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Old Feb 5, 2004, 1:49 PM   #1
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Default Epson Stylus Photo 700

I have an older DeskJet 722C which isn't a bad printer, but isn't a photo quality printer.

A friend just gave me his old printer (Epson Stylus Photo 700), and since I'm new to photo printers, I thought I'd ask for any advice.... anything, really.

What I've figured out or been told is:
Use Epson inks and don't refill. Ok, you *can* get away with it, but I'm not sure I want to try.

Use Epson paper. Produces the best results with their printers. It was suggested I use Matte Paper Heavyweight & Glossy Photo Paper. I've used the matte (and used "photo quality inkjet paper" for the Media and best for quality.. and the results were very nice.) I haven't tried the Glossy yet.

Turn the printer off on the printer, not by a powerstrip.

Let the inks dry. And expect the picture to look different after it has dried compared to just out of the printer.

Any wisdom you can give me (either with this printer or in general)?

Eric
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 10:28 PM   #2
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Eric,

Most of what you said is generally true regardless of the printer make. Especially for older printers. You should always use the printer's power button to turn it off so that the print heads are in the proper position and don't dry out.

The default printer color profiles are usually set using it's brand of papers.

Even though a print may appear to be dry, it can take up to 12 hours to "cure".

One more thing, even the cheap $49 newer printer models will give your old printer a good run for the money. Sort of like the way the digital cameras have improved and become cheaper at the same time. I get lab quality prints using my 10D and Canon i950 printer.

Good luck and happy printing! Bill
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 11:46 PM   #3
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I used the 722 for years and was extremely happy with it. Then the next generation of HP came out, the 860 if I'm remembering correctly at the moment (I still have both but they are at the office). The 860 was much better than the 722. In fact, I hauled out the 722 a few weeks ago and put it back to work; that's when I noticed the difference in quality (especially in graininess).

Since I've been spending some money lately getting things together for a basketball tournament where I will be selling prints, I have been researching printers, and even purchased a larger format HP 1770, I think it was, which I returned promptly when I heard the noise coming from it as well as the way it bit the edges of the paper and the reviews I read (after the fact). Apparently the drivers can't drive very well. To me it's a bit sad how HP has gone downhill over the years. I used to swear by their products but now it's an about face. I have been completely disappointed with everything from that company that I've checked out over the past year. It's shameful.

I purchased a Canon at Christmas which I was quite happy with, and the silence of printing was amazing to me. Then I read about the wide format i9100 Canon, with the 2 photo inks (a total of 6 individual cartridges). Since I've been quite happy with the Canon equipment I've purchased in the past (video, digital still...), I decided that I should take a chance and just buy the i9100. Well, I received it a few days ago, printed out a number of 19 inch wide formats, and couldn't believe the quality before my eyes. I'm not a beginner when it comes to determining quality resolution in both video and photography, since I've been teaching it for 10 years plus. Yes, I'm new to "digital cameras" but not to digital manipulation of images either scanned or other. I just didn't take the photographs myself, which I now do. The reviews claimed that this printer was able to provide quality that superceded studio prints.

I wasn't disappointed.

Spend a few dollars more and get the i9100 Canon.
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 11:47 PM   #4
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The point about the color profiles and the paper is a good one. Hadn't thought about it.

12 hours? I was told around 8'ish... I'll leave them out a bit longer then.

Ya, this printer is about, what 5-6 year old? So I guess it isn't too surprising that things have gotten better. For $49 is a bit of a surprise, but also good to hear. I don't expect this printer to work forever, and eventually I'll probably want something that prints larger than 8 1/2x11. So I bet I can expect to match/beat this quality in the larger prints too (accepting that the image can go that large.)

Eric
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 11:57 PM   #5
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Eric...
go out immediately and buy the i9100, then come back, after you have printed out your first 19 inch sample, and thank me for directing you properly.
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Old Feb 8, 2004, 7:54 AM   #6
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Eric,

The complete drying time depends on the paper. Eight hours should be fine for most.

I agree with Normcar, but I I'm very baised towards Canon printers. I used to be an HP man. But HP fell behind in the photo race. However, some of their more recent products produce excellent photos. This is espeically true of grayscale prints.

If you are printing mostly color and if speed and borderless printing is important, the i9100 will be hard to beat. I have a S9000 (earlier wide format version) and it produces stunning 13 by 19 photos in 5 minutes. One word of caution. I've heard rumors that Canon was planning to come out with several new printer models to answer the most recent challenges from Epson and HP.

Any of the "Big Three's" high-end photo printer's will produce excellent results. I've been lucky and satisfied with Canon's printers except for grayscale prints.

Bill
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Old Feb 8, 2004, 6:35 PM   #7
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I too made the switch from an HP to Canon. Iím at work right now so I canít quite remember which Canon I purchased as it is a year and a couple of months old now. The HP printed well and printed the same pretty much on whatever paper I fed it.

My Canon is very finicky and so far I have only had positive results with Canon brand paper and some generic card stock. The main reason I converted was to update technology so that I can print borderless prints and take advantage of the SIX individual ink tanks. They have added a photo cyan and magenta to compliment the standard cyan, yellow, magenta and black.

Excellent results is all I can say. I hear the new generation Canons are even better. The cheapo printers at $49 give great prints however you sacrifice a tremendous amount of speed and I believe the consumables are more expensive.
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Old Feb 8, 2004, 6:50 PM   #8
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PK,

Try using Pictorico Paper. The Photo Gallery is even smoother than Canon's photo paper pro, without the smell. Pictorico provides color profiles for Epson and Canon printers. I found the cost to be a bit cheaper than Photo Paper pro. I really like the silk and canvas papers from Pictorico. Give it a try.

Bill
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Old Feb 8, 2004, 8:17 PM   #9
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Thanks for the tip I appreciate it. Where can this paper be found? So far I am really happy with the photo paper pro, so if it is as good or better I know I'll like it.

Seeing your signature block again, I just remembered I have the S900. Little bro to the 9000
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Old Feb 8, 2004, 10:02 PM   #10
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It's interesting that people are commending that Canon model.

I've got a semi-pro photography friend who is a die-hard Epson person. But when talking to him this past week he said that Canon finally caught up with Epson. I wonder if he meant that model.

Does the i9100 support archival inks? How much does it drop the quality of the print?

Eric
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