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Old Jul 8, 2016, 7:45 AM   #1
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Default Light & Shadow - NSFW

Olivia:



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Old Jul 9, 2016, 9:47 AM   #2
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Beautiful !

There's just something about B&W that is compelling.

(Often applies to films/movies too. Less is more?)

Also, Ive been noticing the push for 4K video, but I have to point out that, as in photography, detail/sharpness has its place, but is not always effective or appropriate (eg, can actually be fatiquing). In some scientific work (more often than not) yes, but in art often no (eg, over sharp).
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Old Jul 9, 2016, 3:57 PM   #3
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I wonder if young people today view B&W in the same way as us old folk. We watched B&W tv, saw B&W movies, had our photos printed in B&W so there is more of a nostalgic feel to B&W. People born after 1980 dont have any connection with B&W so I wonder what they feel towards a B&W image and if their preference would be color. Really like your second shot. I have a shot I took with a similar pose and I prefer the sepia version of it compared to the color.
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Old Jul 9, 2016, 6:11 PM   #4
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Why It’s Still Important to Shoot In Black And White- by David Geffin

"Most photographers ask when should a photograph be converted to black and white. Rarely is the discussion around why a photograph should be black and white from the outset, and that’s fascinating.

While the “when” and “why” are related, shooting in color and then wondering whether to convert the image employs a very different mindset from setting out and seeing the world in black and white, and then working within those confines. Parameters of a world without color forces you to see things differently, to stretch and work out your photographic eye muscles, and that in turn pushes you creatively (at least in my experience it has).

Shooting with black and white film predominantly for the last 6 months has been one of the single most important aspects of my photographic development this last year. It has helped push not only my digital stills work, but I’ve seen the video work I do be shaped by shooting black and white stills. If you look at my Instagram feed or work going onto my Facebook page, you’ll see most of it is in black and white nowadays, with commercial work or video work creeping in from time to time.

I almost guarantee that if you spend some time shooting in black and white, you’ll start to notice some changes in what and how you shoot too. These have been the key reasons I’ve seen the change in my own work
"


- Color No Longer Distracts

- You’ll See Light Differently

- It Helps Emphasize Emotion

- The Timeless / Classic Quality From Black And White

- It Amplifies How You Use Negative Space

- It Highlights Shape, Form and Pattern In The Image

- To Highlight Beauty and Skin Tones

- It Helps Focus On Composition

https://fstoppers.com/education/why-...nd-white-48141
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Old Jul 11, 2016, 11:09 AM   #5
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Thanks Guys,

An image I dig up that tries to encompass most of the items above:
Asia @ The Watershed - NSFW
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Old Aug 2, 2016, 12:00 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdromel View Post
Why It’s Still Important to Shoot In Black And White- by David Geffin

"Most photographers ask when should a photograph be converted to black and white. Rarely is the discussion around why a photograph should be black and white from the outset, and that’s fascinating.

While the “when” and “why” are related, shooting in color and then wondering whether to convert the image employs a very different mindset from setting out and seeing the world in black and white, and then working within those confines. Parameters of a world without color forces you to see things differently, to stretch and work out your photographic eye muscles, and that in turn pushes you creatively (at least in my experience it has).

Shooting with black and white film predominantly for the last 6 months has been one of the single most important aspects of my photographic development this last year. It has helped push not only my digital stills work, but I’ve seen the video work I do be shaped by shooting black and white stills. If you look at my Instagram feed or work going onto my Facebook page, you’ll see most of it is in black and white nowadays, with commercial work or video work creeping in from time to time.

I almost guarantee that if you spend some time shooting in black and white, you’ll start to notice some changes in what and how you shoot too. These have been the key reasons I’ve seen the change in my own work
"


- Color No Longer Distracts

- You’ll See Light Differently

- It Helps Emphasize Emotion

- The Timeless / Classic Quality From Black And White

- It Amplifies How You Use Negative Space

- It Highlights Shape, Form and Pattern In The Image

- To Highlight Beauty and Skin Tones

- It Helps Focus On Composition

https://fstoppers.com/education/why-...nd-white-48141
Great points and agree with you. To add to your list I notice the difference in the textures of the different elements in the image. Such as skin and rock or smooth and course. I notice those little things more when composing a shot with the idea of it being B&W.

NHL, the B&W image is an excellent example of classic artistic portraiture.
Well done.
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Old Aug 2, 2016, 2:57 PM   #7
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The soft lighting in both these shots is just right to suggest rather than explicitly delineate. (OK, that sounded a bit pretentious, but is close to what I want to say) The first evokes a bit of nostalgia or sadness, and the second is contemplative. (Rodin's 'The Thinker')
Love both, and the only quibble I have is the positioning of her left big toe in the second. (Hate to even bring it up)

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Old Aug 3, 2016, 9:34 AM   #8
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Thanks, for the feedback.
I'll need to work on some "liquifying" then
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Old Aug 9, 2016, 2:56 PM   #9
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Wonderful looking fine art B&W photo.
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