Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Printers > Photo Inkjet

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 17, 2006, 3:43 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2
Default

I currently have an HP 6540 printer which, in my opinion, does quite well for photos. Situation in the family creates opportunity to add a printer.

Would like to improve cost per print but NOT give up any photo print quality. Sooner improve print quality (if practical - highly impressed with photo quality of 6540).

Going through 50-count pack of HP premium photo paper per six weeks.

Understand that variables impacting cost per print are fairly complex, like: 1) cost of new ink cartridges, 2) third-party ink cartridge availability, 3) cost of paper required to work with special printer, 4) amount of ink applied, 5) original cost of the printer to allocate

Printer is always connected to a PC so I don't need onboard print controls (use Adobe Photoshop)

All of those things considered (and what else you may know that is important)... what printer do you recommend, and why?

Thinks , in advance, to anyone who expresses a helpful opinion!





smalltownguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 17, 2006, 4:15 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 139
Default

To smalltownguy,

Check out the Canon ip6000d at outpost.com for $100.00 if you are in the USA.
Its a non-chipped Canon--so its equally adept at using OEM cartridges, dirt cheap third party cartridges, or being refilled.

The ip6000d is a speciality purpose photoprinter and is not as good for general text.
But any Canon using the BCI-3&6 cartridge line will be very economical and will output very good photoprints. But most of those are now hard to find.

Unless you refill, its hard to save much with a HP. And some of those are now chipped.

But at your print volume you should be able to save by a factor of 20 x over Canon OEM cartridges if you refill with a top quality ink from formulalabs, MIS, or hobbicolors. And as a rule of thumb Canon OEM ink consumable costs are about half what HP oem is.

But photoprinting is expensive in terms of ink consumable costs--figure around a buck for a 8x10 print using OEM ink---at your volume refilling is compelling. Check out the nifty stuff forums for additional info.
Osage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 17, 2006, 1:09 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2
Default

Thank you, very much for taking the time for such a helpfulreply.
smalltownguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 17, 2006, 8:46 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 735
Default

smalltownguy wrote:
Quote:
I currently have an HP 6540 printer which, in my opinion, does quite well for photos. Situation in the family creates opportunity to add a printer.

Would like to improve cost per print but NOT give up any photo print quality. Sooner improve print quality (if practical - highly impressed with photo quality of 6540).

Going through 50-count pack of HP premium photo paper per six weeks.

Understand that variables impacting cost per print are fairly complex, like: 1) cost of new ink cartridges, 2) third-party ink cartridge availability, 3) cost of paper required to work with special printer, 4) amount of ink applied, 5) original cost of the printer to allocate

Printer is always connected to a PC so I don't need onboard print controls (use Adobe Photoshop)

All of those things considered (and what else you may know that is important)... what printer do you recommend, and why?

Thinks , in advance, to anyone who expresses a helpful opinion!

Aftermarket ink as pointed out by Osage is not an option for the newer canon series yet, unless you buy it bulk and add it your self. The ip6000 while not my favorite is worth looking at as there are at least compatables for it. I very much prefer the older i960 for it has a larger head and printquality is slightly better, but I can't find anyone who sells it.

I have the Canon ip3000, the mp760 which is basicly the ip4000, and just bought the new ip5200. The ip5200 as reviewed here on stevesdigicams was stated as being almost as good as the ip8500, an 8 tank printer, and couldn't tell the difference unless you looked at it under a loop. My choice rather than going with the ip6000/6600D was the fact that I do text printing, and even buying OEM canon ink it's pretty cost effective on the ip3000/4000/5000/4200/5200. Not so on the 6 tank models. Canon offers a 7 tank model, offering both the big black for plain paper and the 6 dye tanks, but only in japan. That's the ip7500 which is the engine behind the mp950, the expensive multifuction.

I have yet to use my ip5200 enough to compair to my epson r200, which I don't use. But I have to admit I prefered the photo quality on the r200, a printer that you can sometimes get for under $100, or sometimes less than the ink it comes with. There are compatables and bulk ink for it, though I consider it to be a fickle creature prone to clogging, and wasteful in the ink department. Not to speak of the fact it's a frameless wonder. But photos are surpurb.

Both the canons and the epsons work pretty dang well on Kirkland photopaper, which is about $20 for 125 pages. Not as long life as the HP paper, but fast drying and somewhat water resistant, though more so it seems using Canon or Canon compatable ink.

The r800 is the next step up in the epson department, and if you buy anything epson before may 8th you qualify for the settlement. It's only $45, but that's enough for a few cartridges. You can get the r800 in the epson store in it's referb state for only $200.00 free shipping, and the last time I checked the referbs carry the year warranty. Aftermarket pigment ink is a legit option, and unlike aftermarket dye is going to give you better print life. But pigments don't look spiffy on photopaper, though the r800 includes a clear tank to help brozing. But unless you use aftermarket ink on this sucker, I can't say it would improve your cost per print.

Cost per print
ip6000D - lots of compatables, more than you can shake a stick at
ip5000 - Like the new printers but lots of compatables
ip4200/5200 - does a great job with 4 color printing, decent cost per print with the factory ink. Bulk ink an option, no comatables.
ip6600D - higher resolution version of the 6600d, no compatables but bulk ink an option if you refill your self
HP8250 - Close to being onpar with the canons in terms of cost per print for OEM ink, not compatables that i'm aware.
R200 - disposable printer with wonderful color, Many compatables
r800 - pigment printer, very nice, more costly compatables. Cheap referb unit $200 on epson.com










zakezuke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 17, 2006, 11:13 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 139
Default

To smalltownguy,

You were lucky to get an awesome and market inclusive post from Zakezuke, far more extensive than I had time to write. Zakezuke was somewhat too modest to extol the virtues of his MP760--which is mostly in the area of the excellent scanner it has.

Zakezuke is also correct in mentioning the i960, perhaps argueably the best inkjet printer ever made. But if you can't find or buy one, its somewhat academic. Which is why I did mention the ip6000d, its definitely not as good, but it is available for about $100.00---although it used to carry a much higher list price. I also forgot to mention the Canon MP780---very similar to the MP760 of Zakezuke's--except it trades the excellent scanner of the MP760 for a slighly inferior one but gains a fax the MP760 does not have.--and that MP780 was being advertised as of 2 weeks ago on Fry's electronics for $100. after rebates--but by now is likely available on only a store by store basis-----as some of the absolute last non-chipped Canons leave the retail supply chain. There is always ebay---but non-chipped Canons are now selling at somewhat a premium.

I am far too risk adverse to consider an Epson--there is no argueing that their out put and economy are very good. But they are not as user servicable as a canon and Epsons are prone to printhead clogging.

Nor am I aware of your budget---I mentioned the ip6000d only because its a readily available bargain. Other better printers exist but they get pricey fast. But for studying the overall printer market, Zakezukes post is far better guide than mine.
Osage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 18, 2006, 3:58 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 735
Default

Osage wrote:
Quote:
TI also forgot to mention the Canon MP780---very similar to the MP760 of Zakezuke's--except it trades the excellent scanner of the MP760 for a slighly inferior one but gains a fax the MP760 does not have.--and that MP780 was being advertised as of 2 weeks ago on Fry's electronics for $100. after rebates--but by now is likely available on only a store by store basis-----as some of the absolute last non-chipped Canons leave the retail supply chain. There is always ebay---but non-chipped Canons are now selling at somewhat a premium.

I am far too risk adverse to consider an Epson--there is no argueing that their out put and economy are very good. But they are not as user servicable as a canon and Epsons are prone to printhead clogging.

Nor am I aware of your budget---I mentioned the ip6000d only because its a readily available bargain. Other better printers exist but they get pricey fast. But for studying the overall printer market, Zakezukes post is far better guide than mine.
I didn't realise the mp760 had a better scanner... possibly due to it needing a CCD for enough depth of field to do slides? I remember seeing the mp780 somewhere for an OK price... ah amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...Fencoding=UTF8
$220 free super saver shipping

Canon I feel has alot to learn about making a multi-fuctional. Basicly what you are buying is a printer that has a scanner which can fax. Dealing with other people who own the mp780, the most common complain is the fact that there is no fax software that comes with it... you can fax from the PC but not receive faxes on your PC, or so I am told. It's just dandy for people who have their own software to use the features to comes with, but isn't a full fledged solution like HP offers. I can only speak for the mp760. Perfectly fine for me, but I use photoshop and not any of the canon software.

But it's $220, and unless you plan to print documents to any degree, the i6000D is probally the best bet if you want compatables. The r800 I do agree with Osage in the fact they are fickle creatures. But printing on average 50 sheets every 6 weeks, clogging should "not" be an issue. If you go days or weeks between printing, you'll get a clog, you might need the windex and paper towel, and get A. Entlich's Epson cleaning manual if you run into trouble. It's a $400 printer for $200, comes with $100 of oem ink... the best deal I know of is from lasermonks for OEM
http://www.lasermonks.com/index.php?...0484_6959_6634
www.inksupply.com has some cheep cartridges form china for $5.00 but I don't know the quality.



zakezuke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 18, 2006, 10:20 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Indian Rocks Beach, FL
Posts: 4,036
Default

There was a very long discussion on this board about the relative costs of HP ink. Most tests are done by printing a lot of images at once. But over long use the posts quoted a testing outfit that considered the continual cleaning that Canon and Epson printer do that HP printers don't require. Cleaning uses ink. If you haven't used your Canon for a couple of days it runs a cleaning cycle when you use it. If you regularly turn your printer off it uses a cleaning cycle when you turn it on. It also runs a cleaning cycle after a certain number of printing. The upshot of the quoted test was that in normal use the HPs do at least as well on ink use.

XP has built-in fax software. I receive faxes using just the XP software and have dumped WinFax as it isn't as reliable. You do have to know when someone is faxing you something though or have it set to answer the phone and check for a fax. But even a fax machine requires the same thing unless you have a dedicated fax line.

I haven't used any new model HPs. The tanks have always been chipped but with my old HPs they didn't stop printing just because the chip thought the tank was empty. There was a way to reset the chip – the procedure is online somewhere. HP large pigmented black tanks are very easy to refill. The color is a little tricky in that if you overfill the tank it causes ink to leak out the heads and contaminate adjacent colors. I didn't have problems after I learned to sample the level of ink in the sponge and not overfill it. MIS ink worked well in both of my HPs but I did have to alter the profile for both MIS ink and Red River paper. HP paper seemed to stay tacky for a long time and I didn't like it. Just changing paper brand often alters the color balance even with HP ink.

Canon color tanks are easier to fill than HP.

slipe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 9:59 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 735
Default

slipe wrote:
Quote:
XP has built-in fax software. I receive faxes using just the XP software and have dumped WinFax as it isn't as reliable. You do have to know when someone is faxing you something though or have it set to answer the phone and check for a fax. But even a fax machine requires the same thing unless you have a dedicated fax line.

XP "does" have built in fax software... however HPs or at least mine and some of the new consumer AIOs with fax permit you to type something like 321 on your telephone for incomming faxes. It lets you share a traditional answering machine, and allows you to accept a fax without being at the machine.

The XP fax software doens't permit network faxing... i.e. faxing from a remote system. It should, but it doesn't.

Oh and it looks like the r200 is back on the epson website for $60 in it's referb state, or $17 less than the ink costs in a local office store. That's $60 free shipping. It's not a bad deal even if the printer fails quickly.



zakezuke is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:45 AM.