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Old Oct 9, 2003, 8:50 AM   #11
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Ah yes, quite possibly
I never thought about dark storage in an album. I haven't printed anything smaller that super B size so I never even considered dark storage.
I think not only light affects print life, but also the storage temprature, humidity, and polutants it is exposed to.

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Originally Posted by tedj101
Actually, the 200 year lifespan was for Ultrachrome inks in dark storage and the 100 and less range was generally for display under glass.
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Old Oct 9, 2003, 12:00 PM   #12
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All Epson claimes to lasting hundreds of years is really here say since the ink and printer haven't been around 100 years. You can test all you want but the real world tells a different tail so who cares if the picture fads in 10 to 20 years cause you can always print it again and again a new better printers later down the road.
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Old Oct 9, 2003, 4:02 PM   #13
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IT was on Canon clay-coated photo paper. I have since changed over to Epson, and have had prints made on Kodak paper on the wall for 2 years with no noticeable sign of fading. I agree wholeheartedly about the credibility of Epson's claims of 70yr plus durability, but by comparison to what I had before I can say I'm very pleased with what I've seen so far.
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Old Oct 9, 2003, 7:01 PM   #14
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I agree entirely that the other storage parameters have a huge effect. That's why I said thet album storage was "more like" dark storage rather than saying album storage is dark storage. It obviously isn't since dark storage also controls temperature and humidity and, presumably, most pollutants...

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[quote="PeterP"]Ah yes, quite possibly
I never thought about dark storage in an album. I haven't printed anything smaller that super B size so I never even considered dark storage.
I think not only light affects print life, but also the storage temprature, humidity, and polutants it is exposed to.
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Old Oct 9, 2003, 7:02 PM   #15
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That may be true for you, but it won't be true for me. I won't be around in 20 years -- but I hope my images will be!

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoMenace
All Epson claimes to lasting hundreds of years is really here say since the ink and printer haven't been around 100 years. You can test all you want but the real world tells a different tail so who cares if the picture fads in 10 to 20 years cause you can always print it again and again a new better printers later down the road.
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Old Oct 10, 2003, 2:03 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoMenace
who cares if the picture fads in 10 to 20 years
You can reprint only if you can find the original digital image AND a piece of technology that can still read it. You'll have assiduously to transfer your images to each new storage medium as it comes along.

I have been assisting with my parents-in=laws' memoirs, and they have an excellent photographic record from the 1930s onwards, as prints in albums. It proved quite impossible to find the negatives, even for quite recent images, so I had to scan many prints. These were generally of excellent quality because they were well-fixed photographic images.

I therefore have a passionate interest in non-fading inkjet prints, because I want my grandchildren to have the same pleasure as I get from old photos. Although digital images won't degrade, because of the rapid advance of technology, we're actually getting worse at long-term safe records of the present day.

I sit in a house decorated with my own HP710C inkjet prints up to 4 years old, and only those under glass in dark corners haven't faded. The task of reprinting is daunting and expensive.
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Old Oct 10, 2003, 2:11 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoMenace
All Epson claimes to lasting hundreds of years is really here say since the ink and printer haven't been around 100 years.
The lifetime estimates will be based on accelerated ageing tests with added UV, pollutants, etc. This is standard practice in the paints, coatings, dyestuffs, textiles and many other industries. It's not quite as hit and miss as you may think, because with good experimental technique and the right equipment you can measure the rates of the chemical reactions involved.
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Old Oct 10, 2003, 2:39 AM   #18
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I couldn't have said it better, Alan. I was in a similar position recently when my mother in law turned 75. As part of a surprise party, I got all the old family photographs running back to her birth. Some needed reconstruction which I did by scanning and assiduous work in Photoshop. The piece de resistance was a scan of a tinted version of her high school graduation photo (5X7) which I printed out at 13X19 on Epson Radiant White Water Color Paper, matted and framed. It simply blew her mind (she was a pretty good looker in those days -- something that everyone had forgotten!) I have since filled several requests for copies of that portrait. Because I used the 2200, those portraits will be around for her grandchildrens' 75th birthdays. As you point out, that makes a priceless record for future generations.

I use the 2200 because I soon learned (as you did) that early ink jet prints faded quite quickly. Consequently, I have been a pretty early adopter of products that promised greater permanence.

Best,
<TED>


You can reprint only if you can find the original digital image AND a piece of technology that can still read it. You'll have assiduously to transfer your images to each new storage medium as it comes along.

I have been assisting with my parents-in=laws' memoirs, and they have an excellent photographic record from the 1930s onwards, as prints in albums. It proved quite impossible to find the negatives, even for quite recent images, so I had to scan many prints. These were generally of excellent quality because they were well-fixed photographic images.

I therefore have a passionate interest in non-fading inkjet prints, because I want my grandchildren to have the same pleasure as I get from old photos. Although digital images won't degrade, because of the rapid advance of technology, we're actually getting worse at long-term safe records of the present day.

I sit in a house decorated with my own HP710C inkjet prints up to 4 years old, and only those under glass in dark corners haven't faded. The task of reprinting is daunting and expensive.[/quote]
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Old Oct 10, 2003, 2:45 AM   #19
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This is exactly right. Moreover, this is nothing new. My father owned a laboratory 50 years ago that did, among other things, just that. One of the test beds consisted of a carefully controlled UV source that bomarded the test subject with high levels of UV radiation 24 hours a day. Textiles and paper products were the most common subjects of that testing. (Coats and Clark, the thread producer, was a major client for example.) While we take bright colored synthetic fabrics for granted today, it took a long time to develop that technology. (That was one of the subjects of the research side of my father's businesses.)

Regards,
<TED>

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan T
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoMenace
All Epson claimes to lasting hundreds of years is really here say since the ink and printer haven't been around 100 years.
The lifetime estimates will be based on accelerated ageing tests with added UV, pollutants, etc. This is standard practice in the paints, coatings, dyestuffs, textiles and many other industries. It's not quite as hit and miss as you may think, because with good experimental technique and the right equipment you can measure the rates of the chemical reactions involved.
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Old Oct 10, 2003, 4:06 AM   #20
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Default everything fads

even film fades, i hear the problem with the pigment inks is that not all paper will take them. As for changng storage media, printers will get better as time rolls on so why worry about printing on a printer today that will be put to shame tomorrow. Better to take the time and change media storage when it comes than spend big bucks on printer for it's Longevity claims.
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