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Old Dec 2, 2006, 10:13 AM   #191
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Sam:

Excellent information. Thank you!

Concerning the MP830 waste ink pads, have you had to replace them and, if so, how?

I have seen modifications to Epson's where the waste ink is easily routed to an external receptacle instead of to the internal diaper. I have also read that similarly modifying Canon's is much more difficult.


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Old Dec 2, 2006, 3:17 PM   #192
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Stratman wrote:
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Concerning the MP830 waste ink pads, have you had to replace them and, if so, how?
I can't speak for the MP830 (although I do now have one of my own) but I took a look at an iP4000 and figured out how to re-route the waste ink pump flow to an external bottle.

It required:
- removal of the side panels
- removal of the plastic case top
- unscrewing 4 screws
- carefully lifting the main printer unit off the base

The pads were located underneath and in respect of actually getting to those it's a lot easier than in Epsons but still not easy.. With a multifunctional I honestly don't think you'd find it that easy... At bare minimum you're looking at disconnection of a whole series of circuit boards, memory card inputs, etc.. and that on it's own is going to cause a lot of pain.

In truth if you're desperate I'd look for a service manual and see if you can figure out where the pads are, in relation to the base of the unit and drill a large hole into the base so that the waste ink can drip out into a drip tray. I honestly think that would be a hell of a lot safer... There's that or sending it to a service center.
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Old Dec 3, 2006, 9:22 AM   #193
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Websnail:

That is a headache in the making!

I am not currently having an issue with waste ink but thought I would ask Sam Cahir how he took care of it (if he has as of yet). I would rather be proactive on certain subjects than wait for the problem to happen and then scramble to fix it. Sam said he has service manuals, Maybe he will post a link or share a scan of the waste pad area.

Thanks for the info.
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Old Dec 4, 2006, 3:32 AM   #194
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Hi guys,

Look we sell an enormous amount of units and we also use our printers MP830/MP800/MP500/IP4200/IP4300/IP5300 to death printing manuals 24/7. We have reset the waste pad a couple of times and never changed it or even contemplated using a waste ink bottle. Obviously some of our customers print enormous Qty's of CD's and covers for perhaps dubious reasons and even they don't use a waste ink bottle.

We don't even recommend it for our epson users despite it being so easy to install. The reason is that it is really superfluos. IF you really did get to a stage where you needed to change the pad, there are other pads which would need replacing. IF and When this happens you are best to either legitimately service the printer or simply replace it. You can replace the pad yourself and in fact you can clean it as in most cases it is jusr a piece of rubber. If it happes just google the service manual for the individual printer or simply take your printer apart and replace or clean the pads.

Gents we are talking about printers which are almost cheaper to by than repair. The average waste ink counter is set at 30,000 prints. Unfortunately every head clean counts for 25 odd prints which is where the majority of the ink comes from (bear in mind every time you turn it on and off it performs a head clean).

My advice is that you can GENERALLY do a reset (key press on Canon/ Software Epson) about 3-4 times before the pad will physically be full.... Stick to this and don't mess with pad bottles etc, as I said they are not really required because if you actually get to this stage there are other pads in the printer to consider also the print heads themselves are rated at only 50,000 prints (Extremely conservative).

Regards,

Sam Cahir

RIHAC Digital Solutions Australia (www.rihac.com.au)
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Old Dec 4, 2006, 6:10 AM   #195
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Sam Cahir wrote:
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Look we sell an enormous amount of units and we also use our printers MP830/MP800/MP500/IP4200/IP4300/IP5300 to death printing manuals 24/7. We have reset the waste pad a couple of times and never changed it or even contemplated using a waste ink bottle. Obviously some of our customers print enormous Qty's of CD's and covers for perhaps dubious reasons and even they don't use a waste ink bottle.
Hi Sam,

I'm actually going to disagree to some of your points because you seem to be applying the same experience to all printers when my experience differs across the board.

I fully agree that the Canons waste very little ink (unless a user is doing a lot of head cleaning which obviously raises questions about their ink suitability).. and having fitted an iP4000 with a waste ink tank out of curiosity I have to admit it seems pretty pointless with Pixma printers (assuming that all Canon Pixmas have similar wastage).

HOWEVER, when it comes to Epsons I have to disagree in a major way.. Printers like the CX6600, R3x0, R2x0 and C8x models kick out a massive amount of waste ink.. My CX6600 has been putting out so much waste that regular use over a three month period will result in the thing hitting max before you blink. In fact the major problem was that it was purging nearly 5ml of ink every time you turned the damned thing on. So, I actually do think that fitting a waste bottle is a good idea (although not necessarily the moment you get the printer )

In addition the Epson printers (especially those of the past 2 or so years) are built in such a way that you have a hell of a time getting to the waste pads so you're much better off installing a waste ink tank and using that.

Final note: Doing this does of course mean it is possible to make mistakes that cause backflow into the cleaning head and other problems, so you need to be careful but considering the printhead is capable of lasting for years past its service point, even if you thrash it, I don't see why you should have to get it serviced when you can side step it easy enough.

Quote:
My advice is that you can GENERALLY do a reset (key press on Canon/ Software Epson) about 3-4 times before the pad will physically be full.... Stick to this and don't mess with pad bottles etc, as I said they are not really required because if you actually get to this stage there are other pads in the printer to consider also the print heads themselves are rated at only 50,000 prints (Extremely conservative).
Again, I'd agree with this to a point with the Canons but with the Epsons you do ONE reset and then when you hit the "Service required" message a second time, you consider a new printer, service or fit the waste tank. I wouldn't recommend more than 3 resets on a Canon either based on some of the experiences posted on Nifty-stuff..

If you do go further then I'd have a tray under the printer to catch the spill if/when it floods so you don't get the boss, wife, partner, etc.. fuming at the ruined carpet, furniture, etc..


In summary we sort of agree Sam but I don't think you can apply a blanket rule to all the printers as they simply don't work the same across the board.
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Old Dec 5, 2006, 6:24 PM   #196
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Sam

Finally I got to see what was making me jibe at what I have come to call 'Open Lid Theory' for the iP5200. It involves a couple of pieces of lateral thinking, sellotape (as in 'lots of'), the cover of a CD jewel case and a couple of pencil-end rubbers. The result gives you robust, fully adjustable tubeset path, misses the print head cables by 5mm at the closest proximity and allows the lid to be kept down and fully functional. Just as a bonus no change is made to the printer whatsoever, it can be returned to its origional condition with only the cartridge chips to say what has happened.

I hope I can get the following image loaded and linked:


Attached Images
 
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Old Dec 14, 2006, 11:23 PM   #197
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HiThe image is fine....Not so sure about the CISS. The tubing looks like it is tucked under the cartridge control lever which may cause an issue later on. The cartridge arm lever is on the opposite side when looking at an IP4000 to an IP4200. The new IP4300 has the arm back on the same side as the 4000. What we do with our CISS units is we have a different system for each printer series. The primary difference is tubing exiting the cartridges to the left and others to the right. But hey if your system works stick with it.

Regards,

Sam Cahir

RIHAC Digital Solutions

http://www.rihac.com.au
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Old Jan 1, 2007, 4:37 AM   #198
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to the Gentleman from AU I have been hunting the Internet for many hour trying to fid a CISS for my Canon ip8500 - I found 2 suppliers both chinese - too risky to use either - can you point me to a reliable source that will post to New Zealand ?

Grateful for any help

Mauro mauro@Ihug.co.nz
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Old Jan 5, 2007, 7:29 PM   #199
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Hi Mauro,

I have emailed you directly with the answer r.e. this printer but I'll post it as well in the event it helps anyone.

We did a solid 6 month R&D on this printer and although we did develop a CISS it was far from 100% reliable. We had upto a 40% failure rate which is far too much for a commercial unit. The main issue is due to the head seals (rubber grommets) which the cartridges seat against. In this model that are around 5-6mm in height and hollow. Although we developed a seal for these printers it could not prevent air breaching under the grommets and into the cartridges preventing the CISS system from re-fillling the cartridges.

Canon no longer use these type of grommets in their new range (chipped cartridges) however there is still a need for a silicone style seal as the grommets are smaller but still hollow.

Regards,

Sam Cahir

www.rihac.com.au
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Old Jan 23, 2007, 6:12 AM   #200
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I hope you can help.

I install a continuous ink refill system on my ip4200.

As soon as I started the printer, it jammaed under the left edge and made a grating sound.. Eventaually all the ink ran out from the PG5 bottle.

I had to get a new IP4200, luckily, they were on sale for about $50.

First, what did I do wrong.? I followed the instructions to a T, but no luck

The system was made in China, that may have been the problem.

Do you recommend any other kits.

magicman.


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