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Old Jun 16, 2006, 4:02 PM   #1
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I am attempting to use an Epson Stylus Photo R800 to print chemicals on glass for chemistry research. Since the printer has 8 cartridges this method allows me to quickly mix 8 different chemicals in lots of combinations and proportions by simply printing gradients. However, I have quickly discovered that even when I print what seems to be a pure color (magenta), some ink from each cartridge is deposited including signficiant amounts of black and yellow ink. Is there a way for me to manually control which cartridge is used to print each pixel? For example, I would like to say that one spot should get 1.5 pL from the first cartridge and 3.0 pL from the second but nothing from he remaining cartridges. Then I would like to build up a gradient so that I can know how much of each chemical was deposited at any given point.

The problem is even more complex since this particular printer contains red and blue cartridges in addition to cyan, magenta, yellow. These seem to be redundant, so I don't understand how the printer or computer decides when to print red from the red cartridge and when to print it by mixing combinations of cyan, magenta, and yellow.

If anyone has any advice or ideas about how to gain complete control over the cartridges, please let me know. I have a feeling that this may require something significantly more complicated than and ICC profile.
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Old Jun 18, 2006, 12:20 PM   #2
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Not really sure what your doing but for starters you need to make sure the document us in CYMK and not RGB to get true Magenta.

Then you need to make sure you change the specific colors value to 100% and all other colors not wanted to 0%

So CYMK and your your values are

Cyan 0%

Magenta 100%

Yellow 0%

Black 0%

In RGB it would try printing at something like

Cyan 4%

Magenta 93%

Yellow 0%

Black 0%

Is this what your seeing?



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Old Jun 18, 2006, 1:43 PM   #3
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What I'm seeing is even worse. I used The Gimp to create a big magenta box in CMYK that was 100% cyan. Since the Epson cartridges all have chips that record how many times they open and close, I was able to monitor how much of each ink dispensed. When the magenta box was printed, some of all 8 inks were dispensed (CMYK, photo black, red, blue, gloss). Surprisingly it seemed that black and yellow were used more than anything else. I checked with Epson and they confirmed that black is mixed in with everything. I can turn the black down, but not remove it.

I'm currently investigating using a GIMP-Print driver so that I can potentially modify the code in order to get the control I need. If someone know how this would be done, please let me know.

Thanks.
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Old Jun 18, 2006, 7:42 PM   #4
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Well I can see that happening since the printer has 8 colors so a true magenta really isn't their so a mixture would need to be created to make a magenta. You would need a 4 cartridge printer that actually has CYMK ink.

I will check into my 7600 Epson printer but I think its impossible to get magenta with out some mixture since as I mentioned true magenta isn't a color.

My old 1280 printed magenta because it only had 4 inks that are CYMK, I have never tested it on my 7600
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