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Old Feb 5, 2007, 6:02 PM   #1
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My R300 is about 14 months old and as developed an paper feed fault.

It is Ok with 80gm paper , it feeds it perfect, loading a single sheet or 20+

But I have been using 140gm paper for around 3 months and suddenly it doesnt feed through. (Same brand ofpaper during the 3 months).

I can sometimes help it to feed, but when it doesnt it feels that something is stopping the paper on the right hand side of the paper feed (as you look at the front of the printer). Even single sheets have problems feeding through.

It has not had a paper misfeed that has torn a sheet and left pieces inside.

Any ideas on what the problem could be.
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Old Feb 13, 2007, 10:46 PM   #2
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I don't use 140gm paper so can't comment on your problem - but have noticed my R300 degrading recently - including a similar paper feed issue. My issues:
1) Can no longer load more than about 10-20 sheets of 80gm paper - otherwise I get a jam - I used to be able to put in a much larger stack (seems like a similar problem to yours - wonder if there is an alignment problem where a tolerance is off somewhere).
2) the buttons are acting up - sometime none respond until I unplug and plug in the printer. Electronic connection are obviously problematic.
3) the print heads also act up - sometimes I will suddenly get an "unrecognized ink cartridge" error message - have to open and reset all ink cartridges to clear - seems like there is dust or something causing a cartridge to sudden stop reading. This happens randomly - not just when I change the cartridge.
4) I get a "general error: see user manual" error in the middle of printing sometimes - this is the most recent error I have started seeing - have to power down (sometimes power down doesn't work with button so have to unplug due to problem 2 above) and then power printer back up n to clear.

In my case - it is clearly time to buy a new printer - I went through a Canon versus Epson debate last time and given the issues I have had - I am leaning to Canon this time.
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Old Feb 14, 2007, 6:55 AM   #3
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Hi Guys

Would these cleaning sheets be any good ?

Don't think they are for an R300 though

http://www.xlshop.com/moreInfo.asp?c...bGrpCode=COMP1

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Old Feb 14, 2007, 6:50 PM   #4
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Brianc — The righthand side is where the paper is picked up by the feeder (look down there and you'll see the pickup roller.)

140GSM is very marginal for this printer, everything needs to be spot on for the roller to pick it up so just a small build-up of dust or fibre on the roller would probably make it slip instead of bending the paper edge into the gripping position, as also would quite a small amount of wear (this tends to polish the roller, which when new has a rippled surface)

It will tend to pick up fibre from the paper edges over time, so possibly just a careful cleaning of the roller may help — don't use anything that might degrade rubber.

cczych
— Your paper feed problem is quite likely exactly the same thing — polishing of the primary feed roller or dust/fibre buildup to the extent that it slips instead of gripping the paper.

A larger stack will stand more vertical, so the edge of the sheet has to be moved further to pick up and has less tendency to slide over the roller of its own weight, hence the stack works more reliably as it gets thinner — it's also the reason for the use of an undersheet with some grades of photo paper that tend to stick together.

It's something that affects all friction-fed printers at times.

The electrical fault could be one or more dirty or loose connectors resulting in an intermittent contact — the act of unplugging and plugging in again probably gives it a sufficient power jolt to re-establish connection for a period.

Unless rectified this will only get worse over time until the machine doesn't work at all.



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Old Feb 21, 2007, 5:47 PM   #5
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Idle,

My problem is definitely mechanical.

As I said 80gm paper feeds perfect.

But anything thicker and I have the help it through the paper feeder.

Sometimes the edge of the paper is damaged approx 35mm from the left hand edge of the paper. (see attached image). It really is the left hand edge, I had to turn the sheet around to scan it.

I have tried different paper settings to no avail.

Have you or any one seen anything like this :?
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Old Feb 22, 2007, 8:20 PM   #6
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As you say, BrianC, that's definitely mechanical damage.

My guess (it's really just a guess...) is that there's something amiss with the final delivery guide (the one that keeps the paper flat during printing.)

Drop the CD flap, which will lift this section up, and see if you can find any damage or anything stuck in it (the thicker paper will be slightly higher, so your 80GSM probably misses whatever the thicker paper is catching on.)

If you watch the paper feeding though you'll be able to confirm or disprove this — if there's no tear when it comes out the feeder chute to the print head (you'll see it pause whilst the machine confirms its position, then feed up to the print heads), the delivery chute has to be the culprit.

You should be able to measure where the problem lies — paper widths do vary a bit so you need to mark where the left edge actually runs and measure from there.

The trouble will be somewhere along that line, between pickup and exit, and it obviously lifts out of the way eventually, otherwise the tear would extend right down the sheet.

From the look of the damage you should be able to locate a build-up of paper fibre where it's catching.

Best way to actually look under the guide would be a torch and a small mirror.

I've seen similar damage when using coated photo paper that has picked up moisture from atmospheric exposure and curled somewhat — sometimes it has even jammed against this section and had to be discarded.

It came through under the heads OK (well, sometimes a corner would catch as it fed under the heads and be torn or folded over), but would get badly knocked about as it fed into the delivery chute.

Needless to say I now pay more attention to keeping it dry after opening a pack...

I doubt the mechanical tearing has anything to do with the feed problem, though — that's still more than likely just that the pickup roller isn't bending the paper far enough for the feed roller to grab it (slippage.)

I just tried a piece of card stock that's 3 times thicker (.012" according to my dial caliper) than 80GSM paper's .004" through my own machine.

I don't know its actual weight, but math suggests 240GSM — too heavy for just about any consumer inkjet.

It had to be assisted to start, was too thick for the printer's sensors to allow printing, (the heads would have hit it, so the machine didn't start them — well done, Epson!) but fed through without damage.

When you press down on the paper to make it start through, what you are doing is increasing its weight on the roller, thus making it grip better — the roller then bends the edge forward into the feed chute.

If it doesn't flex far enough or quickly enough, then it doesn't start through and you get a feed error.

Do let us know the final outcome.
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Old Apr 4, 2007, 5:07 PM   #7
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I have the R300 and two days ago I printed off 125 fairly photo heavy sheets - by the end I was handfeeding the machine. Basically the paper goes in about 2 inches and then slips against the roller. Is this a polished roller problem? Do I just clean the roller and if so - how? and with what?

Also, I constructed a 'helper' sleeve on the right (facing the printer) almost from day one due to paper skewing through the feed - the sleeve corrected the alignment problem. I just used a thin white cover stock to make the right guide taller - a very simple fold and tape solution.

:P
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Old Apr 4, 2007, 8:47 PM   #8
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Mallory:

If you look carefully at the R300's paper feed system you'll see that it's basically four stages:

First the sheet is pushed forward to where the primary roller (the grey one in the corner nearest the head park end of the printer with a crepe-rubber like surface) can pick it up, the primary roller bends it forward and pushes it the first two inches or so (this is where you can see the end of the sheet protrude a short distance and stop), the sensor detects that it's there and the platen roller lifts and presses the paper against the six rollers that then control the actual printing speed and line positioning, and finally the six rubber rollers take over and deposit the finished article on the delivery tray.

The most common problem I've seen is the primary roller either not picking the sheet up at all — frequently happens with over-thick or unduly stiff paper and might be overcome by manually pressing the sheet down to increase the roller's grip — or picking it up too late in the cycle so that it either doesn't move far enough for the sensor to pick it up or jams against the edge of the platen.

The primary roller's crepe-like coating can become polished over time, and it can also accumulate dust and fibres from the cut edge of the paper, both of which will make it more likely to slip, particularly with thicker paper which offers more resistance to bending and also sheds more garbage in the process.

Office supply houses used to carry a product which can restore the roller's surface and make it grip properly again — maybe they still do (I've been out of the loop for almost a quarter century now...)

To just clean it, a damp lint-free cloth should do the trick (you'll find you can rotate the roller with a finger) — make sure it's fully dry before using the printer again.

You may also find a build-up of paper fibre and dust in the paper path that will place an extra load on the feed train — again there used to be a cleaning sheet that took care of this (it was primarily for laser printers, but should work with inkjets)



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Old Apr 4, 2007, 9:01 PM   #9
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Idle -

Thank you so much -

Would you know anything about an older Epson 3000?

It ran fine about 2 years ago - sat dormant for more than a year - then when it was turned back on - everything sounds like it is printing but nothing comes out - the heads run across the carriage. Are there ink tubes and could such be clogged and if so how do I clean them?

:roll:
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Old Apr 4, 2007, 9:32 PM   #10
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I'm pretty sure the 3000 has ink tubes (the cartridges don't travel with the heads, the ink is in collapsible sacs inside the carts) but I've never seriously looked at one.

A friend of mine has one, I'll ask him about it when he comes back (he's overseas right now.)

Meantime, it's far more likely your printer has clogged heads after being unused so long.

Try putting some ammonia-based window cleaner on the parking pads, park the heads and let it soak for a day or so, then run a cleaning cycle or two and see if you get any result.

If you can't manually release the carriage to gain access to the pads, turn the printer on and switch it off at the wall (or pull the plug) while the carriage is moving.

If the cleaning cycles are the same as most Epsons from that era, successive cleans will become increasingly powerful (clean, run a nozzle check, clean again without turning off or printing anything else.)

Sometimes it's necessary to repeat the soak operation, and occasionally injecting cleaning fluid into the heads from the supply side helps — don't know how you'd do that on a 3000, tho', if I recall correctly the tubes hold enough ink for about 100 pages and you'd have to get that out first.

Don't keep running it with no ink flowing — you can damage the heads ($$$!)
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