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Old Dec 22, 2004, 10:01 AM   #1
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I'm trying to figure out why people are concerned about the durability of inks. I say just reprint and get over it. If your a pro and selling the printed images I can't imagine that you'd be using inkjet technology anyway.

whats your opinion.

thanks

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Old Dec 22, 2004, 12:36 PM   #2
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I'll try to answer that with, we are, and we are, and a lot do :-)

Guess what images sold as Giclee prints are, just very expensive inkjet prints.
Pros and studios who want to print short run editions, or on demand prints and have total control over the output do. That Epson 4000p is just wonderful for that.

As do a lot of event shooters who with the magic new wireless technologies available in cameras now can have the prints ready for sale before the event is over, and the potential buyers enthusiasm starts to wane. Fast Dye Subs do great here.

Pros and others who want a much longer print display life than traditional chemical based prints do.

The old Ilfochrom, and standard pro chemical processes like Kodak Royal have a display life of maybe 28years.
Most consumer prints are much shorter lived maybe 10-20 years.
The one exception is places properly printing to Fuji Crystal Archive which has a display life of over 60years.

Some well done pigment base inkjets on acid free archival papers can hit upward of 200 years. (supposedly, I'll have to come back and see).

I can have 48 inch wide print made on the 9600 and the cost per foot is reasonable.
Try having that size printed on traditional chemical media and see what the costs are.

For homebodies not doing sales that is not so important and a reprint can always be made if the original file is still around and can be found.





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Old Dec 22, 2004, 1:08 PM   #3
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I'm thinking that by the time the ink fades technology will be completely different! So for a pro yes if they need to hand somebody a print then inkjet with good archival ink or dye sub is the way to go. But I'd think for the average home hobbyist its kinda of not worth worrying about. anyway thanks for the input.

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Old Dec 22, 2004, 1:20 PM   #4
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Yes, actually I was agreeing with you:-) all the stuff is changeing to fast right now.

All the Best

Peter.
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Old Dec 22, 2004, 1:23 PM   #5
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cool, thanks for your input!

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Old Dec 22, 2004, 1:24 PM   #6
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Even for people that don't sell their photos longevity of the print can be important.

Do you ever take family photos, print them, and then give them away as gifts to sons or daughters, brothers or sisters, cousins, etc? These photos become part of your family history and there is no guarantee that if in 20-30 years the prints have faded too badly that you'll be around to reprint them or if the original digital files will even still be around or there is anyone in your family that would even know how to process them for reprinting! The historical record of your family can be invaluable to a future member of your extended family. I wish I had more of a photographic record of my family.

So, yes, archival quality for personal use can still be a valuable thing. I'm not quite there as I print with a Canon i9900 with its dye inks, but one day...
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Old Dec 22, 2004, 1:41 PM   #7
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Geoffs, I believe( I don't have a Canon printer) that they claim upwards of 75years on the "right" paper and especially if top coated with a protectorant. Not to shabby for a dye based process.

Just remember to come back in about 75 years and complain if it has faded :blah:
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Old Dec 22, 2004, 2:04 PM   #8
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Hi Peter - I'm not too anxious to use a protectorant coating. I've seen the results of using them and they change the surface quality enough so that it is not pleasing to me. However, for pictures just given to family members I don't find that to be a problem. For pictures I might sell to non-family members, it's a different story and, other than an Epson with its pigment inks, I don't yet have a solution for that situation.

Now, if the new Canon bci7 archival dye inks come out and can be used in an i9900, that would be very good and a possibly decent solution!
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Old Dec 22, 2004, 2:10 PM   #9
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My post, which I think this post is slightly referring to, was meant to be much along the lines of Geoff's reply above. I might have all my images on disc in 40 years from now, but I'm going to be giving many pictures away to friends, family, and other people I might eventually fall out of touch with.

That said, is it safe to continue looking into the Canon6000D or should I start looking at the HiTi's?

Thanks guys
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Old Dec 22, 2004, 2:30 PM   #10
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basically I've been wondering the same thing but I think I've moved on to the olympus p440! On ebay you can get them for less then 300 dollars. the hiti's are very nice, wish they'd do a 5x7 or 8x10! thanks

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