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Old Mar 9, 2005, 1:35 AM   #11
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Kenneth,

Thanks for looking anyway.

abw,

Canna
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Old Mar 14, 2005, 10:09 PM   #12
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Well, personally I like the "after" picture much better than the "before". Just think how alarmed we would be if the shots were reversed.


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Old Mar 14, 2005, 11:42 PM   #13
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ALASKANS FOR GLOBAL WARMING.........Bring it on!
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Old Mar 15, 2005, 7:25 PM   #14
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Here's a good experiment to try. Close all windows in your home, and close all doors. Get 100 cigarettes and light them with fire inside your house. Then 50 metal rubbish bins, and fill them up with fuel, paper, wood etc....light them up with fire inside your house. Measure the temperature throughout the duration of the event, and visually monitor the pollution inside the house.

You might notice that the same thing is going on with the world today...just on a bigger scale.
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Old Mar 15, 2005, 10:43 PM   #15
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I live directly on the water just a few feet above sea level. There is an ice shelf in Antarctica that would put my lower floor under water permanently if it ever broke off, and they say it is getting weak. So global warming is significant to me.

There is certainly a part of global warming attributable to human activity. Not only with our putting the greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere but also in things like clearing large parts of the world's rain forests. Those are large carbon sinks that are being burned to release that carbon.

I have read articles that say the ocean's ability to absorb excessive amounts of greenhouse gasses might be limited. They are predicting some ecological disasters associated with changing the Ph of the oceans and problems like red tide and algae blooms that could actually inhibit the ocean's ability to absorb CO2. Unintended consequences are the order of the day messing with the environment.

As far as the Inuit are concerned I will cry for them when they stop hunting whales with motor boats and hunting game on snowmobiles. They might want to give up their electricity and oil heaters before throwing stones from their glass houses as well.

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Old Mar 17, 2005, 12:08 PM   #16
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It seems as if there are trade offs with everything. We are humbled and brought to our knees at times (most of it in our minds) by the snow and freezing temperatures in the northern latitudes. But, a lot of warm, sunny places are full of crazy people who spend a lot of time trying to kill each other. Hmmm....now, why can't we just shift the situation so that the crazy buggers get all the ice and snow and allow us in the frozen north to mothball our parkas for a few years, at least? I think a tremendously huge sheet of some highly reflective light weight stuff ought to be put into orbit, reflecting sunlight to us up north. And to balance it, a huge shade producing sheet could blot the sun from the conflict areas, now bathed in sunshine. This would swap the hot/cold areas, giving the hot heads a chance to cool off, (as well as spend all their time trying to keep warm) and us frozen pacifists could plant banana crops.:lol:Well, why not? What's your idea... Best regards...

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Old Mar 29, 2005, 1:45 PM   #17
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At the end of the most recent ice age, it is estimated that the ice dam that held back Lake Missoula broke and reformed 39 times. Each time this happened, a huge amount of water flowed across northern Idaho and eastern Washington on it's way to the Pacific Ocean. These floods left behind the Channel Scablands in eastern Washington and the Columbia RiverGorge. Most people have seen thesmall sand ripples that form at the shoreline of a sandy beach. The Lake Missoula outflows caused this type of rippling in the bottom of the lower Columbia River that are 10 to 15 feet high. These ripples are visible today near the Portland Airporton an ordinary fisherman's depthfinder.

Compared to these historical events, a glacier receeding a couple of miles over the course of 44 years is a really insignificant change. The affected people deserve our compassion and help, but the notion that humankind can have any significant effect, good or bad, on long-term global climate systems says more about us than it does about climate.

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Old Mar 31, 2005, 12:55 AM   #18
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Sorry, I typed before I thought...so am retracting it.


abw

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