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Old Apr 19, 2005, 6:08 AM   #21
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Hi,

Last week I bought a Epson R800 in a local store.
The first photo produced light banding, almost unoticable.
The next few were ok. Then I got a photo that only printed half of the image with heavy banding. This was produced on Epson premium glossy paper that came with the printer.
After 5 days with mixed results I decided to bring the printer back and got a refund.
I had been researching the Canon Pixma 8500 but i could not sourse one locally so I settled for the Pixma IP6000.
The results were staggerng compared to the Epson. I mprinted the same images as I had done on the Epson Rs800 and the images just jumped off the page. The RS800 were flat and dull compared to the IP6000. Th IP6000's showed much more detail better colors and very vivid. The software was much better than the RS800 and the printing speed was fine for me.
If these are the results I got image what you would get from the IP8500.
I would not touch an Epson again.

I hope this experience helps you make a decision.


Regards,


John:sad:
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Old Apr 22, 2005, 6:56 PM   #22
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I challenge anyone to use both printers if they can on there home computer or at least an enviroment where they aren't all mucked up in the store. Nobody would even consider the Epson if they did the same print on the Canon.

Epson users try the canon you'll be blown away. Especially if you use Mac OS X the software and drivers are superior to epson's in every way.

Printing on a DVD/CD is to me stupid. First it's hard on the printers, and printhead, and second despite every precaution inthe world the ink gets stick on the dvd. Leave it in your car, or put it in cool storage for a year and you'll notice the ink is funny. I'd rather just print on a label. It's not a really big deal anyway. Especailly on Epson with the durabright inks using the cd print just kills the printhead and dooms it to a slow death.
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Old May 6, 2005, 2:36 AM   #23
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Hmm.....are you a Canon rep? Sorry, but I work at a computer retail store, and we run samples on all the inkjets, and just like a lot of professional reviews have indicated, the IP8500 is not a good choice. The prints are far too red, as you can read Vincent Oliver's detailed review, and Canon's fade resistance is atrocious. The prints we've done in the store have faded only after a few weeks. From the standpoint of punchy colors, the IP8500 does well, but the prints are far too cartoonish and don't give neutral results like the R800 and also the HP 8450, bot of which offer far superior fade resistance. And your assertion that Epson users will be blown away is a joke.....Epson is widely used in the professional market, while Canon is only just beginning to consider using pigment inks. Read up on their new imagePROGRAF W6200.
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Old May 26, 2005, 5:18 PM   #24
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erichlund wrote:

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I have the R800. Nice printer, but unless someone knows the secret, you can't hook it up to a print server.
JB Wrote:
Hook it up to a Hewlett Packard Jet-Direct box if you really want to share it from a server.


I have a different brand of Print Server (Axiom). It works fine with my HP Deskjet 1220C. I contacted Epson and they specifically replied that the printer doesn't support use on a print server. It can be "shared", but that's different from the small print server devices, and requires that the sharing computer be "on".

Cheers, Eric
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Old Jun 22, 2005, 2:08 AM   #25
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:blah:Canon is simply the best. The head do not clog anymore. Even if they did, they are removable and you can clean them. The droplet size is smaller and more consistent, 2pl at 4800x2400 dpi. 8 Colors, all seperate. NOT 6 on the Epson R800 and R1800, that's right, I did say 6. Count them out, the two blacks do not fire at the same time, anda gloss optimizer is NOT a color! LOL Speed without cutting down on quality. And guess what, for all the Epson people that RIP on Canon for only having prints that last about 40 years or so, HERE comes the Canon Chroma-Life100 BCI-7 series INK, with 100 HUNDRED year Archival Qality. Current Pixma printers will just need a firmware update this fall! There's NO stoppin Canon now!


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Old Oct 17, 2005, 8:45 PM   #26
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I just wanted to now mention that if you work at a computer retail store, as I do, and you have a magazine section, check out the Sept. issue of PC Magainze, whereas their Annual Customer Satisfcation and Reliability survery, puts CANON number ONE is EVERY category, above Epson and putting HP out of the number one spot after 13 years in a row. Canon now dominates and 9 out of 10 owners of Canon recommend Canon. Having the highest market share and selling more digital cameras than any other brand, their photo, inkjet, AIO, SFP and business machines are ranked higher, even for printers over a year old, are now rated highest for customer satisfaction and reliability. Perhaps you don't regard PC Magazine with any regard, but it is a reptuable magazine and that survey is just that, rated by CUSTOMERS. Go figure. Also, everyone needs to check out the PIXMA II second generation printers with the CLI-8 series inks that do NOT produce any color cast on B&W and have up to 100 year fade resistence, ONE pico-litre droplet and 9600x2400 DPI printing. Tell me who else can lay down one-picolitre drolets and output at 9600x2400 dpi? We print samples in the store too, 36 seconds on the Canon IP6600d and we charged out 2 packs of the 120 ct 4"x6" paper, and put a memory card in the machine with 5 different 4MP images and got 186 4"x6" prints before ONE ink cartridge was depleted, ONLY ONE! Who else produces that many prints before reporting to replace just ONE ink?


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Old Oct 17, 2005, 9:29 PM   #27
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iSAPS Guy wrote:
Quote:
:blah:Canon is simply the best. The head do not clog anymore. Even if they did, they are removable and you can clean them. The droplet size is smaller and more consistent, 2pl at 4800x2400 dpi. 8 Colors, all seperate. NOT 6 on the Epson R800 and R1800, that's right, I did say 6. Count them out, the two blacks do not fire at the same time, anda gloss optimizer is NOT a color! LOL Speed without cutting down on quality. And guess what, for all the Epson people that RIP on Canon for only having prints that last about 40 years or so, HERE comes the Canon Chroma-Life100 BCI-7 series INK, with 100 HUNDRED year Archival Qality. Current Pixma printers will just need a firmware update this fall! There's NO stoppin Canon now!


To correct you, both the R800 and R1800 have a picoliter size of 1.5 at 5760x1440 dpi. They both use pigment based inks. One black is for glossy paper and the other is for matte papers. With glossy papers, 7 inks are used; with matte papers, 6 inks are used (no gloss optimizer). BTW, the "glass optimizer" is used to reduce the gloss differential on glossy/semi-glossy papers.



Besides the direct printing on printable CDs/DVDs, both printers support roll paper for a maximum printable area of 13x44 inches (for panoramics).



Also, from the Canon website: "(ChromaLife 100) results based on accelerated testing by Canon..." The results have NOT been independently verified.

www.wilhelm-research.com shows much better results for HP, Epson and Lexmark.
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Old Oct 17, 2005, 10:01 PM   #28
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JPL wrote:
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To correct you, both the R800 and R1800 have a picoliter size of 1.5 at 5760x1440 dpi. They both use pigment based inks. One black is for glossy paper and the other is for matte papers. With glossy papers, 7 inks are used; with matte papers, 6 inks are used (no gloss optimizer). BTW, the "glass optimizer" is used to reduce the gloss differential on glossy/semi-glossy papers.



Besides the direct printing on printable CDs/DVDs, both printers support roll paper for a maximum printable area of 13x44 inches (for panoramics).



Also, from the Canon website: "(ChromaLife 100) results based on accelerated testing by Canon..." The results have NOT been independently verified.

http://www.wilhelm-research.com shows much better results for HP, Epson and Lexmark.
And also to quote canon the numbers are IIRC
100 in an a plastic sleave in an album
30 years under glass
10 years if exposed to air

This is using their premium paper.. pr-101 I believe.


http://www.wilhelm-research.com/epso...2005_06_18.pdf
http://www.wilhelm-research.com/hp/8450.html
http://www.wilhelm-research.com/epso...2004_12_03.pdf

Even the Epson r320 in dark storage is rated at over 100 years by Wilhelm Research, which also do 44inch according to the specs.

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