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Old Feb 24, 2005, 12:52 AM   #231
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arklab wrote:
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Paul_D wrote:
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If the printer power supply is 220-240V and you are on 110V, you will need more than just a plug converter, you will need something that is also a 110V to 220V voltage transformer. That would be the 1st thing to check.
No, you don't.

When several people have been running Expansys UK Pixmas (3000, 4000, and 5000's) with the the plug adaptor for weeks and months WITH NO PROBLEM is a subtle hint that the plug adaptor (and the 110v it passes through) WORKS.

Theory is fine until it runs into fact. :blah:




Not a flame, I just don't want someone having a problem misdirected by the uninformed. :bye:
That is precisely why I asked what was marked on pagej's power supply and the answer was 220-240V. That is NOT a universal powersupply capable of accepting 110V to 240V. Canon may supply some printers with such a supply and you may have got one but it is YOU who are assuming that all of the UK models have a 110V-240V supply. Have you even looked at the markings on your own printer? Locally it is a requirement for the input voltage range and maximum load current to be marked on all electrical equipment.
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Old Feb 24, 2005, 2:08 PM   #232
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That is precisely why I asked what was marked on pagej's power supply and the answer was 220-240V. That is NOT a universal powersupply capable of accepting 110V to 240V. Canon may supply some printers with such a supply and you may have got one but it is YOU who are assuming that all of the UK models have a 110V-240V supply. Have you even looked at the markings on your own printer? Locally it is a requirement for the input voltage range and maximum load current to be marked on all electrical equipment.



There was once a farmer who went to a circus for the first time in his life.

There he went into a tent containing an elephant.

When he exited the tent a reporter for the local newspaper asked him what he thought of this new experience.

He replied "You can't fool me. There aint no such animal" :-)





I stand by my previous reply.
Sorry, it's still true.

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Old Feb 24, 2005, 2:56 PM   #233
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arklab, I'm not trying to provoke an argument here.
From http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/....htm#smpssb12i
regarding running power supplies on higher input voltages
"Going the other way may be more realistic if (and this is a big if) you will not be running at anywhere near full capacity. Many switchmode power supplies will run on much lower than their rated input voltage. However, regulation may be poor and the switchmode transistor will need to be passing much higher current to maintain the same power output. To maintain specifications could require extensive changes to the circuitry and replacement of the switchmode transistor and possibly transformer and other parts as well. Again, I do not recommend this.

Use a small stepup or stepdown transformer instead. The only exceptions are:

* If there are clearly marked jumpers to select the input voltage.

* You can reverse engineer enough of the input circuitry to add/remove the needed connection with confidence.

CAUTION: As they say in wood-working: "Measure twice, cut once". Make sure you are dealing with the correct jumper AND you are going the right way (increasing or decreasing as needed). If the manufacturer didn't include this feature, there may be a good reason!

* The supply is clearly marked as being autoswitching or having universal power input. "

If Canon haven't clearly marked the powersupply as the last point above, it may work but out of specification. If it was my printer and it was only marked 220-240V, that's what I'd feed it. If Canon designed power supply to be universal why wouldn't they mark it accordingly? You still haven't reported what markings you have.
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Old Feb 24, 2005, 5:30 PM   #234
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I spoke with expansys. They tried a US charger on on of the defectives that another customer sent in-and they concluded that the 5000 units need more power than we can give them via us power.

He said the 4000's are fine.

BTW what is a US charger?



So has anyone here gotten a 5000 to work in the US? What does your power supply say?

How about the 4000 what does the power supply say?



Thanks

Jon


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Old Feb 24, 2005, 7:36 PM   #235
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pagej may have come up with the answer. I have a UK 4000 & purchased a stepup stepdown converter for it. The printer cost $180 & I was not about to risk flaming it for lack of a proper $20 supply. I too would like to get rid of the larger converter & go to just a power chord, but not until I know it is safe to do so. I have just today sent a msg to canon techsupport for an answer to this. Hopefully I will receive a concise & informative reply in a few days or so. Will post when received.
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Old Feb 24, 2005, 7:46 PM   #236
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Hope this helps:

I've downloaded Canon service manuals for some of their other recent models in the past, and on each, the country was a programmable option.The ip-series uses the same method. Having a cd tray or equivalent helps, but half the work is simple reprogramming.

The procedure basically involve holding down the resume button while powering up, then pressing the power button twice to put the printer into a programming mode, after which the buttona areused to step through a series of options to set themodel/destination country and reset the page counter. The indicator light alternatesfrom green to orange as you step through the options.


I found this thread, wich gives the procedure, and tells how to defeat the door open warning with aregistry key change:

http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?t=113465

The reprogramming and registry change are detailled toward the bottom of the page. If someone with a UK "model could do the EPROM information printout proocedure, we could probably identify the destination code to use.
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Old Feb 24, 2005, 8:12 PM   #237
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vandyo wrote:
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pagej may have come up with the answer. I have a UK 4000 & purchased a stepup stepdown converter for it. The printer cost $180 & I was not about to risk flaming it for lack of a proper $20 supply. I too would like to get rid of the larger converter & go to just a power chord, but not until I know it is safe to do so. I have just today sent a msg to canon techsupport for an answer to this. Hopefully I will receive a concise & informative reply in a few days or so. Will post when received.
Don't you mean a "Step UP" converter (Transformer), converting USA 110/120V to European 220/240V?

Something like you would find here: http://www.voltage-converter-transfo...mer.html#vt500

If I had an Expansys European Canon iP3000/4000/5000, I would seriously look at something like this to ensure long term operation.

Whoops! Just re-read your post, you did say "Step Up/Step Down.....My apologies

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Old Feb 25, 2005, 1:53 PM   #238
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arklab, I'm not trying to provoke an argument here.
Nor me!
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regarding running power supplies on higher input voltages

US voltage is LOWERthan UK, not higher. (110v US vs. 220v UK)

Here you are actually UNDERVOLTING the UK printer, yet it works fine.

I suppose the only thing that will settle this for those who just can't believe this can work is for someone with a UK printer (any model should do) to remove the UK power supply from the printer, plug it into US wall current (via US power cord or plug converter on UK cord) then measure voltage at the three access pins which feed the printer electronics.

After all, thats what really counts - agreeded?
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Old Feb 25, 2005, 1:57 PM   #239
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pscanonwrote:


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I've downloaded Canon service manuals for some of their other recent models in the past, and on each, the country was a programmable option.The ip-series uses the same method.
This is great.

Can you give us the URL for the download?

Thanks
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Old Feb 25, 2005, 3:54 PM   #240
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arklab wrote:
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US voltage is LOWER than UK, not higher. (110v US vs. 220v UK)

Here you are actually UNDERVOLTING the UK printer, yet it works fine.

I suppose the only thing that will settle this for those who just can't believe this can work is for someone with a UK printer (any model should do) to remove the UK power supply from the printer, plug it into US wall current (via US power cord or plug converter on UK cord) then measure voltage at the three access pins which feed the printer electronics.

After all, thats what really counts - agreeded?
The section of the article that I quoted was dealing with undervolting.
The problem is that you still need the same power to drive the printer. If you have a lower input Voltage the current must increase. If the power supply will even run with 110 instead of 220V the current in the input must double to maintain the same output.The input stage of your power supply could be running hotter than normal for this reason. In the US 110V house wiring is heavier gauge to carry this current.
On no load you may still get the correct extra low voltage outputs(on my i865 looks like 24V + 27V) but the real question is whether the output voltage is still correct at the highest load current. I suspect that some models(like yours) will run after a fashion but the 220-240V power supplies may not deliver their normal output current if the input is only 110V. You would have to connect the power supply to the printer in a way that allowed you to access the wiring and see how much the output Voltage dropped with different loads.
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