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Old May 29, 2006, 6:01 PM   #1
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There is a company called DXO that has a very interesting program that will automatically color correct and adjust for many things in a photograph. I'm wondering if it is any good at all or just another crap company like ACDsee. If anyone used this program please fill the rest of us in on what it does and does not do.

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Old May 31, 2006, 9:20 AM   #2
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If you have the supported cameras and supported lenses, DXO works well, rapidly, andvirtually automatically& "brainlessly"— many find it highly useful.

Nonetheless, as a skilled user ofPhotoShop CS2,I can accomplish the same, and tweak to my personal preferences,with just a tad more work on my part.
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 6:42 AM   #3
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DxO is very slow memory hogging software with a poor workflow design.In my very subjective test of RAW converters it was near the bottom of the list of my preferences. See:

http://www.dl-c.com/discus/messages/...tml?1148648246

if you are interested.
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Old Jul 21, 2006, 2:48 AM   #4
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DXO is not intuitive like Photoshop. It is slow and when you run something you cant see the result immediately. You have to keep opening and closing little windows to access the various parts of the program. A BIG "forget it" program I think.
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Old Jul 21, 2006, 10:42 AM   #5
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Thanks for the info. Photoshop CS seems to be the best of them all. I guess I'll just stick with it. It does everything I need it to do anyway.

But, I still keep looking at other programs for a reason I can't figure out. I guess I just like to look. Thanks to this forum I save $$$$ by asking before buying.

Ronnie,
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Old Jul 28, 2006, 8:47 AM   #6
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I have been following the DxO story and they are coming out with a new version in Sept. From the sounds of it IMHO it will be the one to beat in terms of quality, speed and functionality...I hope.
See:
http://www.dxo.com/en/photo/v4/default.php
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Old Apr 13, 2007, 10:13 AM   #7
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DxO is one of the most bangs for the buck I've experienced in imaging software, with Photoshop Elements coming in close behind. I'm a confessed software junkie and do like to try out things, and after reading about professionals' use of DxO I knew I had to try it and downloaded the free demo; paid for it shortly afterward. The software comes from a French company with a long background in optical/video/imaging and they have incorporated and automated some complex processes into DxO. The interface is a bit different but quite understandable and support/help is very good.

For a professional being able to set DxO running with your own predetermined template of action on hundreds of raw images could be worth a lot of money (and as others have said, a lot of time, too, but there is always something else to do.) After the software finishes you can adjust any images to personal taste and/or do finishing work in Photoshop.

As a hobbyist I've played with the automated, directed, and expert modes on probably no more than 30 images at a time and it's not particularly slow for that limited quantity processing, I think. (G5 iMac.) I prefer cropping, sharpening and printing from PSElements rather than DxO. For shots that need their tonal range (zones) adjusted I like to use LightZone first (I told you I am a software junkie.)

If your camera and some of its lenses have been characterized by DxO labs I'd recommend you download the software and give it a personal try. Even if they haven't, the perspective control the software offers is quite capable and easily done. The best thing all this is the quantity and quality of image adjusting software keeps getting better and better. More choice is good.
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Old Apr 26, 2007, 7:39 PM   #8
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Hi Jdar,

I also downloaded the trial version and liked it enough to purchase it. When doing 5 or 6 hundred wedding photos it really saves a lot of time processing them to the extent that I now spend very little time in Photoshop.

What I do is size the pictures and re-name each onefirst in Nikon Capture 4 software. Then I process them with DXO on auto. Next step is CS2 and crop if needed but usually don't really need to do much else.

What used to take about two days now only takes a few hours.

DXO has the profiles for My D200 and all of thelenses I have. I have taken advantage of the free upgrades they offer when a new version is available. I now have the very latest version which is much faster then the original version I purchased. I'm pretty happy with DXO. It really saves a lot of computer time.

Of course you can't have a bunch of really crummy photographs to start with. My D200 takes pretty good photos to begin with but they usually need post-processing.

Ronnie

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