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Old Jul 13, 2002, 8:03 PM   #1
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Default Epson 1280 or 2200?

I think this will be a good discussion form. Anyway, I've made up my mind. It's going to be the 2200.

- CyberFlaw
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Old Jul 14, 2002, 6:17 PM   #2
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right choice. it will require a little more setup though.

i have a 1270 will go over in about 3 months.

the only thing to discuss is cost per print and if its worth it. if your doing business yes. intend to do b/w yes. you got the money to spend yes
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Old Aug 22, 2002, 2:27 PM   #3
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Default Not happy with new 2200!

I've just moved from an Epson 1270 (which was FABULOUS!) to a new 2200. And I'm not happy with the print quality. No matter what settings I've tried or what paper, I can't seem to get a result as good as I got with the 1270.

Results seem to lack contrast. And results seem no sharper/detailed at all, to the eye or with a loup, than with the 1270.

I guess in addition to that major disappointment, I have two others: First that the Epson "film" media is not supported (and printing to it anyway, regardless of the setting doesn't give results as good as with the 1270), and second, the fact that with mat paper, borderless printing is not supported.

Has anyone had any more success with this new printer than I have?

Thanks...

Tim
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Old Aug 22, 2002, 5:36 PM   #4
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Tim,
What cam, res yyou shooting and what is print 2880?
Gary
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Old Aug 27, 2002, 12:10 PM   #5
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Hi Gary,

I use both a Nikon 5000 and Canon G2 (and others from time to time). 2880 resolution is the highest that printer supports, on appropriate media.

My comparisons are using the same image, to the same media and size, printed from my Epson 1270 and from the new 2200. I have yet to get even as good results on the 2200 as I get with the 1270.

And I'm VERY disappointed that my two favorite media, the photo quality inkjet paper (for quick proofs) and the photo quality "film" are not supported by this new printer. Nor is there any equivalent replacement to those media types.
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Old Aug 27, 2002, 12:39 PM   #6
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Hi TD27,

Items not supported as 2200 uses pigment ink not designed for the uses you mention.
Buy the tool,"printer or whatever", designed for the task.
Try driving a carpet tack with a sledge hammer!
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Old Aug 27, 2002, 4:50 PM   #7
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So what is the 2200 designed for? How would you summarize it? Seriously.

From everything I'd heard, it was supposed to be the best inkjet printer for printing photos. No one ever suggested it would be only for use with non-glossy paper, and even then with reduced contrast as well.

What paper/setting combination would you recommend to get the very best results this printer can produce? I'd love to see an example of the best, and then I could judge if it's as good as my 1270.

Ok, I've given up on the photo quality inkjet paper, and on the photo quality "film" for use with this printer.

I've bought and tried all the supported paper types for this printer (except for the watercolor paper) and tried all kinds of settings with each (small fortune so far). And there hasn't been a single result which I could point to and say is better than the 1270.

Please, tell me what I should try to get the best example this printer can do...

Thanks.
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Old Aug 28, 2002, 1:46 AM   #8
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Hey TD27,
I've had a chance to try the 2200 on different media. I found the premimum lustur and the heavyweight matt paper the best for printing photos. And, print your images at 1440 dpi.
I have to say, I didn't see a big difference between the 2200 output and 1280 output. Although, when it comes to printing Black and white, I preferr the 2200 because of it's additional black.
I hope this helps.

- Cyberflaw
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Old Aug 28, 2002, 4:36 PM   #9
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Cyberflaw, as you suggested on another thread, I'll investigate with my dealer if I can try another 2200 just in case the one I have is faulty.

I've tried the premium lustre and matte papers and wasn't impressed.

I used 2880 dpi because I read a good review of the printer where the fellow was comparing the 2200 with 2000 and said on the 2200 the higher resolution WAS worth using. And since I was really testing to see what the best was that this printer could produce, well, I used that.

Thanks.
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Old Aug 31, 2002, 5:05 AM   #10
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I print for retail sales using the 1270 and literally wore
the thing out printing my stuff until the printhead spewed
magenta lines all over the place. The 1280
was the obvious next printer for me, which I did purchase.

I found that the 1280 does not quite have the saturation
or 'punch' that the 1270 had, but it's very close and not
a problem to fix with software editing.

I've used over 70 cartridges of T009 in my work.
I mainly print using the default resolution (720) and challenge
anybody to tell the difference between a 720, 1440, or 2880
dpi Epson image on Matte HW or Premium Gloss, either using the
1270 or 1280 or any other printer for that matter. The resolution
differences are negligeable and are so vastly overated.

The 'monitoring chip' on Epson cartridges may be Epson's greatest mistake
not allowing users to decide when the cartridge is truly finished - but it's
also a great way to maintain quality control. I hate being told by
software when to replace a cartridge. But I can't argue with the
quality and longevity of prints made with their stuff.

Canon printers and media are not even in the running yet for
professional uses until proven. Steve might like the 9000,
but I know what the 1270 and 1280 can do. Never had the
dreaded 'orange fade' bullshit problem so many
touted as being hell, and I've yet to see a fading problem
with prints in direct sunlight for over 2 years pinned to a wall
in my tests.

Best thing is that the T009 and T007 inks don't "run" with the slightest
of moisture on most media. My old HP 720 prints turned into
watercolours at the slightest moisture and faded in a few weeks.
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