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Old Jun 18, 2006, 6:22 PM   #1
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I use a Canon Rebel XT to take pictures and I wonder what the general consensus is, if there is one, as to which inkjet produces the truest, most pleasing output of photo prints. I had been told the Pixma 8500 but I see it has been discontinued, There are too many choices I think and too many conflicting reviews. In the real world, which one works best for you and why? Im a stickler for clear, bright and true images and I dont want something that will be less than excellent. Thanks in advance for your opinions!
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Old Jun 19, 2006, 6:47 AM   #2
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babydoc wrote:
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I use a Canon Rebel XT to take pictures and I wonder what the general consensus is, if there is one, as to which inkjet produces the truest, most pleasing output of photo prints. I had been told the Pixma 8500 but I see it has been discontinued, There are too many choices I think and too many conflicting reviews. In the real world, which one works best for you and why? Im a stickler for clear, bright and true images and I dont want something that will be less than excellent. Thanks in advance for your opinions!
If you want the ip8500, you can froogle.com it up. Same with the hp 8450, which can be had for a song. The Epson r800 can be had from the epson clerance site and is still in production.

The Canon ip8500 is worth looking into not only because it's a top notch photo printer, but because it's using the older in which can be had for $9.60ish/tank if you shop costco. This makes it only a little bit more than the ink for the new ip5200, where 5 tanks will run you $72 on a good day. If you can not find the ip8500 you can always get the wide i9900, or wait till september for the new model, but expect the new model to take 8 tanks at $13.50 each.

The HP 8450 can be had for a song, under $200. It costs a pretty penny to refill. Aside from being a top notch photo printer, it offers card slots and ethernet, and will take a text cartridge. Rather than adding colors, it adds a tri photo grey tank, and a dye black on the photo tank.

The Epson r800 takes the pigment inks, and while the printer can be fickle and may require maitance not documented in the manual, prints last an age.

Tomshardware has sample scans from each of these printers
http://www.tomshardware.com/2004/12/...igh/page6.html






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Old Jun 19, 2006, 11:54 AM   #3
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What do you think of the epson wihtthe 8 tanks and the "Gloss tank thingie?" Any good?
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Old Jun 19, 2006, 1:07 PM   #4
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babydoc wrote:
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What do you think of the epson wihtthe 8 tanks and the "Gloss tank thingie?" Any good?
You can ask for a sample from Epson
(800) 463-7766

It is an excelent photo printer, one would not be foolish buying it. It looks great on matte paper, and lasts an age on matte paper. Ink might be spendy, and it tends to waste it. But if your planning to print to regular photo paper one would be wise to consider either the HP, the Canon, or one of Epsons dye models. But with the HP or Canon you can at least bring your digial camera and print at the store with pictbridge, they ususally agree so long as you leave your prints there.


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Old Jun 19, 2006, 2:31 PM   #5
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Maybe Im putting this incorrectly, but do 8 ink tanks make it better? I will print mainly glossy photos, I like the deffinition better on glass. Are the number of nozzels of consequence, or the type of ink spcifically the Chorma inks from Canon or the other inks from Epson or HP? I want the pictures to last, but the inks in teh Canon arent rated to last 100 yrs and it isnt my FIRST priority. Iw ant good looking pictures with good color reporduction and good sharp crisp output.
Thanks!
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Old Jun 19, 2006, 4:54 PM   #6
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babydoc wrote:
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Maybe Im putting this incorrectly, but do 8 ink tanks make it better? I will print mainly glossy photos, I like the deffinition better on glass. Are the number of nozzels of consequence, or the type of ink spcifically the Chorma inks from Canon or the other inks from Epson or HP? I want the pictures to last, but the inks in teh Canon arent rated to last 100 yrs and it isnt my FIRST priority. Iw ant good looking pictures with good color reporduction and good sharp crisp output.
Thanks!
Canon is rated 100 years in a dark album storage, 25 years or so under glass on pr101 paper. I forget the year it's rated not underglass, but I think it's 10 years, perhaps 5, and I think that was canon's inhouse test and not wilhelm-research. This is slightly skewed as the premium paper is microporous and that isn't as good against fade resistance as the swellable polymer types. I recently bought HP paper for my ip5200, and contrasting that with the cheaper kirkland photo paper, I gotta say on kirkland photo paper wins appearance. You can spray your prints to get more life out of them.

the HP 8450 is a tad better in testing by wihelm, and has an offical webpage on their site. But the really long life prints were done on swellable polymer paper.

The R800 on the other hand is rated at 70 years on matte paper, this is not under glass.

I am aware you are asking "does 8 tanks make it better", and i'm trying not to play favorites. But this is the basic low down

1. 4/5 tanks - good enough
2. 6 tanks - typicaly extra light cyan/light magenta used for filling the white between the primary colors. Provides the apearance of less grain, but uses these extra inks like candy.
3. 8 tanks - Extra colors such as Red and Green, or Red and Blue. Less need for dithering. The r800 doesn't have light cyan/magenta IIRC
4. 9 tanks - That's the HP 8450, 3 cartridges, three chambers. 4 blacks (one in the photo cartridge, one optional photo grey cartridge), light magenta/cyan.
5. 10 tanks - Come setember this is the pixma pro 9500. three blacks, red green, and the usual set of primary and light cyan/magenta. Wide model only, pigment inks. Expect it to cost alot.

To get a better image, you can either make the dots smaller, or use more inks, and I lean tward more inks my self, even though I own the ip5200 and not the ip6600 or ip8500. My choice was based in the fact that I needed a general purpose printer that was easy to refill which does CDs, and the HP 8450 does not print on cds nor is it IMHO easy to refill. And the canon ip5200 reaches the point where you really need a good lens to tell it apart from the ip8500.

But above and beyond the technology, you really have to see the output of these pritners to judge what's right for you. It could be the epson r800, or you might not like the fact that even with the glossy layer the inks will broze. You might prefer the shadows on the ip8450, or you might prefer the Canon. There are those who prefer the cheep $59 to $70 Epson R2x0/R3x0 which are, in all fairness great photo printers.

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Old Jul 12, 2006, 1:38 PM   #7
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zakezuke wrote:
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babydoc wrote:
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To get a better image, you can either make the dots smaller, or use more inks, and I lean tward more inks my self, even though I own the ip5200 and not the ip6600 or ip8500. My choice was based in the fact that I needed a general purpose printer that was easy to refill which does CDs, and the HP 8450 does not print on cds nor is it IMHO easy to refill. And the canon ip5200 reaches the point where you really need a good lens to tell it apart from the ip8500.

The Canon ip5200's prints are good, but if you want the best of all worlds, you should consider the MP950. It has fast, excellent text printing like the ip5200,ANDsix-ink photo printing,AND drops as small as 1-picoliter! The light cyan and light magenta inks do make the photos a bit smoother. I have used both printers, and though the difference the extra inks make is subtle, there is a difference. I also got a little more color gamut (especially in blues and greens) with the MP950. If your photo is sharp and well exposed, the printed results are outstanding (I have found best results with Photo Paper Pro, with Highest QUality Q1 setting, Color Management set to "none," and Magenta increased to +10. With the default setting of Color Management set to "Photo," my pictures all looked too reddish. I also turn on the Noise Reduction for any pictures with large areas of blank skies or walls).True you'll spend more on ink because of the extra photo inks, and the printer itsself costs more ($325 on Amazon with free shipping is the best I saw), but for the money you will also get a full range of photo, copy and scan functions.


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Old Jul 13, 2006, 11:48 PM   #8
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Zakazuke, thanks for posting the link to the 3 printer shootout on Tom's Hardware! That was exactly what I was looking for.

As for the HP you mentioned the model you're thinking of is the 8750. And the Canon Pro 9500 won't be coming till "some time in 2007" now. Canon Canada even apologizes on their website for the wait. The Pro 9000 is coming in October (9 inks and uses dye inks instead of pigment in the 9500).

I'm interested in the two upcoming Pro printers from Canon. But would like to read about some test reports first. So, either I'm going to have to wait till "some time in 2007" for the Canon Pro 9500's test reports or buy something now to hold me over. Like one of the 3 tested on that shootout.

Have you had any experience with either of the 3? How are Epson's these days? Are they reliable? I ask because I have a funky Epson C60. In short, when either of the two carts near empty the color output is totally off. Don't know if it's just my C60, if it's the entire C60 product line or Epson inkjets in general.

Not sure if I should tempt fate and try another Epson in the shape of the R800. Or play it "safe" and get either the HP or Canon. Or the Canon i9900. Decisions, decisions...
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