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Old Aug 30, 2006, 3:24 PM   #1
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I just read about the three new Epson model printers coming out in September and October. They say these printers are going to be some of the best on the market.

My question is: Why would they leave out printing in 13"x19" in a printer that is supposed to be so good. If it prints like they ay and uses new inks then why didn't they make it complete to print on larger paper so photographers and artists could use it. I was waiting for the Canon Pixma Pro9500 until I found out it won't be released until 2007. So I was all set to buy the Epson but the largest it prints is 8x10.



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Old Aug 30, 2006, 5:37 PM   #2
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At a guess it's probably because the R3xx series are more for home users whereas people like photographers, etc... are probably being nudged towards their higher end printers like the R1800, R2400, etc...

Just a WAG though (wild assed guess)
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Old Aug 31, 2006, 1:24 AM   #3
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The new printer will be using a new "Claria Hi Definition" 6-color dye based ink.

Professional/advanced amateurphotographers like pigment based printers because they produce photos that can last as long as 100-200 years (depending on the photo papers) when displayed. They last even longer when inside an album.

The R800/R1800/R2400 printers are targeted for these photographers. The R1800 and R2400 can print up to 13x44 inches.

BTW, I understand that the delay with Canon'sannounced printerisdue toproblems with getting the pigment based ink out of their print head/nozzles.
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Old Sep 13, 2006, 6:45 PM   #4
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Hi, I'm new to this forum, but a long time epson user. I was looking on there site for a new letter size printer, and saw the R380 which uses the claria ink you guys are talking about. According to there site, it can last up to 200 years, wheras the RX800 is only up to 100 years. I was originally planning on buying the RX800, but the R380 seems like the way to go. Am I missing something? I've had the 2200 for larger prints, and the R300 as a backup for doing christmas card printing, which didn't need to last a long time. I love the way the R300 prints, so if the R380 is just as nice but will last me way longer... that's great!


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Old Sep 14, 2006, 8:18 AM   #5
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pds517 wrote:
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Hi, I'm new to this forum, but a long time epson user. I was looking on there site for a new letter size printer, and saw the R380 which uses the claria ink you guys are talking about. According to there site, it can last up to 200 years, wheras the RX800 is only up to 100 years. I was originally planning on buying the RX800, but the R380 seems like the way to go. Am I missing something? I've had the 2200 for larger prints, and the R300 as a backup for doing christmas card printing, which didn't need to last a long time. I love the way the R300 prints, so if the R380 is just as nice but will last me way longer... that's great!

According to Epson.com, the R380 has "fade resistant, up to 200 years album storage." From WIR, the R800 has over 200 years with the R1800 stated as over 300 years (printed on Epson Premium Glossy)and over 400 years in album storage on some paper types. The R800/1800 is also quoted to have over 250 years (framed behind UV filter) or 200 years (framed behind glass) on Epson Watercolor Paper, and over 150 years (framed behind glass) on Epson Heavyweight Matte.

It looks to me like Epson are stating the raw-edge figure for the R380, while the R800/1800 figures are conservative. Still, if they're quoting over 100 years - does it really matter how many centuries more thanonewe get? :G

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Old Sep 15, 2006, 10:14 AM   #6
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JSR wrote:
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It looks to me like Epson are stating the raw-edge figure for the R380, while the R800/1800 figures are conservative. Still, if they're quoting over 100 years - does it really matter how many centuries more thanonewe get? :G

JSR... that was my husband's reaction too! He's like... how long do you think you're going to live for??? :?
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Old Sep 15, 2006, 5:54 PM   #7
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pds517 wrote:
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JSR... that was my husband's reaction too! He's like... how long do you think you're going to live for??? :?
I think it's also worth remembering that the tests done by WIR are described as "before noticeable fading occurs". I'm not sure if the R380 figures come from WIR but if they say "over 100 years", it doesn't mean that you'll wake up on New Year's Day on the 101st year and suddenlysee a plain white sheet of paper! :lol:


I think they also say that when they state "over" a certain period (100, 200, or 400 years, for example), that's just when they stopped testing. One printer with an "over 100 years" figure and another with an "over 200 years" figure, might be fading at the same rate as each other.

Personally, I look at the figures from the tests, halve them (to account for worst case scenario), and if the result is over 50 years, that'll do me.

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