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Old Oct 3, 2005, 5:10 AM   #11
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zakezuke wrote:
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KnightCrawler wrote:
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If your a professional or just serious about your photos you can buy super high grade DVD+R's that havelike a100 year guarantee. They cost quite a bit more then standard grade media but you can't put a price on memories. :-)

I would still make backup copies myself though and store it in a proper place.
I thought it was a good idea back in the 90s to back up my stuff on QIC 125meg tape. Decent archival standard. Rugged design. Pretty sure my data is still intact on those suckers but... in order to access them I'm dependent on a legacy PC with ISA slots to take my propriority controler, as well as the propriority dos software that same with it. Well my PC dos discs are toast, as are the discs with the propriority software. Not like I didn't make backups, I had many backups as I wanted to ditch the 5.25 inch drive. So I have QIC paperweights.

Not a bad idea... though i've not seen any independent testing on the 100yr DVD media. But are we still going to be using DVD in 100yrs? It's been nice so far the fact that DVD units read legacy CD media, and the fact that both + and - R are supported on most units. But idealy one should consider duplication as part as one's archival system, esp when newer standards come out.

I have known a few people who take the time to print 3 images on archival photo paper seperating out the colors and keep the origionals in long term climate controled storage. While overkill for my application I can respect the fact that this system can be read in the future time.

100 years no but 10 years yes, the cd is 23 years old so the DVD has a life ahead of it still. You won't need an old computer, probably make combo drives like todays that read and write cd's and dvd's, HD-DVD, BluRay and HVD. :-)

In ten years you might want to transfer to the new medium of the day. I just moved from cd-r to DVD+R for some important data.
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Old Oct 3, 2005, 9:06 AM   #12
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KnightCrawler wrote:
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100 years no but 10 years yes, the cd is 23 years old so the DVD has a life ahead of it still. You won't need an old computer, probably make combo drives like todays that read and write cd's and dvd's, HD-DVD, BluRay and HVD. :-)

In ten years you might want to transfer to the new medium of the day. I just moved from cd-r to DVD+R for some important data.
Assuming newer generation drives will still read the older ones.

Well, you won't need an old computer in the future so long that you have an SATA to ATA connector, and so long as systems 10 years down the road support legacy standards such as ATA or even SATA assuming that SATA gets replaced with something else. At some point I should actually invest in a decent tape drive.
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