this is the best...but you overexpose the sunlit spots...

the only way to overcome that problem, is to shoot two shots, and blend them...but that's especially tough for moon shots...

anyway lol, very well done for a first time...well...very well done for any time!

Vito
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Old Oct 28, 2004, 12:00 AM   #4
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Another way to handle the exposure/contrast problem is to use a graduated neutral density filter. There was one in my camera bag about a half block from where I was shooting. It never occured to me to use it. It never occured to me that contrast would be a problem. Maybe next time...

Cal
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Old Oct 28, 2004, 12:10 AM   #5
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I was so disappointed that I didn't get to see it first hand but thanks for the pics. I went outside to look for it and there were too many clouds to even guess where the moon was. An hour before, I remember looking at the moon with only minimal clouds

Now, the solar eclipse is just around the corner
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Old Oct 28, 2004, 12:18 AM   #6
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calr wrote:
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graduated neutral density filter...... never occured to me to use it. It never occured to me that contrast would be a problem.
Who's worrying? They're great shots, and took a lot of effort. You aren't a NASA scientist, are you? So what you're after is a good (and preferably artistic) record of this event, and you did it brilliantly.

Would that I could have done the same. (I did manage some good total solar eclipse shots in 1999.)
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Old Oct 28, 2004, 12:28 AM   #7
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um...i'll remove this if you want...

but, i was wondering...wat do you need to do to see a solar eclipse? i know you need some kind of glass to filter out the harmful rays...

lol, just wondering...if one's coming around the corner...i'd like to shoot it if possible!

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Old Oct 28, 2004, 12:51 AM   #8
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photosbyvito wrote:
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wat do you need to do to see a solar eclipse?
First, find your solar eclipse and travel to somewhere where it's visible. Then...

I used old floppy disks as filters when I photographed the total eclipse in '99. I've posted the results here somewhere & I'll let you know when I've found a link to them.

BUT...

================================================== =====

You **MUST** be very careful of your eyesight when viewing the sun,whether eclipsed or not. Permanent retinal damage is very, very easy. You're embarking on a career as a photographer, and you'll need good eyesight.

================================================== ======

If you look at all the stuff here recently over the transit of Venus, it's all directly applicable to solar eclipses.

Good luck, and mind your eyes!
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Old Oct 28, 2004, 10:10 AM   #9
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When is that solar eclipse and where will it be visible?
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Old Oct 28, 2004, 12:36 PM   #10
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These are great, I just wish I had the right "stuff" to take shots like these....
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