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Old Mar 6, 2007, 10:14 PM   #1
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The 6700D "QUALITY" print settings do not allow me to move the slider bar to the far right -- #1 setting for the highest quality. The #1 shows "gray." This is a new printer and the software was just installed. Can anyone help with this problem? And also recommend the best settings and profiles, etc., etc. I use the Canon paper, photo glossy pro. I print from photoshop CS2. The prints print too dark and towards the red. Thus they have to be tweeked some. This a waste of paper. I am new to printing. But so far after one "test print or two at he most, the prints are great.

Thanks in advance.

SHEP
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Old Mar 7, 2007, 5:42 AM   #2
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The setting is grayed out if you don't select photopaper first.
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Old Mar 7, 2007, 8:37 AM   #3
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It all depends on which photo paper you are selecting. In order to set the highest level, you need to select Photo Paper Pro. Photo Paper Plus Glossy maximizes to #2.
-Brett
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Old Mar 7, 2007, 10:03 AM   #4
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You'll note that the Canon-supplied profiles give PRx profiles for Photo Paper Pro with x being 1, 2, and 3 (quality levels), while the SPx profiles for Photo Paper Plus, Glossy only have x = 2 and 3. Thus, Canon does not assume (or allow) that you will use this less-expensive paper at the highest quality setting. To get around this, I have ordered a profile for this paper at the highest setting from Cathy's Profiles. It should arrive any day now, and I'll report how well it does.

I should also point out that I have already obtained a "PR1" profile from Cathy's Profiles to replace the Canon-supplied profile for a top-quality Photo Paper Pro print. For the most part the differences between the results of the two profiles are subtle at best. However, for colors going into the true reds and true blues, the results using Cathy's profile are strikingly better. It really perks up (and appears significantly to extend) the further reaches of this printer's gamut in these two directions.

In printing targets for Cathy's Profiles, however, be aware of the Canon print-driver bug that I discribe in an earlier post.
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Old Mar 7, 2007, 7:41 PM   #5
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Thank all of you folks for the help! I thought I would have to re-install the driver or something.

Next question: The EFFECTS tab seems to always default to Simulate Illustration. I have to manually go to the tab and hit the default setting. That unchecks everything on that page. How can I make it automatically "default to nothing checked?

Next question: In MANUAL COLOR ADJUNTMENT, I have three choices: None, Driver matching and ICM. What do I select??

I print from Photoshop CS2. Under ASSIGN PROFILE, I have a huge drop down menu of choices. One id the 6700D profile with PR 1, PR 2, PR 3, SP 2, SP 3. I also have SRGB .....2.1 I also see the monitor type I use. Each setting changes the look of what I see on the monitor. What advice can you all give me.

I know these questions seem lame, but I am a dolt when it comes to printers and computers. And the instructions are "lamer" than me! LOL.

SHEP
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Old Mar 7, 2007, 10:46 PM   #6
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> How can I make it automatically "default to nothing checked?

Try setting everything the way you want, in all the panes including Effects, and then save that setting as a Preset (named as you wish, say, Photo Paper Pro, if that's the paper you've selected). You save Presets by expanding the Preset drop-down menu and selecting the Save item. Then when you print, use that preset, and all should be as you saved it. You can do this for each different paper you use.

> In MANUAL COLOR ADJUNTMENT,* I have three choices:* None, Driver
> matching and* ICM.* What do I select??

If you are using color management by Photoshop (i.e., Let Photoshop Determine Colors), or if you are using No Color Management, this setting should be None. The other Color Correction settings are relevant only if you wish to select Let Printer Determine Colors. If you're using a Mac, a good choice here is ColorSync. The ICM is a Windows thing, and I don't know how well it behaves. If you choose Driver Matching, the default Canon Digital Photo Color is employed, I believe. It is supposed to produce "pleasing colors," but who knows? Defaults in color management are almost never right. Your best bet, however, is to Let Photoshop Determine Colors and choose None here. I'll discuss the profile to use below.

> I print from Photoshop CS2.* Under ASSIGN PROFILE, I have a huge drop
> down menu of choices.* One id the 6700D profile with PR 1, PR 2, PR 3,
>* SP 2,* SP 3.**

The drop-down menu lists all of the profiles available to CS2: Monitor profiles, Working-Space profiles, printer profiles, etc. For this situation you want to select the printer profile relevant to your printer and the paper you will be using. Thus, you want to select the Canon iP6700D profiles; and you want to use PRx if you are using Photo Paper Pro, quality x. Thus, use PR1 for best quality, PR2 for second-best, etc. Likewise use SPx with Photo Paper Plus, Glossy. There is no SP1 because they do not allow the finest quality with this paper (don't ask me why).

Finally, you needn't really use a Custom Setting or Detailed Setting if you are going to do a top quality photo. You can select High (Windows) or Top-Quality Photo (Mac) instead. This will allow the printer to print both directions rather than just one direction, and will be much faster.

This will allow you to get something out of your printer that looks roughly like what is on your screen in Photoshop PROVIDED

a. you have appropriately color-calibrated your monitor and
b. you have properly incorporated your image file into an appropriate working space in Photoshop.

I'm not sure what profile your camera assigns to its images; usually it is sRGB. PS's "Get Info" will tell you. And I am not sure what color space you have chosen for PS's working space. This is usually AdobeRGB or ProPhotoRGB for print images and sRGB for web images, and is chosen in the Edit/Color Settings menu item of PS. If the camera uses sRGB, and your working space is something different, then you want to choose Convert to Working Space when you first open the file in PS. (If PS doesn't ask what to do when you first open a file, you can set the option for it to do so in the same Color Settings dialog.) Then process your file in PS and print using Document as the Source and the appropriate printer profile as indicated above. For Intent, choose either Relative Colorimetric or Perceptual. I find RC tend to do better, but there are times when Perceptual wins out. You can simulate the difference using Soft Proofing in PS.

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