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Old Oct 17, 2005, 9:32 PM   #21
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I'm not sure what that has to do with the number of prints we got before running out of one tank, but hey...what most customers tell me, between 30 to 100 years, "I'll be dead by then anyway", and most professionals now agree that in the digital age, preserving the "digital image file", and being able to repint it, even at the minimum of 30 years (as far better results can even be achieved under glass behind a UV filter), is more important now than having a print last 200 years on the wall. The technologies that will be around to print images will probably be far better than they are now, and again, having the digital image preserved makes it MORE possible that generations from now, the same print can be viewed (and preserved). I'm also referencing an article right now that shows the Canon i9900 printer producing a higher color gamut over the NEW Epson R1800 and 2400 printers (and this is Pro Epson Article). We've seem prints with the new K3 pigment inks and if you don't get the profile correct, you get a washed out, faded looking print, oh but wait, it lasts on the wall for 200 years. I'd rather look at an image with the most accurate color reproduction, using Exif 2.2 from camera to printer precision rather than faded pigment results off the batt.
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Old Oct 17, 2005, 9:48 PM   #22
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I have used and worked closely with Canon people for almost 6 years. Canon, using those seperate, clear-see through ink cartridges cost the LEAST when compared to Epson and HP. Epson's chip and HP chip on their catridge reports that the cartridges are empty when they're really not and rendering the cartridges "dead" until a new one is inserted. An then there's HP with tri-color inks, making you waste and throw away two colors when just one is really out. Also, using a Canon 6 color printer, I've consistently got between 150-200 4"x6" prints at 4MP before just replacing ONE, yes ONE cartridge! Now how is that for cost? It's amazing.
While it's true the canon ink-tanks are still clear, they do have chips onboard. Based on what i've read by others, they report being empty three times before giving you the choice to continue printing and disabling the meter. But if that was not the case you would either waste ink or paper depending on whether you print till empty or chuck when reported empty.

It's hard for me to say whether or not the canon system is more cost effective than the HP system. It seems that the HP #97 (is rated at a 450p@15% yield where the Canon bci-6 is rated at 280p, priced about the same for three colors. While it's true you waste ink throwing away a #97, you also waste ink each time you replace one cartridge.

But all of this is accidemic because the new HP printers, i.e. the 8250, 3210, 3310 use individual tanks with a closed loop system that helps to eliminate waste.




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Old Oct 17, 2005, 10:26 PM   #23
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I'm not sure what that has to do with the number of prints we got before running out of one tank, but hey...what most customers tell me, between 30 to 100 years, "I'll be dead by then anyway", and most professionals now agree that in the digital age, preserving the "digital image file", and being able to repint it, even at the minimum of 30 years (as far better results can even be achieved under glass behind a UV filter), is more important now than having a print last 200 years on the wall. The technologies that will be around to print images will probably be far better than they are now, and again, having the digital image preserved makes it MORE possible that generations from now, the same print can be viewed (and preserved). I'm also referencing an article right now that shows the Canon i9900 printer producing a higher color gamut over the NEW Epson R1800 and 2400 printers (and this is Pro Epson Article). We've seem prints with the new K3 pigment inks and if you don't get the profile correct, you get a washed out, faded looking print, oh but wait, it lasts on the wall for 200 years. I'd rather look at an image with the most accurate color reproduction, using Exif 2.2 from camera to printer precision rather than faded pigment results off the batt.

I was following up on your own discussion/statement about ChromaLife.

I don't understand why anyone wouldnot try to"get the profile correct". You may not get it correct the first time but you would continue to try.

All Epson photo printers also support EXIF2.2 as well as Print Image Matching (PIM).

BTW, Canon also uses profiles for their Professional Photo Paper. What happens if "you don't get the (Canon) profile correct"?
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Old Oct 17, 2005, 10:37 PM   #24
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The guy at Staples is wrong. I have a new iP4200 and I can already tell I'm getting better mileage than that. I've already printed about 35 disks (CD's and DVD's) and 27 DVD jackets and my lowest tank is at 50%. DVD jackets ar about 7.15x10.75. I printed all of these at the highest quality also. Speaking of quality, it's amazing. :-)
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Old Oct 18, 2005, 4:21 AM   #25
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JPL wrote:
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iSAPS Guy wrote:
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I'm not sure what that has to do with the number of prints we got before running out of one tank, but hey...what most customers tell me, between 30 to 100 years, "I'll be dead by then anyway", and most professionals now agree that in the digital age, preserving the "digital image file", and being able to repint it, even at the minimum of 30 years (as far better results can even be achieved under glass behind a UV filter), is more important now than having a print last 200 years on the wall. The technologies that will be around to print images will probably be far better than they are now, and again, having the digital image preserved makes it MORE possible that generations from now, the same print can be viewed (and preserved). I'm also referencing an article right now that shows the Canon i9900 printer producing a higher color gamut over the NEW Epson R1800 and 2400 printers (and this is Pro Epson Article). We've seem prints with the new K3 pigment inks and if you don't get the profile correct, you get a washed out, faded looking print, oh but wait, it lasts on the wall for 200 years. I'd rather look at an image with the most accurate color reproduction, using Exif 2.2 from camera to printer precision rather than faded pigment results off the batt.

I was following up on your own discussion/statement about ChromaLife.

I don't understand why anyone wouldnot try to"get the profile correct". You may not get it correct the first time but you would continue to try.

All Epson photo printers also support EXIF2.2 as well as Print Image Matching (PIM).

BTW, Canon also uses profiles for their Professional Photo Paper. What happens if "you don't get the (Canon) profile correct"?

First of all, the CHIP on the Canon cartridge prevents a customer from putting the wrong cartridges in the wrong slots. Even though the wrong cartridge can slip in and snap in another color slot, once a user closes the lid, the alarm indicator light will flash and alert the customer that ink cartridges are put in wrong. Surely If you have a Canon that uses those new, large LCD TFT screens, this hows the exacttwo or three or so, that is put in wrong. Of course,this was also made to prevent refilling. For example printing a picture of a child with a yellow shirt on, standing next to a yellow school bus would render a total different shaing scheme it someone had refilled heir cartridge with "someone elses yellow, and then compared this to the print they first made using the Canon Genuine inks.If you want your print head ruined or "gummed" up, this can also be a possible result of using another manufactures ink brand. Just like oil in a car, printer ink has various chemical makeups that involve viscosity and must react when heated in order to "seal" un the paper as the ink is layed down across the paper. Upon opening the lid as well, the incorrectly placed cartridges blink. Next, the optical monitoring system on the Canon cartridges (hold the yellow, for example up to the light and see the notch (prism), carved into the cartridge; this allows for the machine to use that and a drop count method to calculate the amount of ink in the printer. Along with that, it also calculates the amount of ink needed for the amount of printing set forth by the user. If the Canon printer does NOT have enough ink to finish, let say, 10 pictures, it will STOP after completing the last entire photo it can complete, then the LED or LEDS will flash to indicate what cartridge needs to be changed (a picture on the computer screen will also show which one needs to be replaced).

HP: As for HP, this new version, based off of Canon's Photolithography Nozzle inkjet engineering printing process, is NOT 5 years ahead of everyone else. In fact, Canon started this process, now called "FINE", in 1998, by producing a print head that is manufactured with a silicon-like process, similar like processor and memory chips are built. What HP does NOT boast right now, with this new system (and why it's ONLY on two models), is their ink droplet size. Called a "pico-litre". Canon lays down 1 (ONE) PicoLitre droplets at 9600x2400 dpi. HP does not even publish their droplet size, when in fact engineering manuals indicate HP lays down a 5PL droplet on these models, and a varying droplet size on previous model of 5-8 picolitre droplets. Epson currently lays down 3 picolitre droplets on most models with 1.5 picolitre droplets on the Epson R1800 (3PL on the R2400). Also, EVER heard of something called "Contrast Plus"? Well, No other printer company makes a printer for being a photo printer and a Work Horse for text. Translation - The machine (IP4200, 5200), have the single CLI-8 Black cartridge for graphics and photos - this way, it doesn't have to draw upon the colors to make what's called, "composite black". With this Canon CLI-8 black you don't even need any other black cartridges for B&W printing. The ones we've printed in the store, are the new shots from Canon's web site, black and whites from some of their higher end digitial cameras come out beautiful, without ANY color cast of ANY color. They're simply Black and White. As as you may have read, this new CLI-8 black having a higher optical density (being able to produce a wider color gamut), affects every image on the whole, as this helps to create pictures with a almost 3-dimentional look and fell.

NEXT, lets talk about those HP Individual cartrdiges. HAVE YOU READ THE BACK OF THE BOX on those inks? HOW MUCH INK is in those cartridges? HP is wanting $10.99 for EACH cartridge, when in-fact EACH cartridge has different amounts of ink in the cartridge. The Magenta has 3.5Milliters of ink in it, one other has 5ML of ink in it and one has 6ML of ink in it. ALL of the Canon ink cartridges have 13ML of ink in them and cost the SAME price. Now what sounds more fair and what sounds like a gimmick? Also, has anyone read PC Magazine and HOW HP actually produces their "Worlds Fastest Photo Print"??? It's in DRAFT mode, being set to a lower quality setting that the "DEFAULT" mode that the print comes on with when plugged in, AND GET THIS, it's set to a BORDERED print, YUP, NOT BORDERLESS (and with NO enhancements done, no red eye, ect). The Canon printer has the HIGHEST quality and Fastest Photo Print, RIGHT out the box on DEFAULT mode (2400dpi default mode on the IP6600d, having 3072 print nozzles putting out a borderless photo in about 46 seconds. it's also interesting to note that while HPis claiming to the world that they're 5 years ahead of everyone else becase of their version of Canon's FINE technology and Full-Photo Lithography Nozzle Inkjet Engineering. When in-fact Canon started with "Advanced Microfine Droplet Inkjet Nozzle Engineering a LONG time ago, first produced using on the Canon S600 individual ink tank printer. This was sprig of 1989. Canon employs their own, patented semi-conudctor process for their printhead, made similiar to how memory and computer pentium processory are made today, With microscopic laser channels etched in for the ink to flow along to the ejection tips with have a micro-heater just above the point at which the ink is ejected.

NOW, lets STEP BACK, with that HP95 and HP97 color cartridge. HAVE YOU LOOKED at the Ink Quantity Listed on the side of the box. WHO would pay around $26 dollars for a tri-color ink from HP with three colors in it, TOTALLING 7, yes count that, S E V E N ML of ink, divide that up into three colors and you're paying $26 dollars for SEVEN (7), ML of ink? I suppose if someone is independently RICH, this would not be an issue. That is roughly 2.3 ML of each color. OMG, and if you run out of one color, like how many people print vacation picture with a lot of blue (from the sky), for example, THEN you Throw AWAY the whole cartridge, and what was left of Magenta and Yellow, just to get more Cyan, ANOTHER $26 dollars! WOW!

It's idiot proof NOT to get the profile right with Canon. Using the, Photo Record software for example, the drop-down menu asks you to choose what Canon paper you have loaded in the machine. The R1800 and 2400 do not even so much as have a PictBridge port on the machine for direct printing. Now I understand the response will be that ALL professionals will dotheir editing using the software, but MAN withsome of the awesome cameras out today, like the Rebel, 20D,EOS 5D and so on...it's Not hard to take a great shot and get it right the first time. Now while HP puts cardslots on their wide format consumer line modelin the store, I believe that is a little over board. Since Pictbridge is now an accepted industry wide, standard for direct camera to printer printing and allows you the same freedom of the printer with the LCD screen and cropping options, those two Epson's should have at least had that.

As for the CD/DVD printing. It's easy. First let me say that it's a licensing issue, the patent, for the CD/DVD printing is actually owned by Philips and every time Epson sells a printer, they're paying a royalty for that. Canon prints on CD/DVD in all of the Europeans countries, along with Asia and Australia and South America (just not in North America, Canada and Mexico). Since the printers themselves come off of the assembly line in that exact SAME manner, it's quite easy to reconfigure ALL the of Canon printers and AIO units to print on CD/DVD. I have done this to my MP780 by using the directions given to me from contributing to and reading off of this forum. Guess what? it prints them faster and are instantly dry in about 36 seconds (little longer for a blank DVD and a little longer using the silver reflective coated surface CD/DVD's. Actually I found this on here. It has been condensed into a few easy steps. When I locate one, I'll scan it on here and show everyone, it's soo cool. The software is available from Canon in the UK site, (so you can have an English version, it's a download - FREE), you can buy the tray on E-Bay for about $5 and reconfigure the machine with a registry change; lastly remove the little plastic piece that blocks the tray from going in to the machine. The software is called CD-R Print. Here is the web site for converting your machine to print on CD/DVD's. It's even easier if you have an AIO, because you have a screen to look at

http://pixma.webpal.info/Pixma345/345.html

The site is in the process of being updated for the Next or Second Generation PIXMA.

Please SEE ALL ATTACHED SHEETS.


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Old Oct 18, 2005, 4:24 AM   #26
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Old Oct 18, 2005, 4:24 AM   #27
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Two more to go:

:blah:
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Old Oct 18, 2005, 4:25 AM   #28
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One more to SEAL the Deal! :|
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Old Oct 18, 2005, 4:45 AM   #29
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I believe I forgot one last FULL point to make. I'm referring to the PC Magazine, September Issue - Talking about the 18th Annual Customer Satisfaction Survey. Also, this referring to satisfaction AND Reliability!

YOU GUESSED IT, - AFTER 13 YEARS IN A ROW, C A N O N :| ROCKS

HP out of the number ONE spot to take over! Canon now has the number one spot for customer service and reliability in EACH AND EVERY SINGLE CATEGORY! Interesting enough, Epson beats out HP in many of the same categories. Also, some may say that this article is "bought" or paid for by the advertiser that gets the "glowing" review, however in this case, let's remember that this is a CUSTOMER satisfaction survery. 9 out of 10 Canon owners recommend canon.

Here is a little except, and THEN the entire article. READ and ENJOY FOLKS! then, take the next two steps, Buy Canon Stock and e-mail me with any hints and new stuff.



:blah:"CANON was the only brand to record an "Excellent" rating in any category!" Canon was the only brand to be recommended by 9 out of 10 readers. Canon printers earned the highest score in each of the following categories:"




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Old Oct 18, 2005, 4:51 AM   #30
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:| CANON SAY C H E E S E U R # 1!


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