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Old May 10, 2005, 7:38 PM   #1
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Took a few pictures in my back yard of Jupiter last night with my Canon S1 IS. It wasn't a real good sky for astronomy, but wanted to get some practice and critiques before I spend the better part of an evening on a mountain top getting a clearer shot.

I used the full 10X zoom, plus my new 1.6X teleconverter. Used Av mode and set the f-stop as open as the camera would allow. Shot at ISO 100 to avoid noise in the black background. Manual focus to infinity.

Any pointers for future shots will be appreciated.

Thanks


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Old May 21, 2005, 4:36 PM   #2
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Wheres the picture?
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Old Jun 5, 2005, 1:51 PM   #3
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Here it is. Actully, this one I did shutter speed priority.




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Old Jun 18, 2005, 7:43 AM   #4
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Tried Jupiter again, last night. Again used the Canon S1 IS, but added a Raynox DCR250 super macro lens, anc connected the camera to a Meade ETX-125 scope.


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Old Jun 20, 2005, 10:37 AM   #5
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are these lensflares or the actual stars? sorry, don't know much about that.

Regarding the technical aspects:
Did you use spot metering? It helps to avoid the blown out whites.
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Old Jun 20, 2005, 11:36 AM   #6
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kex wrote:
Quote:
are these lensflares or the actual stars? sorry, don't know much about that.

Regarding the technical aspects:
Did you use spot metering? It helps to avoid the blown out whites.

The foursmall objects are the Galilean satellites of Jupiter. From the left of the picture to the right: Ganymede, Europa, Io and Callisto. You can identify them using the Sky & Telescope Jupiter's MoonsJavaScript Utilitywebsite for 18 June at 02:00 GMT, http://skyandtelescope.com/observing...icle_830_1.asp#

I didn't use any metering.I set thecamera to the manual mode and used trial and error. Probably took about 40 shots to get just a few that were usable. TheMeade 6"telescope has an effective f-stop off/15 and with the macro lens added to my camera, it's probably more like f/22 or more. I used an ISO of 400 (at lower levels, you don't pick up the satellites), and used various shutter speedsfrom 1 sec up. The picture I posted above was at a shutter speed of 0.3 seconds.

I need to experiment some more. I can get the satellites as I've done already. I could thencapture Jupiter using spot metering as you suggest, and then clone both pictures tocome up witha good composite. Thanks for the tip.
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Old Jun 22, 2005, 8:19 AM   #7
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Another effort last night with clear skys over western NC. This is a Photoshop composite of two photos. The photo of the moons was taken at 1/5 sec, while the photo of Jupiter was taken at 1/100 sec. The four moons from left to right are Europa, Io, Ganymede and Callisto.

Canon S1 IS, Meade ETX-125 telescope
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