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Old May 4, 2008, 12:19 PM   #1
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I am considering a new printer and my choice now is around to settle on the officejet K5400...

I decided to read the manual before taking the final decision and I found this about the supported media weights:
>------------------------------
>Type_____________________Weight
>Paper ____________________60 to 105 g/m2 (16 to 28 lb bond)
>Photo media ______________280 g/m2(75 lb bond)
>Cards ____________________Up to 200 g/m2 (110 lb index)
>------------------------------


In the supported media sizes, photo media category includes up to legal sized paper..
It makes sense for me to limit the weight as size increases, not viceversa..

How could the printer prints on 280gm 8.5x11" paper; while for a 6x4" card, it can only go up to 200gm... Is there a catch? I want to be able to print 260gm/m2 colour A4 certificates.... Are they going to jam in the printer?
Thank you for your help
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Old May 5, 2008, 5:07 AM   #2
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mrmknet wrote:
Quote:
I am considering a new printer and my choice now is around to settle on the officejet K5400...

I decided to read the manual before taking the final decision and I found this about the supported media weights:
>------------------------------
>Type_____________________Weight
>Paper ____________________60 to 105 g/m2 (16 to 28 lb bond)
>Photo media ______________280 g/m2(75 lb bond)
>Cards ____________________Up to 200 g/m2 (110 lb index)
>------------------------------


In the supported media sizes, photo media category includes up to legal sized paper..
It makes sense for me to limit the weight as size increases, not viceversa..
If you're going for the K5400 make sure you get the version that does not have a duplexer as you're going to need the straight through printer path on the standard or network only model.. In fact I would check that that is indeed available at all on those models (I only have access to dn and dtn models myself).


Quote:
How could the printer prints on 280gm 8.5x11" paper; while for a 6x4" card, it can only go up to 200gm... Is there a catch?
Photo paper has a higher weight because it has various chemicals coating it to make it easy for the paper to absorb and fix the ink. These add weight without adding as much width. I'm pretty sure that's how it works but it would make sense

Quote:
I want to be able to print 260gm/m2 colour A4 certificates.... Are they going to jam in the printer?
If you can, I'd try and find somewhere that will let you try a test print to see if the media you intend to use will feed properly and will work.

You should be reasonably ok but I do know that HP's can be fussy with their media, especially card. You will also want to make sure your intended card is suitable for use with inkjet printers. If it's a glossy card that isn't treated it won't work..


Plenty of folks on here who can add to this though.
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Old May 5, 2008, 5:49 AM   #3
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websnail wrote
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If you're going for the K5400 make sure you get the version that does not have a duplexer as you're going to need the straight through printer path on the standard or network only model.. In fact I would check that that is indeed available at all on those models (I only have access to dn and dtn models myself).
thank you very much, but i am going for the k5400 base model, not the dn nor the dtn. Please confirm that you had access to and it has a manual straight through feed path as the manual doesn't mention anything about it

Quote:
Photo paper has a higher weight because it has various chemicals coating it to make it easy for the paper to absorb and fix the ink. These add weight without adding as much width. I'm pretty sure that's how it works but it would make sense
It makes sense, but third party media are always labeled as "glossy paper".... What to do to understand if they are classified as cards or photo media?


Quote:
You will also want to make sure your intended card is suitable for use with inkjet printers. If it's a glossy card that isn't treated it won't wor
Don't worry, I always check that.


Thank you again, and waiting for your reply
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Old May 5, 2008, 6:26 AM   #4
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mrmknet wrote:
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thank you very much, but i am going for the k5400 base model, not the dn nor the dtn. Please confirm that you had access to and it has a manual straight through feed path as the manual doesn't mention anything about it
I'm afraid I don't have access to one of that particular model so I couldn't give you a definitive yes or no. Best way to find out is find someone with that particular model and/or visit a local shop with it in.. PCWorld, Staples, etc... and look a the back. If it has a slot in the back panel it probably will handle it.


Quote:
It makes sense, but third party media are always labeled as "glossy paper".... What to do to understand if they are classified as cards or photo media?
As a general rule if it says it's photo paper/media then it's not standard card. Normal card will be thicker.. If in doubt I'd ask your supplier for a definitive answer
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Old May 5, 2008, 7:12 AM   #5
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I contacted HP and all the K5400 series do not have manual feed....
What was the maximum paper density and weight you used without problems for the models you tried? and did you try glossy paper?
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Old May 5, 2008, 2:22 PM   #6
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the reason why there is a limit on paper weight is because of the path it as to take through the printer and whey it takes a tight route it wants to flex itself flat, which can result in major paper jams.

the reason for differing sizes and weights what you mention is smaller paper is harder to bend around the path in theprinterthan larger sizes.

this is why some have a rear feed.

if your wanting to print heavy paper then you need to source a printer that can handel the paper weight you have in mind

Gary
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Old May 7, 2008, 10:00 AM   #7
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websnail, I am reading that the k5400 experiences a lot of paper jams even with everyday media, and that its ink don't dry on non-hp paper, and it smudges easily when touched.
As you had access to it, please confirm or deny this fact, because maybe those who said that had faulty printers.
Thanks in advance
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Old May 7, 2008, 10:36 AM   #8
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mrmknet wrote:
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websnail, I am reading that the k5400 experiences a lot of paper jams even with everyday media
HP officejets, like most other HP inkjets do have a high instance of paper feed issue ranging from multi-page pickup to no pickup.

The best way to resolve this is to "Fan-apart" the paper before you load it into the paper tray and the rubber rollers do need a little TLC from time to time to get rid of the residue from papers and get their grip back. (eg: http://www.pcwb.com/catalogue/item/SAFE23N)

Quote:
...and that its ink don't dry on non-hp paper,
That's absolute cast iron b*llox... (I soooo love marketing spiel) Plain paper will accept and dry fine with HP inks much the same as any other ink. Pigment black will take a little while longer but no more than normal. HP papers are just formulated to work the best with their inks which is no surprise as it's another way to make money...

Quote:
and it smudges easily when touched.
Well if you touch it while it's still wet then yes... All inkjets output needs to be allowed to dry for a little while as it does soak into the paper or evaporate.

Quote:
As you had access to it, please confirm or deny this fact, because maybe those who said that had faulty printers.
I've had my fair share of problems with HP printers and in truth given the choice I would generally pick a Canon printer for output quality. However the balance is in things like paper capacity, speed of output, cost of consumables, ability to accept a CIS, etc... and the HP comes out much better in that regard.

As I said, I'd avoid the extra tray models because they are a bit hinky and have more problems than standard models and just be prepared to work a little harder to get paper to feed properly. It comes as second nature after a while.

Hope that helps..
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Old May 7, 2008, 11:15 AM   #9
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Thanks for writing back...
Have you tried glossy paper with this printer? any problems?
For plain paper.. how often you experince feeding problems if you keep fanning apart each new stock before introducing it to the tray?
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Old May 7, 2008, 5:44 PM   #10
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mrmknet wrote:
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Thanks for writing back...
Have you tried glossy paper with this printer? any problems?
For plain paper.. how often you experince feeding problems if you keep fanning apart each new stock before introducing it to the tray?
I don't use glossy paper unless it's specifically designed for inkjets as inkjet ink needs an absorbant surface to soak it up otherwise it will indeed smear or fail to dry.

As for plain paper.. I always fan-apart and don't generally have any problems so it's a good habit to get into.

Usually the only hiccups occur when:

- a corner or edge of paper gets bent, etc.. and causes sheets to catch on each other

- a light weight (70 or 80gsm) page has so much ink coverage it gets wet, warped and easily torn. This is especially true when doing automatic duplexing.

These are fairly common in most inkjets though so a little care and fore-thought are generally in order.
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