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Old Feb 22, 2006, 9:55 AM   #11
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Slipe wrote:
>>>>It doesn't work that way. Canons run cleaning cycles only when you print. You can leave the printer on for a month and it won't run a cleaning cycle until you print. It isn't a choice of which strategy saves the most ink, but how much extra ink you use turning it off and on. With your use pattern it probably makes little difference, but you can't save ink by turning it off.<<<<

Minor point, but this is NOT what I was told by Canon tech support (see above). The person I talked with, who really seemed to know her stuff, said that the IP5000 printer would automatically run a 'little' head cleaning operation after being left on for betrween 24 and 48 hours (she wasn't sure of the exact time). She was quite clear that this was true even if no printing was done during that time -- which makes sense, the heads are more likely to clog if they are sitting unused, than if they are being used regularly.
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Old May 1, 2006, 5:48 AM   #12
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I recently got an "out of ink" warning and immediately changed the magenta tank on my iP4000. I've had the printer for a year or so, and done this dozens of times before with no problem. This time, however, any magenta areas in the print were washed out. Thinking that perhaps the tank had dried out somehow, I changed it again, with the same result - any area of pure magenta comes out pale, while areas that should be brilliant red come out a yellow with a slightly brownish tinge.

I have tried everything I can think of - taking out the tank and re-seating it (there is no visible obstruction on the tank or on the upper surface of the print head), cleaning and deep cleaning, but nothing works.

The replacement reservoirs I used are Canon, not third party.

Do you have any suggestion to help me? The official tech help I can get hold of here in Belgium seems to be trained in something other than printers or customers.
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Old May 1, 2006, 8:11 AM   #13
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Zack23 wrote:
Quote:
Minor point, but this is NOT what I was told by Canon tech support (see above). The person I talked with, who really seemed to know her stuff, said that the IP5000 printer would automatically run a 'little' head cleaning operation after being left on for betrween 24 and 48 hours (she wasn't sure of the exact time). She was quite clear that this was true even if no printing was done during that time -- which makes sense, the heads are more likely to clog if they are sitting unused, than if they are being used regularly.
It isn't a minor point to me. I wish my Canon printers did work that way. Unfortunately my iP4000 and S9000 both run their cleaning cycles when I print something if I haven't printed anything for 24 to 48 hours. I've had them long enough to be sure that they don't randomly wake up and do cleaning cycles and to know that they run those cycles if I haven't printed anything for a while only when I print something. No printer of mine has ever knowingly been switched off and I spend a lot of time at the computer, so I've had enough observation time to be sure of that on my two printers.

It is a nuisance to have to wait for a cleaning cycle when I want to print something and haven't printed for a while. Since I refill and ink costs aren't a factor for me, it would be much better to have the printer run cycles automatically when not in use and print immediately every time I want to print something. If the iP5000 works differently from the others it would be an advantage to me if not to others. But I doubt it does.

Kalense Your best bet is to pull the heads and soak them head down in ammonia or hot water. Avoid getting the ammonia or hot water in the intake or you will waste ink getting them back to full strength.

An alternative is to put a drop of ammonia into the magenta intake. The magenta will be slightly weak when you first get it running that way and it might be easier than pulling the heads.


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Old May 2, 2006, 4:28 AM   #14
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Just a small note but I suspect that the grey area here is that the Canons will essentially "queue" a minor head clean/purge after 24/36 hours so that the printer will, when next sent a print job, actually complete the clean/purge before it carries out the print job.

I see the same sort of thing happen with my Epsons and given that I have left all my printers on and slept/worked for long days in the same room (before I finally got my own house/and seperate workspace), I can confirm it wasn't waiting for me to get a cuppa before running a cleaning schedule..


As for all the stuff about sponges drying out... My experience is limited on that point but it does seem that keeping a cart topped up would minimise any drying action but ultimately any air is going to dry out sponge over time.. .plus of course you have the algae issue so it's all horses for courses..
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