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Old Feb 5, 2006, 4:07 PM   #1
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Hi all, another newbie with a question about Canon printers. :G

I have an older Epson C60 that I plan to continue using for text documents, so I'm mainly concerned with finding a good dedicated photo printer. Although 13x9 prints would be nice, I don't think that's in my price range at the moment.

My questions are:

Is dpi REALLY the "holy grail"? Or is picoliter size more important?

Where does the number of colors/ink cartridges rank? Do the 6-8 color printers really offer significant benefit over the 4-5 color system?

Print speed isn't hugely important. I scrapbook, print photos for display and gift-giving, so quality is most important to me, with value a close second priority. I started considering Canon mostly because of the individual ink tank system. I have been using an HP Photosmart 7660 for photos up until recently, when I got fed up with the two ink tank system. I would invariably run out of one of the photo colors and need to replace the entire $30-$35 cartridge. The individual tank system seems more economical, in theory. How is it, in practice?

I am leery of aftermarket ink, mainly because using it with the Epson C60 greatly reduced the print quality.

I was mostly considering the ip6600D because of the 6-color system and high dpi, but after reading here I am now also considering the 5200 and older 5000. They both get glowing reviews for photo printing, even though they both use just 4 colors.

Can anyone help clear things up for me? :?
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Old Feb 5, 2006, 4:14 PM   #2
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Forgot to add, I am also considering the 4200/4000 (I found it for slightly over $100), but the lower dpi and less nozzles have me wondering...
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Old Feb 5, 2006, 4:24 PM   #3
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Me again...

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"I've discounted the 4000 because it has lower dpi. It also appears, from Canon's comparison chart, that the pigment black is not compatible with the 4000, only the 4200? And the only black compatible with the 4000 is the BCI black? I think I read here that the BCI black doesn't last as long as the pigment black?

Forgive me if I sound like a blabbering idiot. I'm trying to absorb a ton of information in a very short time.
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Old Feb 5, 2006, 4:35 PM   #4
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I think it's now between the 6600D and the 5200.

The 5200 has more nozzles, but doesn't have the extra two photo colors (light cyan and light magenta) that the 6600D has.

But the 6600D has an equal number of nozzles for each color, 512 for each one. The 5200 has 1024 nozzles for both magenta and cyan, 512 nozzles for black and yellow.

So--do the light magenta and light cyan that the 6600D offers make a big difference in photo quality? Or does the extra nozzles that the 5200 offers make it the better photo printer choice?

I may just analyze this myself, LOL! Hopefully some experts can come along and "check my work". :lol:
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Old Feb 6, 2006, 4:53 AM   #5
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http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_...tml#conclusion

http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/pri...000/page-6.htm

thats what they say !

I say that looking forcompetetative stockists of extra inks involved in an 8 ink printer could be a pain, let alone looking for 3rd party compatables . I have had experience of 4, 5, and 6 colour Canon printers. In my opinion that 3 colours and 2 blacks are currently very good, several reviewers have said they are hard pushed to tell the difference.

I donthave Photo Cyan or Photo Magenta in either the Pixma 4000 or the 5200.......and I dont miss them at all.....I constantly compare the result with what is on the screen and its pretty close. It makes life simple if you like re-fill ink to get the 3 colours and black at your local supermarket, when ever you want.

Under a microscope a 6- 8 colour may/should be better.............If you want state of the art ...(regardless) .get a 6-8 colour Canon.
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Old Feb 6, 2006, 5:07 AM   #6
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I have just re-read all your posts again ......on my noticeboard I currently have 3 test pictures of a 6x4 test print of a Monarch butterfly (that my wife took)

One was made by me with the 4000 using re-fill ink , one was made using the 5200 using Canon ink (by me again).......and the 3rd by Canon Uk at their Head Officeusing their 5200 (Specimenprinter ...post print back to sender service)

Resolution wise you cannot tell the difference ......ink colour no difference .
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Old Feb 6, 2006, 7:37 AM   #7
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To scatterbunny,

You seem to be doing your reading. Headphonesman has given you a
pretty good summation regarding a five vs. six or eight color Canon printer.
Bottom line is that you are unlikely to notice much difference except in the
initial purchase price.

What I find ignored in this thread is any information about the relative merits of using the newest generation chipped Canon printer or using the older one generation back non-chipped Canon printers. But the most compelling reason most dedicated photoprinters use Canons lies in printing economy---and these consumable costs economies mainly rest on the premise that the user will either refill or use any one of a number of good third party non-oem prefilled cartridge vendors.

If you choose a chipped Canon you totally lose the option of using any third party non-oem prefilled cartridges and the refilling options are made more difficult.---at least until a way around the chips are found. Nor do I see any real evidence that the new chromalife 100 inks the new chipped Canon use is much superior. Many threads on this forum and in the nifty stuff forums discuss the relative merits of OEM vs. non-oem ink. But bottom line is that some users prefer the results they get with non-oem ink. When you consider that prefilled cartridges can offer up to a 7x reduction over Canon Oem cartridges and refilling options can get you a reduction of around 15x reduction over Canon Oem ink consumable costs------you are talking compelling savings. especially when you consider---Oem ink to Oem ink---you HP printer probally has a ink consumable cost of twice what a Canon uses to print the same thing.

To mention just a few inks some Canon users recommend highly would include MIS, forumla labs, and a new vendor called hobbicolors-----for what its worth I just ordered a refill kit from hobbicolors for each of my two non-chipped Canons--partly because they have cartridges with a screw seal hole, partly because they are rated to have a very close to Oem color balance, and partly because of price and excellent
user communication. Have not used the hobbicolors kit yet as I am still waiting to use up my third party prefilled cartridges.---------others may have other recommendations and experiences on what they use.

So, scatterbunny, while you are doing your reading up on printer choices, I do urge you to consider inkjet consumable printing costs also. But at the end of the day its your money and your choice. But you do burn some bridges behind you when you choose a chipped Canon. The more reading up you do the better your actual printer choice is likely to be.
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Old Feb 6, 2006, 10:59 AM   #8
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I bought an iP5000 Cannon and love it. Use it mostly for photos. Compared to my Epson C80 and my Lexmark Z55 it is awesome. Really film print quality. Better than local shop.

I put the photo paper in the bottom cassette and the regular paper in the sheet feeder and switch by a button on front.

EBAY has the iP5000 with USB cable for Buy IT Now at $109.95 plus $25 shipping.

Stan
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Old Feb 6, 2006, 11:47 AM   #9
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I would certainly agree with Osage on all the points he made other then refilling the chipped cartridges...refilling these cartridges (the infamous chipped 8's) are no different the the 3's or 6's. After 3 warning messages the tank level ability is simply turned off (you have to occasionally look at the tank itself to determine how full it is). Although the ink is different (dye vs pigment).

If the ink monitoring thing is important to you I would suggest that a chip resetter will be available soon (like the Epsons).

Bottom line...i never suggest to anyone to purchase old technology. I think the 1 picoliter "FINE" advantage is worth considering.

PS..of the 11 printers Canon has in development right now...all aside from 1 use the new chipped tanks.

I have the MP500 and love it to pieces! I also have the i960 (older printer) and that one is fantastic as well...just older tech).
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Old Feb 6, 2006, 3:20 PM   #10
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Thanks for all the replies; you've all definitely given me more food for thought.

Another reason I am considering the newer 5200 and 6600 is because of a rebate Canon is offering right now: either a $50 rebate for buying a 5200 or 6600 (or a few other models I'm not interested in) AND a Canon camcorder, or a $30 rebate for the 6600 (and a few others I'm not interested in).

Are the rebates not worth messing with, if the ink costs will be too high? Now you've all got me leaning towards a 5000, it has the high dpi and 1 picoliter drop size that I want, and seems to produce high-quality photos even with just four photo colors.

Originally I was feeling like, "why bother with a printer that has extra black for text, when I've got my old Epson for text?" I figured I should focus on photo quality, and to me, extra colors=better quality. I see now that isn't always the case, though.

I am really afraid of non OEM ink (and wouldn't even attempt refilling, I don't think) because of how it affected my Epson--are you guys saying that if I go with specific kinds of non OEM ink, certain sellers and brands, etc...that I shouldn't have any problems?

Going with the 6600 and whatever camcorder I choose, I would be getting $80-$100 back in rebates.

Are any of these things reason enough to go ahead and get a 6600 or 5200, or does the 5000 still seem like the winner?


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